Current Postings

The postings below are all still active, and organized by deadline. Once the deadline has passed, they will be moved to the IABA Posting Archive, on the CBR Website

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Studies in Travel Writing is seeking an Editor-in-Chief.

Routledge–Taylor and Francis

Applications must be submitted by 30 September.

Think this could be you? Read more and apply today.

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/#inbox/WhctKKXgmLchNXmqgZMSGRFJPZqmWpvbPVpVcLKRxRGWrwzxBjlbpxKgchKwHRXFTCwHGwL

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Deadline for Submissions September 30, 2022

Call for Chapter Contributions

Diaspora/Diasporas: Cross-cultural Ibero-Caribbean Texts and Context

Editors: Irene M. F. Blayer (PhD), Brock University; Jo-Anne Ferreira (PhD), UWI Trinidad and Tobago; Dulce M. S. Scott (PhD), Anderson University
 
We envision this edited collection to be interdisciplinary and multidimensional, thus incorporating a set of diasporic areas of research within the Ibero-Caribbean context. Chapters are double-blind peer refereed. An invitation to submit a paper in no way guarantees that the paper will be published; this is dependent on the review process. Unpublished and original papers, in English, Portuguese, Spanish, or French are welcome. Proposals that treat other topics not included below but that are of thematic relevance are welcome.

  • Storying the Ibero-Caribbean diaspora
  • Cultural histories in the context of diasporas and globalization
  • Place, history and collective memories /
  • Textualized identity
  • Testimonies, diaries, chronicles, letters, autobiographies
  • Migration and identity: the role of geographical place 
  • The diasporic imaginary: Self in the textual narrative
  • Interfacing literary dialogues
  • Circulation and reception of diaspora literature
  • Bilingualism and multilingualism
  • Language and cultural identity
  • Translation and the trials of identity
  • Tradition and social change
  • Material and non-material culture
  • Sociology and psychology of the migrant experience
  • Oral vs. written narratives
  • Cross-generational narratives/ diaries, chronicles, letters 
  • The economics of language policy in immigration
  • Language, dislocation, and exile
  • Cross-generational narratives
  • Ethnography of language
  • Re-imagining Ibero-American Insular spaces/worlds

Submissions

The deadline for the receipt of abstracts (450-500 words) and a biographical note (300-350 words) is September 30, 2022.  Those invited to submit full chapters will be notified by December 30th, 2022.  
Complete chapter drafts should be approximately 4,500-6,500 words including endnotes and bibliography. Chapters must follow the MLA style rules, and will be due June 30, 2023. 

Prospective contributors should email all inquiries and submissions to: ibero.caribbean.diaspora@gmail.com

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Resilient Bodies: Beyond the Margins of Life Writing

deadline for submissions: 

September 30, 2022

Northeast Modern Language Association

contact email: 

kasia.peric@gmail.com

Recent discussions in autobiography studies have increasingly shifted their focus to non-conventional forms of self-expression. In broader terms, life writing, which aims to reveal the self in all of its complexity, has inevitably evolved from a highly conventional genre to an open and ever-expanding practice that connects writing with other modes of representation. Discussions on autobiography have progressively become inclusive of non-literary forms of expression, such as performance, body and endurance art.

The works of artists such as Marina Abramovic, Abel Azcona, Cindy Sherman, and Sophie Calle, just to name a few, experiment with various conventions of visual and live art to push self-expression beyond the margins of writing and into the public domain. Many of these artists, such as Marina Abramovic and Abel Azcona – in particular through their “endurance art” installations – deal with themes of physical and emotional resilience to address the question of personal identity. Similarly, the performance art installations of Cindy Sherman and Sophie Calle question the stereotypes of self-representation and test the limits of autobiography by experimenting with different identities in different social contexts.

This session encourages the study of French and Francophone performance artists who work in the autobiography field which is an area that has been explored very little to date. Its purpose is to stimulate an interdisciplinary research and exchange between scholars from different fields and to promote French and Francophone art and culture.

This session welcomes interdisciplinary research that examines various forms of self-expression from different fields of inquiry such as literature, the visual and fine arts. Proposals should be submitted in 250 words max.

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Deadline for Submissions Sept. 30, 2022

Jean Monnet University, Saint-Etienne, France
 
Thursday, 11 of May 2023th and Friday, 12th of May 2023
 
“Virginia Woolf: For a Poetics & Politics of Intimacy”
 
International Conference – Société d’Études Woolfiennes

Call for Papers

Organised by ECLLA (Études du Contemporain en Littératures, Langues, Arts)

with the support of the SEW and of CORPUS (UR-UPJV 4295)


Confirmed keynote speakers:
Elsa Högberg, Uppsala University and
Christine Reynier, Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3 University



“They’ve just sent the second batch of proofs [of Passenger to Teheran] which I have swallowed at a gulp. […] I kept saying ‘How I should like to know that woman’ and then thinking ‘But I do’, and then ‘No, I don’t– not altogether the woman who writes this.’ I didn’t know the extent of your subtleties […]. Indeed it is odd that now, having read this, I have picked up a good many things I had missed in private life. What are they, I wonder, the very intimate things, one says in print? There’s a whole family of them. Its [sic] the proof to me, of being a writer, that one expresses them in print only […].” (The Letters of Virginia Woolf, vol. 3, 290-291)

This excerpt from a letter written to Vita Sackville-West on the 15th of September 1926, while Virginia Woolf was proof-reading her intimate friend’s account of journeying through Persia prior to its publication by the Hogarth Press, is a telling illustration of the rich entanglement between intimacy and writing opening onto the numerous ways in which Woolf explores this question. She expresses here the fundamental difficulty of knowing the other (even when the other is an intimate friend), which is also at the core of her reflection upon characterization, and the necessity of turning to the written word both to express one’s own mind and to grasp the subtleties of the human mind. The paradoxical necessity of going public in order to express one’s private thoughts explains Woolf’s reticence to commit herself to autobiography: “Also I’m uneasy at taking this role in the public eye – afraid of autobiography.” (TheDiary of Virginia Woolf, vol. 5, 141). Yet at the same time, intimacy is defined as being beyond words; intimacy is “knowledge” says Lily Briscoe as she conjures up the figure of Mrs Ramsay while resting her head on the woman’s lap, “but nothing that could be written in any language known to men.” (To the Lighthouse, 305). Yet again, that type of knowledge proves to be equally fallacious: “Who knows what we are, what we feel? Who knows even at the moment of intimacy? This is knowledge?” (To the Lighthouse, 390).

Expressing life, the mind (her own and the others’) is indissociable from Woolf’s modernist project to reshape the novel and injunction to both the reader of modernist fiction and the writers of her own spiritual generation to “look within.” In her effort to define “the proper stuff of fiction” she claims that the spirit of life should be conveyed with “as little mixture of the alien and external as possible,” (“Modern Fiction” Essays 4, 160) enjoining her contemporaries to stress the inward life of their characters, in keeping with the etymology of the adjective “intimate” (which stems from the Latin “interior” and from the superlative “intimus”, the most interior or the inmost.)
It is precisely with this injunction in mind that we propose to analyse intimacy and its political and ethical ramifications in Woolf’s oeuvre. For intimacy is as central to Woolf’s essays as it is to her fiction, and particularly her feminist essays. Both genres work through the political fabric of the intimate and in this respect might be seen to produce an original form of materialist feminism. Woolf’s radical endeavours flourished when she also had to navigate the atmosphere of “fear and suspicion” (VW in Marshik 3) that prevailed until the late 1920s, when censors and moralists still held a strong power over authors, printers and publishers as well as the general public (see Pease, Potter, Marshik & Pease). The literary strategies Woolf developed to circumvent censorship affect her representation of an embodied intimacy, turning the expression of the personal into an inevitably political gesture.

In A Room of One’s Own she voices women’s experiences and concerns by adopting the guise of a persona, a certain Mary Beton, giving her a woman’s body in direct contact with the issues she seeks to theorise. It is also obvious that the privacy of the room of one’s own is in fact spurious as the outside world keeps impinging upon it, just as the letter written in answer to a middle-aged educated man in Three Guineas is in fact a very public kind of address. The frontier between inside and outside, confidentiality and publicity is very porous indeed, and Woolf’s political commitment is deeply rooted in her own personal experience as an educated man’s daughter.

The question of intimacy has been central to Woolf studies and to modernist studies since the late 20th century (Bagguley and Seymour, Berlant, Frost, Illouz, Minow-Pinkney among others), but it seems to have gained momentum in recent years with the emergence of the field of affect studies, with publications ranging from Jessica Berman’s 2004 article, to Elsa Högberg’s 2020 Virginia Woolf and the Ethics of Intimacy, to Jane Goldman’s 2021 chapter in Högberg’s Modernist Intimacies. Focusing primarily on four of Woolf’s modernist novels, Högberg’s 2020 study compellingly shows that the writing of intimacy and interiority is “configured as an aesthetic, but also ethical process.” In the wake of this thinking, arguing that Woolf “places intimacy at the centre of public and political as well as private relations”, we propose to examine how Woolf’s conception of intimacy, of human relations and of the self informs not only her fiction, but also her essays, auto/ biographies, diaries and correspondence. Woolf’s texts convey an ethical and a political stance which is inseparable from her poetics foregrounding introspection in a complex nexus of tensions and paradoxes which may be expressed in terms of the Woolfian concept of “vacillation” between within and without, secrecy and revelation, concealment and disclosure, the private and the public, the personal and the impersonal, the self and the other. These questions might equally be extended to consider the reception of Woolf’s work in France and the nature of the imprint of the intimate in the French response to Woolf, as it meets contemporary feminist thinking anachronistically (see Favre, Gérard, Jones, Lasserre, Meyer)

This conference intends to bring together Woolf scholars ready to engage with the subject of intimacy from diverse theoretical standpoints. We therefore invite papers on the literary, aesthetic, ethical, political, philosophical and more broadly cultural aspects of Woolf’s œuvre, its origins, conception and reception both then and now.


Topics of interest may include, but are not limited to:

*Following the first definition one finds in the OED of the word “intimacy” as “the state of being personally intimate, intimate friendship or acquaintance, familiar intercourse, close familiarity”: relationship between Virginia Woolf and Bloomsbury; an ethics of intimacy. Influence of George Moore’s Principia Ethica, the “Memoir Club contributions”, the Bloomsbury group founded on the idea of friendship and truth telling. Thursday evenings as a catalyst for the group’s politics of style. In connection with the new domesticity invented by Bloomsbury, one could also look at real or imaginary places of intimacy, Hyde Park Gate, Monk’s House, Charleston, etc.

Virginia Woolf and friends/family: emulation and influence of Leslie Stephen, Lytton Strachey, Vanessa and Clive Bell, Roger Fry, etc. Role played by Leonard Woolf in her literary career, in furthering her fame even posthumously (the way he shaped her diaries in A Writer’s Diary, how he represented her in his own lengthy autobiography). The Hogarth Press and its impact on Woolf’s work.
*Life-writing and autobiography: how to represent the other’s/one’s own intimacy. How Woolf’s conception of intimacy led her to revolutionize biography: the New Biography and her poetics of the individual. Diary writing vs letter writing: confessional aspect of these laboratories of the self and of her fiction.

Role played by the editors of her correspondence/diaries, by her biographers, in shaping an “intimate” Woolf. The way her papers were published (trimmed and censored or published in their entirety), the way we are given access to Woolf’s innermost thoughts and what different literary critical periods have made of them, what these editorial processes say about Woolf, but also about our own reception of her texts/images and about our own era.

*The fascination exerted by Woolf’s intimacy in recent works “recycling” her: her madness, her same-sex friendships are presented as a filter through which we are invited to read her fiction and essays. The way novelists have used her life as an inspiration; the modernist icon revisited (cf. The White Garden, a Novel of Virginia Woolf by Stephanie Barron, The Hours by Peter Cunningham or the recent movie Vita and Virginia, which, although they give a fictional, warped, partial and possibly erroneous version of Woolf, nevertheless add a complementary touch to the way Woolf is seen as part of the canon).

*Woolf’s photographic practice and conception of photography: Reticence towards self-portrayal and intimacy but photography as a necessary means to record private daily life. Visual apprehension of the self/of the other, role of her albums in her creation of a family romance. Link with Julia Margaret Cameron, role of her father’s Mausoleum Book in creating a visual genealogy redefining familiarity.
*Woolf’s aesthetic experiments and post-impressionism: towards an embodied formalism.

*Corporeality, body and mind, the question of “incarnation”: how intimacy, love, the body are represented, or transcended, negated or circumvented but always fundamental in her oeuvre as sensory experience is seen as necessary to artistic creation. The imprint of the intimate in contemporary readings of Woolf and feminist responses to Woolf.

*Woolf’s feminism as deriving from her ethics of intimacy, link between political space and private space. A Room of One’s Own and Three Guineas: the narrator is embodied, telling her story rather than his story, the personal is political: gender and sex, the androgynous mind as the naturally creative mind. Giving voice to women’s private experiences.

*Literature and psychoanalysis: relationship with Freudian psychoanalysis, simultaneous development of modern psychology, psychiatry, psychoanalysis and literary modernism. Resonances with Lacan’s concept of “extimité.” Woolf’s fiction as exploration of the unconscious (cf. “Modern Fiction” in which she claims that her generation should explore “the dark places of psychology.” (Essays 4, 162). Links with Kristeva’s definition of intimacy as a “continuous copresence between the sensible and the intelligible – a true continuity, beyond division.” (Intimate Revolt, 47)

*Intimacy also means “closeness of observation, knowledge or the like” (cf. OED definition 1c) which may trigger reflections upon the intimacy between reader and writer: the reader’s affective investment in the novel’s content, link with the theory of reception. Intersection between the reader’s quest for meaning and the narrator’s quest for character. How reading and writing as intimate acts are possibly conducive to politically subversive acts of revolt. Woolf’s own practice as a reader, reviewer, and its effects on her writing.
*Modernizing characterization: “Life and the Novelist” or how to express the character’s interiority, how to cope with the unknowability of the other in a creative way. Woolf’s “tunnelling process” and her “digging out beautiful caves.” (Diary 2, 272, 263).
*Intimacy and modernism: looking within, expressing the modernist inward strand. The stylistic revolution of the stream of consciousness in promoting interiority, introspection and free indirect speech as a mode of intimate story-telling and in the twenties circumventing censorship.

We welcome proposals for papers preferably in English on the above-mentioned topics or any other topic which you may find relevant to the theme of the conference.

Please send abstracts of about 300 words together with a short biographical notice to woolfintimacy@gmail.com by 30th September 2022.
Notifications of acceptance will be sent by 15th  November 2022.


Contact :

Floriane Reviron-Piégay floriane.reviron.piegay@univ-st-etienne.fr
Anne-Marie Smith-Di Biasio annemarie.dibiasio@gmail.com


Scientific committee:

Elizabeth Abel (University of California, Berkeley)
Catherine Bernard (Paris-Cité)
Anne Besnault (Rouen)
Rachel Bowlby (University College London)
Adèle Cassigneul (Toulouse)
Claire Davison (Sorbonne Nouvelle)
Chantal Delourme (Paris-Nanterre)
Nadia Fusini (La Sapienza, Rome)
Maggie Humm (East London)
Mark Hussey (Pace University-New York)
Catherine Lanone (Sorbonne Nouvelle)
Marie Laniel (Picardie, Jules Verne)
Frédéric Regard (Paris-Sorbonne)
Floriane Reviron-Piégay (Jean Monnet, St Etienne)
Anne-Marie Smith-Di Biasio (Institut Catholique de Paris)


Works of reference:

BERLANT, Lauren. Intimacy. Chicago: U of Chicago Press, 2000.
BERMAN, Jessica. “Ethical Folds: Ethics; Aesthetics, Woolf,” MFS: Modern Fiction Studies, vol. 50, n°. 1, Spring 2004, pp. 151-72.
BERSANI, Leo & PHILLIPS, Adam. Intimacies. Chicago: U of Chicago Press, 2008.
DELOURME, Chantal. Et une phrase… Virginia Woolf, écrire dans l’entre-deux-guerres. Paris : ENS Éditions, 2021.
FAVRE, Valérie. Virginia Woolf et ses “petites sœurs” : Relire A Room of One’s Own au prisme de sa postérité littéraire, critique et féministe dans l’espace atlantique anglophone des années soixante à nos jours, PhD Dissertation, Lyon 2, 2021.

GÉRARD, Valérie. Les Formes du chaos : sur l’art politique de V. Woolf. MF Éditions, 2022.
GOLDMAN, Jane. “Burning Feminism: Virginia Woolf’s Laboratory of Intimacy” in HÖGBERG, Elsa, ed., Modernist Intimacies. Edinburgh: Edinburgh UP, 2021, pp. 52-73.
HÖGBERG, Elsa. Virginia Woolf and the Ethics of Intimacy. London: Bloomsbury, 2020.
—, ed. Modernist Intimacies. Edinburgh: Edinburgh UP, 2021.
HUMM, Maggie. Talland House: A Novel. Berkeley, CA: She Writes Press, 2020.
ILLOUZ, Eva. Cold Intimacies: The Making of Emotional Capitalism. London: Polity Press, 2007.
JONES, Clara. Virginia Woolf: Ambivalent Activist. Edinburgh: Edinburgh UP, 2017.
KRISTEVA, Julia. Intimate Revolt. The Powers and Limits of Psychoanalysis, 1997. Trans. HERMAN, Jeanine. New York: Columbia UP, 2002.
LASSERRE, Audrey. Histoire d’une littérature en mouvement : textes, écrivaines et collectifs éditoriaux du Mouvement de libération des femmes en France (1970-1981), PhD Dissertation, Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris 3, 2014.
LIGHT, Alison. Mrs. Woolf and the Servants: An Intimate History of Domestic Life in Bloomsbury. London: Penguin Books, 2007.
MARSHIK, Celia.  British Modernism and Censorship. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2006.
MARSHIK, C. & PEASE, A. Modernism, Sex, and Gender. London: Bloomsbury, 2019.
MEYER, Suzel. Écrire l’histoire au féminin : autour de The Years de Virginia Woolf et des Années d’Annie Ernaux, PhD Dissertation, Strasbourg, 2020.
MINOW-PINKNEY, Makiko. Virginia Woolf and the Problem of the Subject: Feminine Writing in the Major Novels. New Brunswick, N. J.: Rutgers UP, 1987.
PEASE, Allison. Modernism, Mass Culture, and the Aesthetics of Obscenity. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2000.
POTTER, Rachel. Obscene Modernism. Literary Censorship & Experiment 1900-1940. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2013.
REYNIER, Christine. Virginia Woolf’s “Good Housekeeping” Essays. New York and London: Routledge, 2019.
SANGER, Tam & TAYLOR, Yvette, eds. Mapping Intimacies: Relations, Exchanges, Affects. London: Palgrave Macmillan 2013.
SEYMOUR, Julie & BAGGULEY, Paul, eds. Relating Intimacies: Power and Resistance. London: Macmillan, 1999.
WOLFE, Jesse. Bloomsbury, Modernism and the Reinvention of Intimacy. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2011.

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Disobedient Lives, Disorderly Archives: Social Justice Agency in Archival Spaces and Arts

ROUND TABLE at the 54th Annual NEMLA (Northeast Modern Language Association) Convention, to be held March 23rd-26th in Niagara Falls, NY, US.

deadline for submissions: 

September 30, 2022

contact email: 

jlmason1@buffalo.edu

Abstract: This roundtable will bring together scholars interested in developing and studying archives that push the boundaries of what we consider the archive. At the roundtable, through our work, we will consider questions that arise within archival practices and arts, such as: what constitutes or counts as an archive, what kinds of archival delineations should be drawn, pushed back against, or ruptured, and, perhaps most importantly, what is or should be the role of the archive in combating systemic injustice and advancing social justice? The roundtable seeks to bring together scholars across disciplines and community activists and archivists who are interested in the relationship between social justice activism and the archive, those who are building archives or deconstructing archives or imagining new and different archives with the goal of helping communities and those whose lives have been hidden or suppressed or ignored completely within archives.Archivist-activists and scholars interested in the political and social role of the archive, especially those whose projects are geared toward utilizing the archive as mechanism or space for social justice activism are invited to submit proposals that demonstrate the connection between their social justice concerns and their archival work and interests. The roundtable will be geared toward scholars and activists engaging the archive, in both material, corporeal and immaterial, conceptual senses. It will allow archivists and scholar-activists alike to come together to share and make wisdom concerning the use of the archive as a space for shaping and advancing social change, and for changing the social and material conditions of communities that have been marginalized, historically.
 

LINK to CFP/to submit: https://cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/1979

Contact: jlmason1@buffalo.edu

Organizers/Co-Chairs: Nicole Crevar and Jessica Lowell Mason

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The Art of Non/Resilience for People with Disabilities
 

Northeast Modern Language Association Conference

March 23-26, 2023. Niagara Falls, NY

deadline for submissions: 

September 30, 2022

contact email: 

mariaguarino07@gmail.com

Submit abstract here: https://cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/20018

What is resilience for people with disabilities? What is recovery? 

Narratives of illness, trauma and disability are often framed to emphasize recovery. Reflecting on resiliency, constructed ideas of normalcy, and “crip time,” Ellen Samuels writes: “Disability and illness have the power to extract us from linear, progressive time with its normative life stages and cast us into a wormhole of backward and forward acceleration, jerky stops and starts, tedious intervals and abrupt endings” (2017). 

In working with disabled performers, disability scholar and artist Petra Kuppers notes the connection between the material oppression experienced by people with disabilities and the performance space. She writes:

“Many of the performers’ physical experiences mirrored their silencing in, and exclusion from, representation. Some had no space for themselves, their bodies, their movements in the social and physical environment. They are excluded from life alone, from getting an apartment; conformed to a timetable of contact with medical practitioners, or the even more rigorous timetable of pills and injection. Their bodies can be invaded, as the law allows them to be drugged against their will and involuntarily hospitalized. Their physical and mental privacy is often under threat” (2005).

Kuppers suggests there may be an added level of invisibility for people with disabilities because of the likely invasion of privacy through the process of disclosure. In offering up this context, Kuppers raises many questions about the production and spectacle of arts by people with disabilities. How do we see disability? How can we understand the tension of disclosure and hypervisibility? How do we build safer and more comfortable spaces for people with disabilities to present their art? How do relationships change after disclosure, and/or how do we recognize the need to pivot in states of crisis and illness? How do we recognize the work of disability artists? 

In his poem, “I am too pretty for some Ugly Laws,” Lateef McLeod speaks to these experiences of both invisibility, hypervisibility, and historical oppression. He says: “My mere presence//of erratic moving limbs//and drooling smile//used to be scrubbed off the public pavement” (2018).

Through writing, poetry, acting, and many other mediums, we have the opportunity to convert the disabled bodymind from being solely what disabled performer Catherine Cole calls a “performer in a script [they] did not write” (2003). We can engage further and sit, stand, walk, seize, lay, etc in these spaces of disability, and ask what resilience and recovery means. We can also ask not only how disabled bodyminds are resilient, but how they are not.

This is a call for creative submissions that explore representations of disability, resilience, and recovery. Submissions can include, but are not limited to: poetry, art, film etc. What is resilience? What is recovery?

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Deadline for Submissions Sept. 30, 2022

Call for Chapter Contributions

Diaspora/Diasporas: Cross-cultural Ibero-Caribbean Texts and Context
Editors: Irene M. F. Blayer (PhD), Brock University; Jo-Anne Ferreira (PhD), UWI Trinidad and Tobago; Dulce M. S. Scott (PhD), Anderson University
 
We envision this edited collection to be interdisciplinary and multidimensional, thus incorporating a set of diasporic areas of research within the Ibero-Caribbean context. Chapters are double-blind peer refereed. An invitation to submit a paper in no way guarantees that the paper will be published; this is dependent on the review process. Unpublished and original papers, in English, Portuguese, Spanish, or French are welcome. Proposals that treat other topics not included below but that are of thematic relevance are welcome.

  • Storying the Ibero-Caribbean diaspora
  • Cultural histories in the context of diasporas and globalization
  • Place, history and collective memories /
  • Textualized identity
  • Testimonies, diaries, chronicles, letters, autobiographies
  • Migration and identity: the role of geographical place 
  • The diasporic imaginary: Self in the textual narrative
  • Interfacing literary dialogues
  • Circulation and reception of diaspora literature
  • Bilingualism and multilingualism
  • Language and cultural identity
  • Translation and the trials of identity
  • Tradition and social change
  • Material and non-material culture
  • Sociology and psychology of the migrant experience
  • Oral vs. written narratives
  • Cross-generational narratives/ diaries, chronicles, letters 
  • The economics of language policy in immigration
  • Language, dislocation, and exile
  • Cross-generational narratives
  • Ethnography of language
  • Re-imagining Ibero-American Insular spaces/worlds

Submissions
The deadline for the receipt of abstracts (450-500 words) and a biographical note (300-350 words) is September 30, 2022.  Those invited to submit full chapters will be notified by December 30th, 2022.  
Complete chapter drafts should be approximately 4,500-6,500 words including endnotes and bibliography. Chapters must follow the MLA style rules, and will be due June 30, 2023. 
Prospective contributors should email all inquiries and submissions to: ibero.caribbean.diaspora@gmail.com

Dear all,

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Call for Papers: “Am I Invisible?” Voices Society Silences  

deadlines for submissions: 

October 15, 2022 (Pre-Submission Ideas, Proposals, and Abstracts Deadline)

November 15, 2022 (Deadline for Drafts) 

contact email: 

SurviveAndThriveHealing@gmail.com 

In this special issue of _Survive and Thrive: A Journal for Medical Humanities and Narrative Medicine_ (Vol. 8, slated for publication 2023; full schedule below), we ask students, educators, caregivers, victims/survivors, advocates, first responders, and all others who feel they are invisible to bring light to their experiences for others to see. 

In an era of “me first” and social media filters that make snapshots seem like a perfect life–it is easy for people to feel and question if they are invisible in their pain. It is easy for people to feel the weight of society silencing your cries for help, and the increasing burden making the air too heavy to breathe. We seek to provide a microphone for those who wish to lighten their weight by acknowledging their experiences, to help others feel validated in knowing they are not alone, and to help folks know they are not invisible.

In this project, we are inspired by the work of the What They Don’t Tell You About Being a Survivor podcast (available at https://menaspeacemakers.podbean.com/), whose mission is to empower survivors/victims, and help people know they are not alone in what they are going through. The types of traumas discussed on the podcast are not limited to any specific type of trauma. 

Contributors might explore these questions and other questions of their own: 

  • What would I say if the world would listen?
  • What would I share if I didn’t fear the shame of ____?
  • What would I say to those who are starting the journey, I am healing from?
  • What is my story from trauma to healing?
  • How might my journey have gone if people would have helped me when I needed it?
  • What makes me feel invisible while in plain sight?
  • What lies beneath the mask I feel obliged to wear?
  • What is it society silences me from saying about___?
  • How can I help others who are enduring what I have?
  • How can we help others from experiencing the trauma I am?
  • What has healing been like for me?
  • How does my trauma weigh me down still?
  • What they don’t tell you about being a survivor?

We especially would like to hear from people who have/are experiencing trauma (please note: authors can use a pseudonym). The truth is that the majority of us have or will experience trauma; the unfortunate truth is also that people tell us our trauma is not actually trauma. Trauma is trauma, and we want to help folks know they are not invisible, that we see you and you are not alone. We also want to give hope to others through sharing the journey of healing. Providing validation for those who might be hearing “It’s in the past move on.” or something else that minimizes their experience(s). Not asking folks to reopen wounds, but rather name them and share how the trauma has impacted your life. We encourage folks to share the ups and downs of their personal story on surviving and thriving. 

SUBMISSION DEADLINE

-October 15, 2022:  Deadline for Ideas, Proposals, and Abstracts.  Authors who submit by October 15 will receive early feedback to help them grow, expand and develop ideas.

Submit to: SurviveAndThriveHealing@gmail.com and to dbeard@d.umn.edu

-November 15th, 2022:  Deadline for Completed Work.  You do not need to have submitted an abstract to submit work on this deadline.

Submit to: https://repository.stcloudstate.edu/survive_thrive/ 

Summer 2023:  Projected Publication

SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS

“Submissions” may include text (poetry, essay, creative nonfiction, scholarly argument) video, audio, or image files that express the aims and scope of the journal. Submissions cannot have been previously published.

A FEW SUGGESTED READINGS, in alphabetical order:

ABOUT SURVIVE AND THRIVE: A JOURNAL FOR MEDICAL HUMANITIES AND NARRATIVE AS MEDICINE

Survive & Thrive: A Journal for Medical Humanities and Narrative as Medicine aims to provide opportunities for sharing research, artistic work, pedagogical dialogue, and the practices of medical humanities and narrative as medicine. The journal serves a mission in education and the practice of humanities as they relate to illness, injury, and trauma. One of the primary aims of the journal is to bring medical humanities and narrative medicine to patients, survivors, and caregivers. Its emphasis, therefore, is on patients and survivors and their needs, and while aware of and supporting professional medical education, the journal is most concerned with an audience broader than an academic audience. We encourage physicians and others in the medical profession to practice Narrative as Medicine by submitting their work, especially when it encourages them to be artists – visual, performance, and literary. 

Project co-edited by:

Laura Anderson, SurviveAndThriveHealing@gmail.com

David Beard, DBeard@d.umn.edu 

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Deadline for Submissions October 15, 2022

I am thrilled to announce that my fabulous colleague Tripthi Pillai and I are co-editing a new Routledge Companion to Global Women’s Writing (to be published in summer 2024). Please see the cfp below, consider sending us an abstract, and/or share widely with your networks!

Routledge Companion to Global Women’s Writing 
Editors: Tripthi Pillai and Ina Seethaler 

We invite abstracts for chapters of previously unpublished and original work to be included in the new Routledge Companion to Global Women’s Writing, which is under contract to be published in July 2024 as part of the Routledge Literature Companions series. 
Covering both established and emerging topics and methodologies, The Routledge Companion to Global Women’s Writing equips readers with interdisciplinary and intersectional approaches to women’s writing in the global context. Movements and experiences shaping the twenty-first century assert the urgent need for expanding and re-envisioning existing academic and social definitions as well as cultural perceptions of gender, location, and creative expression. In response to this growing need felt by diverse communities across the world, the collection forges new directions in and conceptualizations of identity, experience, and practice. Specifically, we welcome contributions that engage the three principle aspects informing the collection—“global,” “women,” and “writing”—in inclusive ways that not only broaden readers’ understanding of these key identities and concepts but also enable them to explore the underappreciated connections among them. Towards this end, the editors seek a multiplicity of voices from a variety of disciplines and geocultural landscapes. Similarly, we welcome with enthusiasm diverse perspectives, positionalities, and approaches, ranging from commentary on dominant/key debates to exploratory work on budding and innovative practices of global women’s writing.  
Each section of the handbook offers a broad range of topics that are globally applicable and provide critical and creative access to the nexus of women’s writing.  
Possible sections and topics include but are not limited to: 

  1. Bodies: 
    1. Disability and women’s self-expression 
    2. Global perspectives on healthcare 
    3. Spirituality, religion, and ritual  
    4. Transgender poetics and politics 
       
  2. Locations: 
    1. Language, borders, and migration 
    2. Domesticity and negotiations of home 
    3. Ecologies and environments 
    4. Carceral experiences  
       
  3. Media Landscapes: 
    1. Body art as authorship and activism 
    2. Graphic writings 
    3. Women in gaming 
    4. Social media and global communication  
       
  4. Disruptive Canvases:  
    1. Textiles as texts  
    2. Storytelling through graffiti/murals/poster art  
    3. Global foodways 
    4. Artifacts and experiences of war 
       
  5. Movements of Resistance: 
    1. Global writing and #metoo 
    2. Grassroots activism and movements 
    3. Education and liberatory/oppressive practices  
    4. Law, justice, and policy
    5.  

We are especially interested in contributions from authors at various stages of their careers who embrace interdisciplinary approaches and/or adopt practices of citational justice.  
Please send an abstract of up to 350 words as well as a 200-word biography to tpillai@coastal.edu and iseethale@coastal.edu by October 15, 2022. Contributors will be notified by 15 November 2022 of their abstracts’ acceptance. Completed chapters of up to 6000 words will be expected by May 15, 2023. Some flexibility exists regarding word count, especially in the case of contributions that discuss non-dominant identities, geographies, and/or writing practices. Feel free to reach out to the editors with any queries.  

Ina C. Seethaler, Ph.D. (she, her, hers)

Associate Professor/Director of Women’s and Gender Studies

HTC Honors College
Coastal Carolina University
Kearns 104B
PO Box 261954, Conway, SC 29528
iseethale@coastal.edu
843-349-6919

The land on which Coastal Carolina University stands is part of the traditional territory of the Waccamaw Indian People.

We honor them and express our gratitude to the ancestors who lived here in the past,

the Waccamaw Indian People today, and the generations to come.

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Call for Papers

STARDOM AND FANDOM

Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA)

44th Annual Conference, February 22-25, 2023

Marriott Albuquerque

Albuquerque, New Mexico

http://www.southwestpca.org

Submissions open on August 15, 2022

Proposal submission deadline: October 31, 2022

Proposals for papers and panels are now being accepted for the 44th annual SWPACA conference. One of the nation’s largest interdisciplinary academic conferences, SWPACA offers nearly 70 subject areas, each typically featuring multiple panels.  For a full list of subject areas, area descriptions, and Area Chairs, please visit http://southwestpca.org/conference/call-for-papers/

The Area Chair for Stardom and Fandom invites paper or panel proposals on any aspect of stardom or fandom. The list of ideas below is limited, so if you have an idea that is not listed, please suggest the new topic. We are an interdisciplinary area and encourage submissions from multiple perspectives and disciplines. Topics might include:

Studies of individual celebrities and their fans, both current and historical

Studies focused on specific fandoms – films, television programs, books, bands, etc.

Fandom and loss – how fans cope when beloved things come to an end

The reciprocal relationship between stars and fans

Impact of celebrity and fame on identity construction, reconstruction and sense of self

Reality television, YouTube celebrities, Influencers and the changing definition of ‘stardom’

The impact of social media and various platforms on celebrity/fan interaction

Celebrity/fame addiction as cultural change

The intersection of stars and fans in virtual and physical spaces (Twitter, Tumblr, TikTok, conventions)

Celebrity and the construction of persona

Pedagogical approaches to teaching stardom and fandom

Fans, Stans, Antis and ‘haters’

Fan shame, wank, fandom policing, and purity culture in fandom spaces

Gendered constructions of stars and fans

Historical studies of fandom and fan/celebrity interaction

All proposals must be submitted through the conference’s database at http://register.southwestpca.org/southwestpca

For details on using the submission database and on the application process in general, please see the Proposal Submission FAQs and Tips page at http://southwestpca.org/conference/faqs-and-tips/

Individual proposals for 15-minute papers must include an abstract of approximately 200-500 words. Including a brief bio in the body of the proposal form is encouraged, but not required.  

For information on how to submit a proposal for a roundtable or a multi-paper panel, please view the above FAQs and Tips page.  

The deadline for submissions is October 31, 2022.  

SWPACA offers monetary awards for the best graduate student papers in a variety of categories. Submissions of accepted, full papers are due January 1, 2023.  SWPACA also offers travel fellowships for undergraduate and graduate students. For more information, visit http://southwestpca.org/conference/graduate-student-awards/

Registration and travel information for the conference will be available at http://southwestpca.org/conference/conference-registration-information/.

For 2023, we are excited to be at a new venue, the Marriott Albuquerque (2101 Louisiana Blvd NE, Albuquerque NM 87110), which boasts free parking and close proximity to dining, shopping and other delights. In addition, please check out the organization’s peer-reviewed, scholarly journal, Dialogue: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Popular Culture and Pedagogy, at http://journaldialogue.org/

If you have any questions about the Stardom and Fandom area, please contact its Area Chair, Dr. Lynn Zubernis, Professor, West Chester University, at lzubernis@wcupa.edu. If you have general questions about the conference, please contact us at support@southwestpca.org, and a member of the executive team will get back to you.

We look forward to receiving your submissions!

Contact Info: 

Lynn Zubernis, PhD

Professor, West Chester University

1160 McDermott Drive, Ste 102

West Chester PA 19380

Contact Email: 

lzubernis@wcupa.edu

URL: 

http://www.southwestpca.org

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Deadline for Submissions October 31, 2022

International Conference

“Virginia Woolf: For a Poetics & Politics of Intimacy”
 
 
Jean Monnet University, Saint-Etienne, France
Organised by ECLLA (Études du Contemporain en Littératures, Langues, Arts)
with the support of the French Society of Woolfian Studies and of CORPUS (UR-UPJV 4295)
 
Thursday, 11th of May 2023 and Friday, 12th of May 2023
 
 
Confirmed keynote speakers:
Elsa Högberg, Uppsala University and
Christine Reynier, Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3 University
 
 
“They’ve just sent the second batch of proofs [of Passenger to Teheran] which I have swallowed at a gulp. […] I kept saying ‘How I should like to know that woman’ and then thinking ‘But I do’, and then ‘No, I don’t– not altogether the woman who writes this.’ I didn’t know the extent of your subtleties […]. Indeed it is odd that now, having read this, I have picked up a good many things I had missed in private life. What are they, I wonder, the very intimate things, one says in print? There’s a whole family of them. Its [sic] the proof to me, of being a writer, that one expresses them in print only […].” (The Letters of Virginia Woolf, vol. 3, 290-291)
This excerpt from a letter written to Vita Sackville-West on the 15th of September 1926, while Virginia Woolf was proof-reading her intimate friend’s account of journeying through Persia prior to its publication by the Hogarth Press, is a telling illustration of the rich entanglement between intimacy and writing opening onto the numerous ways in which Woolf explores this question. She expresses here the fundamental difficulty of knowing the other (even when the other is an intimate friend), which is also at the core of her reflection upon characterization, and the necessity of turning to the written word both to express one’s own mind and to grasp the subtleties of the human mind. The paradoxical necessity of going public in order to express one’s private thoughts explains Woolf’s reticence to commit herself to autobiography: “Also I’m uneasy at taking this role in the public eye – afraid of autobiography.” (The Diary of Virginia Woolf, vol. 5, 141). Yet at the same time, intimacy is defined as being beyond words; intimacy is “knowledge” says Lily Briscoe as she conjures up the figure of Mrs Ramsay while resting her head on the woman’s lap, “but nothing that could be written in any language known to men.” (To the Lighthouse, 305). Yet again, that type of knowledge proves to be equally fallacious: “Who knows what we are, what we feel? Who knows even at the moment of intimacy? This is knowledge?” (To the Lighthouse, 390).
Expressing life, the mind (her own and the others’) is indissociable from Woolf’s modernist project to reshape the novel and injunction to both the reader of modernist fiction and the writers of her own spiritual generation to “look within.” In her effort to define “the proper stuff of fiction” she claims that the spirit of life should be conveyed with “as little mixture of the alien and external as possible,” (“Modern Fiction” Essays 4, 160) enjoining her contemporaries to stress the inward life of their characters, in keeping with the etymology of the adjective “intimate” (which stems from the Latin “interior” and from the superlative “intimus”, the most interior or the inmost.)
It is precisely with this injunction in mind that we propose to analyse intimacy and its political and ethical ramifications in Woolf’s oeuvre. For intimacy is as central to Woolf’s essays as it is to her fiction, and particularly her feminist essays. Both genres work through the political fabric of the intimate and in this respect might be seen to produce an original form of materialist feminism. Woolf’s radical endeavours flourished when she also had to navigate the atmosphere of “fear and suspicion” (VW in Marshik 3) that prevailed until the late 1920s, when censors and moralists still held a strong power over authors, printers and publishers as well as the general public (see Pease, Potter, Marshik & Pease). The literary strategies Woolf developed to circumvent censorship affect her representation of an embodied intimacy, turning the expression of the personal into an inevitably political gesture.
In A Room of One’s Own she voices women’s experiences and concerns by adopting the guise of a persona, a certain Mary Beton, giving her a woman’s body in direct contact with the issues she seeks to theorise. It is also obvious that the privacy of the room of one’s own is in fact spurious as the outside world keeps impinging upon it, just as the letter written in answer to a middle-aged educated man in Three Guineas is in fact a very public kind of address. The frontier between inside and outside, confidentiality and publicity is very porous indeed, and Woolf’s political commitment is deeply rooted in her own personal experience as an educated man’s daughter.
The question of intimacy has been central to Woolf studies and to modernist studies since the late 20th century (Bagguley and Seymour, Berlant, Frost, Illouz, Minow-Pinkney among others), but it seems to have gained momentum in recent years with the emergence of the field of affect studies, with publications ranging from Jessica Berman’s 2004 article, to Elsa Högberg’s 2020 Virginia Woolf and the Ethics of Intimacy, to Jane Goldman’s 2021 chapter in Högberg’s Modernist Intimacies. Focusing primarily on four of Woolf’s modernist novels, Högberg’s 2020 study compellingly shows that the writing of intimacy and interiority is “configured as an aesthetic, but also ethical process.” In the wake of this thinking, arguing that Woolf “places intimacy at the centre of public and political as well as private relations”, we propose to examine how Woolf’s conception of intimacy, of human relations and of the self informs not only her fiction, but also her essays, auto/ biographies, diaries and correspondence. Woolf’s texts convey an ethical and a political stance which is inseparable from her poetics foregrounding introspection in a complex nexus of tensions and paradoxes which may be expressed in terms of the Woolfian concept of “vacillation” between within and without, secrecy and revelation, concealment and disclosure, the private and the public, the personal and the impersonal, the self and the other. These questions might equally be extended to consider the reception of Woolf’s work in France and the nature of the imprint of the intimate in the French response to Woolf, as it meets contemporary feminist thinking anachronistically (see Favre, Gérard, Jones, Lasserre, Meyer)
This conference intends to bring together Woolf scholars ready to engage with the subject of intimacy from diverse theoretical standpoints. We therefore invite papers on the literary, aesthetic, ethical, political, philosophical and more broadly cultural aspects of Woolf’s œuvre, its origins, conception and reception both then and now.
 
 
Topics of interest may include, but are not limited to:
 
*Following the first definition one finds in the OED of the word “intimacy” as “the state of being personally intimate, intimate friendship or acquaintance, familiar intercourse, close familiarity”: relationship between Virginia Woolf and Bloomsbury; an ethics of intimacy. Influence of George Moore’s Principia Ethica, the “Memoir Club contributions”, the Bloomsbury group founded on the idea of friendship and truth telling. Thursday evenings as a catalyst for the group’s politics of style. In connection with the new domesticity invented by Bloomsbury, one could also look at real or imaginary places of intimacy, Hyde Park Gate, Monk’s House, Charleston, etc.
Virginia Woolf and friends/family: emulation and influence of Leslie Stephen, Lytton Strachey, Vanessa and Clive Bell, Roger Fry, etc. Role played by Leonard Woolf in her literary career, in furthering her fame even posthumously (the way he shaped her diaries in A Writer’s Diary, how he represented her in his own lengthy autobiography). The Hogarth Press and its impact on Woolf’s work.
*Life-writing and autobiography: how to represent the other’s/one’s own intimacy. How Woolf’s conception of intimacy led her to revolutionize biography: the New Biography and her poetics of the individual. Diary writing vs letter writing: confessional aspect of these laboratories of the self and of her fiction.
Role played by the editors of her correspondence/diaries, by her biographers, in shaping an “intimate” Woolf. The way her papers were published (trimmed and censored or published in their entirety), the way we are given access to Woolf’s innermost thoughts and what different literary critical periods have made of them, what these editorial processes say about Woolf, but also about our own reception of her texts/images and about our own era.
*The fascination exerted by Woolf’s intimacy in recent works “recycling” her: her madness, her same-sex friendships are presented as a filter through which we are invited to read her fiction and essays. The way novelists have used her life as an inspiration; the modernist icon revisited (cf. The White Garden, a Novel of Virginia Woolf by Stephanie Barron, The Hours by Peter Cunningham or the recent movie Vita and Virginia, which, although they give a fictional, warped, partial and possibly erroneous version of Woolf, nevertheless add a complementary touch to the way Woolf is seen as part of the canon).
*Woolf’s photographic practice and conception of photography: Reticence towards self-portrayal and intimacy but photography as a necessary means to record private daily life. Visual apprehension of the self/of the other, role of her albums in her creation of a family romance. Link with Julia Margaret Cameron, role of her father’s Mausoleum Book in creating a visual genealogy redefining familiarity.
*Woolf’s aesthetic experiments and post-impressionism: towards an embodied formalism.
*Corporeality, body and mind, the question of “incarnation”: how intimacy, love, the body are represented, or transcended, negated or circumvented but always fundamental in her oeuvre as sensory experience is seen as necessary to artistic creation. The imprint of the intimate in contemporary readings of Woolf and feminist responses to Woolf.
*Woolf’s feminism as deriving from her ethics of intimacy, link between political space and private space. A Room of One’s Own and Three Guineas: the narrator is embodied, telling her story rather than his story, the personal is political: gender and sex, the androgynous mind as the naturally creative mind. Giving voice to women’s private experiences.
*Literature and psychoanalysis: relationship with Freudian psychoanalysis, simultaneous development of modern psychology, psychiatry, psychoanalysis and literary modernism. Resonances with Lacan’s concept of “extimité.” Woolf’s fiction as exploration of the unconscious (cf. “Modern Fiction” in which she claims that her generation should explore “the dark places of psychology.” (Essays 4, 162). Links with Kristeva’s definition of intimacy as a “continuous copresence between the sensible and the intelligible – a true continuity, beyond division.” (Intimate Revolt, 47)
*Intimacy also means “closeness of observation, knowledge or the like” (cf. OED definition 1c) which may trigger reflections upon the intimacy between reader and writer: the reader’s affective investment in the novel’s content, link with the theory of reception. Intersection between the reader’s quest for meaning and the narrator’s quest for character. How reading and writing as intimate acts are possibly conducive to politically subversive acts of revolt. Woolf’s own practice as a reader, reviewer, and its effects on her writing.
*Modernizing characterization: “Life and the Novelist” or how to express the character’s interiority, how to cope with the unknowability of the other in a creative way. Woolf’s “tunnelling process” and her “digging out beautiful caves.” (Diary 2, 272, 263).
*Intimacy and modernism: looking within, expressing the modernist inward strand. The stylistic revolution of the stream of consciousness in promoting interiority, introspection and free indirect speech as a mode of intimate story-telling and in the twenties circumventing censorship.
We welcome proposals for papers preferably in English on the above-mentioned topics or any other topic which you may find relevant to the theme of the conference.
 
Please send abstracts of about 300 words together with a short biographical notice to woolfintimacy@gmail.com by 31st October 2022.
Notifications of acceptance will be sent by 15th December 2022.
 
 
Contact :
 
Floriane Reviron-Piégay floriane.reviron.piegay@univ-st-etienne.fr
Anne-Marie Smith-Di Biasio annemarie.dibiasio@gmail.com
 
Scientific committee:
 
Elizabeth Abel (University of California, Berkeley)
Anne Béchart-Léauté (Jean Monnet, St Etienne)
Catherine Bernard (Paris-Cité)
Anne Besnault (Rouen)
Rachel Bowlby (University College London)
Adèle Cassigneul (Toulouse)
Rémi Digonnet (Jean Monnet, St Etienne)
Claire Davison (Sorbonne Nouvelle)
Chantal Delourme (Paris-Nanterre)
Nadia Fusini (La Sapienza, Rome)
Maggie Humm (East London)
Mark Hussey (Pace University-New York)
Catherine Lanone (Sorbonne Nouvelle)
Marie Laniel (Picardie, Jules Verne)
Frédéric Regard (Paris-Sorbonne)
Floriane Reviron-Piégay (Jean Monnet, St Etienne)
Anne-Marie Smith-Di Biasio (Institut Catholique de Paris)
 

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Deadline for Submissions Oct. 31, 2022

Call for Papers
Narrative Matters Conference 2023
Instrumental Narratives: Narrative Studies and the Storytelling Boom
Tampere University, Finland, 15–17 June 2023
https://events.tuni.fi/narrativematters2023/

Welcome to the 11th Narrative Matters conference at Tampere!

The eleventh Narrative Matters conference is hosted by Tampere University (Finland) and co-organized by the Instrumental Narratives consortium project, SELMA: Centre for the Study of Storytelling, Experientiality and Memory, and Narrare: Centre for Interdisciplinary Narrative Studies.

The conference positions narrative scholars in the midst of the storytelling boom. Everyone is urged to share their story today, from consumers to multinational corporations, from private citizens to nation states. Storytelling consultants are thriving in today’s storytelling economy, but where are narrative scholars? Do the professional analyzers and theorizers of narrative have a say in the current storytelling boom? How to engage in a societal dialogue and debate as a narrative scholar?

The conference will provide a platform for scholars to both seek new applications that might appeal to diverse audiences and to critically reflect on the instrumentalization of narrative studies. Most narrative scholars agree on the rich affordances of storytelling: narrative is a compact and intuitive form for sharing detailed, personal experiences as well as collective, community-forming ideas and outlooks. Thus narrative studies approaches lend generous support to the instrumentalization and commercialization of narrative form in business, politics, media, and personal development. Yet narrative may just as well be put to uses that are dubious if not dangerous. The widespread, uncritical use of narratives of personal experience in journalism and social media may have unintended and unanticipated consequences. Experientiality may come at the cost of informativeness. Furthermore, while narratives are ideally suited to conveying the complexity of human experience, the complexity of large social interactions or material processes, such as climate change, easily exceeds the capacity of storytelling. Now that the benefits of storytelling have caught the public imagination and are recognized in various professional practices, narrative scholarship is in a good position to disseminate critical practices for the analysis of the forms and contexts of storytelling as well.

We should also look into future narrative possibilities. The 21st century will no doubt be the era of social media and shared personal narratives, and therefore we should look for productive ways of connecting the personal with the political. How, for example, to bridge the gap between individual particularity and supra-individual concerns at the limits of narrative, such as the climate crisis and global inequality? How to conceptualize and control the afterlife of narratives determined by digital forms of narrative agency? Will new forms of narrative speculation direct our actions as citizens, consumers, and collectives? Which roles will be allotted to specific artistic, digital, and quotidian genres of storytelling? Are these new narrative genres and practices changing the ways people share their experience and use stories in the everyday? Are new affordances for narrative meaning making evolving?


We invite narrative scholars across disciplines to address the following (and related) issues:

  *   storytelling boom and its social relevance
  *   novel ways of storytelling today
  *   emergent methods, ideas, and issues in narrative studies
  *   sociological analysis of curated storytelling
  *   the study of storytelling rights and privileges; re-thinking of empathy
  *   narrative and post-truth
  *   narrative consultancy business; storytelling self-help and manuals
  *   story-critical reading in narrative studies; story-critical tools for audiences
  *   popularizing narrative theory and practices
  *   social life of narratives vs. analysis of individual texts
  *   narrative and action: political narratives, positioning and counter-narratives
  *   professional narratives and narratives of professions refigured
  *   the limits and affordances of narrative in making sense of illness and health
  *   the limits and affordances of narrative in addressing the environmental crisis
  *   uses and risks of viral storytelling and social media sharing
  *   discourse on well-being and cognitive benefits of literature
  *   the potential of fiction in analysing and resisting the narrative boom


The social events include a lake cruise to Viikinsaari island – dinner, sauna & swim!

TRAVEL AND ACCOMMODATION
–  2 hour train ride from the Helsinki airport
–  direct flights to Tampere via 11 hubs
–  strong hotel capacity in the campus area

Conference webpage / CFP and submission link: https://events.tuni.fi/narrativematters2023/call-for-papers/
CFP OPEN UNTIL OCTOBER 31, 2022!
Conference fee EUR 220 (faculty) / EUR 120 (student)

Pre-conference workshops, hosted by Jens Brockmeier, Alexandra Georgakopoulou, Stefan Iversen & Ann Phoenix, will take place on Wednesday, June 14th. More information on registration and participation will be available by the end of September 2022!

Main organizers:
Maria Mäkelä, Matti Hyvärinen & Mari Hatavara (Tampere University, Narrare)
Hanna Meretoja (University of Turku, SELMA)
Merja Polvinen (University of Helsinki)
The Academy of Finland Consortium Project Instrumental Narratives https://instrumentalnarratives.wordpress.com/

Please send your paper and panel proposals by October 31, 2022! Here is the link to the submission form<https://www.lyyti.in/narrativematters2023cfp>

On behalf of the organizing team,

Hanna Meretoja


———————-
Hanna Meretoja
Professor of Comparative Literature, Director of SELMA: Centre for the Study of Storytelling, Experientiality and Memory, University of Turku, Finland
MAE (Member of Academia Europaea)
Tel. +358 50 329 1783
https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-ethics-of-storytelling-9780190649364?lang=en&cc=us


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Deadline for Submissions November 1, 2022

Call for Proposals – Oxford Handbook of Henry David Thoreau

The editors of the proposed Oxford Handbook of Henry David Thoreau seek proposals for essays on any aspect of Thoreau’s works, life, or reception that significantly reframe an aspect of his scholarly, political, or popular legacy. For more than a century, the dominant image of Thoreau was that of a solitary figure who happily turned his back on social ties and political matters to head off into the woods. In both public and scholarly writing, Thoreau was held up as an exemplar of a certain type of white, able-bodied masculinity: one where wilderness was preferable to domestic and social spaces, and where independence and communion with the self in nature superseded other forms of relationality, community, and solidarity. In recent years, scholarly work on Thoreau, including a major biography and several bicentennial volumes, has challenged these long-held critical perceptions with consideration of his work in relation to gender and sexuality, abolition, indigeneity, race, environmental justice, and other issues.

We aim to collect and expand these new directions in Thoreau studies in a comprehensive volume designed to inform the next generation of Thoreau scholarship. We seek contributions from disciplines, traditions, and perspectives that have been previously excluded from or that have been marginalized within Thoreau studies. We are particularly interested in writings that engage with a range of traditions, including anti-racist work and prison abolition; disability justice, LGBTQ+ activism; climate justice; radical politics; as well as experimental or innovative approaches to Thoreau’s life, writings, and legacies.

Please send abstracts of 300 words or fewer to kristen.case@maine.edu and james.finley@tamusa.edu by November 1, 2022. In addition, we welcome queries and would be happy to discuss ideas prior to the deadline.

Contact Info: 

Kristen Case, Professor of English, University of Maine Farmington, kristen.case@maine.edu

James Finley, Associate Professor of English, Texas A&M University – San Antonio, james.finley@tamusa.edu

Contact Email: 

james.finley@tamusa.edu

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Deadline for Submissions November 1, 2022

Call for Papers

Out of the USSR: Travelling Women, Travelling Memories

2–3.2.2023 University of Turku, Finland

Travelling has always been connected with fundamental social and political changes taking place in societies. Throughout history, one of the countries that people have chosen to leave, move away or have been expelled from, but also a country which they have been going back to, is Russia/the Soviet Union. There is an obvious link between the large transformations that have taken place in Russia since the time of perestroika in the 1990s until the ongoing war in Ukraine and the restrictions of civil rights such as freedom of speech, and the increased mobility out of Russia.
 
The conference takes these transformations as starting points in examining how individuals reflect on and recall the Soviet/Russian home country in literary presentations, addressing the history of mobility, emigration, family, gender, ethnic or religious background in face of their collective memory in their new place of residence. The meeting points for the proposals are the concepts of travelling/mobility/exile and (post-, trans-/cross-cultural) memory. The focus is on women’s fictional texts and memories from the 1980s until today that allow the presentations to address and to acknowledge [e]migrating women writers as mediators of ideas and memories in trans-/cross-cultural contexts. The aim of the conference is to focus on gender in the process of the transformation of cultures through ideas that travel, and to pay special attention to women’s contribution to the cultural transfer and mobility of ideas and memories which have not been sufficiently studied and documented. We expect presentations addressing published fictional texts by women who have moved from the Soviet and Russian territories into new areas, and by writing they have created and processed memories of moving and of resettling in a new country/location of residence. We are especially interested in memories of women emigrants and travellers to the Nordic countries, Germany, Great Britain, the US, France and Israel.
 
The organizers plan to publish an edited collection of papers presented at the conference.
 
We invite researchers to a two-day conference that provides a platform to reflect upon the themes that address the following issues and more:

● What is recalled, and how the history of leaving/migration is experienced, recalled and narrated?
● Ideas, ideologies and memories (e.g. national myths) which women carry along to their new country/location of residence, and how they change in regard to the home country vis-à-vis thenew country?
● The creation and production of post-memorial recollection of family history
● Motives for leaving and emigration
● The constitution of matrilinear narratives and transformation of individual, family- and collective memory through travelling
● Carriers, media, contents, practices and forms of travelling memory
● Recollection of Soviet terror (e.g. Stalinist genocide and Holodomor) in the face of the prevalence of Holocaust memory in the new site of residence
● The understanding of one’s “own” culture, its possible changes, and the kind of presentation / narrative forms the change of location / culture /context produces
● Narratives of lived experiences in the new location
● The form that the social and cultural background (age, profession, gender identity, family background, etc.) takes in the texts
● Cultural memories (family, generation, gendered, etc.) that are carried along and created in the new country of residence, and what is their relation to the new location of residence?
● Narration of the journey, departure and arrival at the new location of residence
● Sites of memory in transition

Keynote speakers are:
Eva Hausbacher, Professor of Slavic Literature und Culture at the University of Salzburg, Department of Slavic Studies.
“Close distances: Narratives of the Soviet Past in Russian-German Women’s Writings”

Simona Mitroiu, PhD, Senior Researcher at Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Department of Interdisciplinary Research in Social-Human Sciences
“Generations of Memory in Women’s Narratives: Literary (re)workings of Transnational
Disruptions, Intersections, and Transformations”

Please submit your abstract (title, ca. 250 words, names and affiliations of the presenters) by 1. November 2022 to Viola Parente-Čapková (viocap@utu.fi) and Arja Rosenholm (arja.rosenholm@tuni.fi).

Acceptance letters and the final programme will be sent by the end of November 2022.
 
The conference has its background in the research project Texts on the Move
https://tekstitliikkeessa.com/, examining how Russian women’s texts and ideas have been travelling and moving across the border to Finland in 1840–2020.


Organizer:
Texts on the Move: Reception of Women’s Writing in Finland and Russia 1840–2020 (Emil Aaltonen Foundation), and University of Turku, and Tampere University

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Deadline for Submissions November 1, 2022

Women Writing Women’s Lives Kathy Chamberlain Research Awards

Women Writing Women’s Lives (WWWL), a women’s group dedicated to the writing of women’s lives, is pleased to offer five research awards to women who are furthering the group’s mission. The awards are funded by a generous gift from Edith Penty, a veteran activist in the civil rights and women’s movement, who wished to express her gratitude for the work of WWWL and to honor Kathy Chamberlain. A long-time WWWL member and author of Jane Welsh Carlyle and Her Victorian World, Kathy Chamberlain served as WWWL steering committee chair for ten years.

Each recipient will be awarded five hundred dollars ($500) to help defray expenses incurred while working on a memoir or biography of a woman, in print or other media, such as film, podcast, bibliography, database, or website. Awardees will also receive a one-year membership in WWWL (including dues). Awards must be used between February 1, 2023 and February 1, 2024.

Awards may be used to fund:
● Travel to archives or relevant research locations
● Copying or digitizing materials
● Purchase of books for research
● Computers, software, or other technology needed for the project

Eligibility:
We welcome submissions from women who are current masters and doctoral students; adjunct and/or unaffiliated scholars who received their PhD in the last six years; assistant professors working towards tenure; and independent researchers. WWWL members are not eligible.

How to Apply:
Send an email to ChamberlainAward@gmail.com with the subject line “Chamberlain Award Application.” Attach the application, which consists of one PDF document. The document must include the four items below:
Name the document with your last name, first name [LAST NAME, FIRST NAME].
1. Contact Information: Your name, telephone number, permanent address and e-mail, current employer or academic affiliation, and title of project.
2. Proposal: A 500-word proposal describing the project and how it advances the WWWL mission (see below).
3. Budget: List how the funds will be used.
4. Curriculum Vitae: Provide a 1-page Curriculum Vitae.

Due Date:
Applications will be accepted from September 6 to November 1, 2022 by 11:59 pm. Email the application, which should consist of one PDF attachment to: ChamberlainAward@gmail.com.

Please do not include the application in the body of the email. It must be just one attachment. Award recipients will be notified by February 1, 2023.

Email or call Allysha A. Leonard, Chamberlain Award Administrative Assistant, if you need assistance: ChamberlainAward@gmail.com  (831) 345-9849.

Women Writing Women’s Lives Mission Statement

The places, cultures, and communities in which women live their lives change, as do women’s roles, status, interests, and opportunities. Our purpose as a group is to identify these changes, understand their impact, and explain and portray the complex realities of women’s lives. In biographies and memoirs of women, created in writing or other media, we hope to call attention to the reciprocal dynamics between our subjects and society, to find new ways of looking at and presenting women’s stories, and ultimately to influence the way women’s stories are perceived and written.

https://womenwritingwomenslives.org/kathy-chamberlain-award/

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Deadline for Submissions December 15, 2022

Colonial Letters and the Contact of Knowledges: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Colonial Correspondences

April 11, 2023 to April 14, 2023

University of Bayreuth, Germany

Written correspondence (e.g. letters, diaries, telegrams, etc.) were one of the major means of communication during the 19th – 20th Century British colonialism of Africa. Through them, the instructions, intensions, decisions, complaints, justifications and agenda of resident British colonial officers, local colonial administrators and collaborators, colonial officials in Britain and colonised subjects (individuals, villages) were transmitted across time and space. These letters offer extraordinary access to the mindset and overall agenda of the entities producing them. The ways of life of these entities, their patterns of social order, repertoires and constellations of knowledges, linguistic voices, world views and cosmologies are projected, both directly and indirectly, in these letters. In themselves, these letters embody the contact zone of colonial-precolonial structures, coloniser-colonised entities, indigenous-foreign knowledges, cultural and linguistic practices, etc.

Letters written during British colonialism of Southern Cameroons were the object of study of the research project “Colonial Letters and the Contact of Knowledges” funded by the Africa Multiple Cluster of Excellence at the University of Bayreuth, Germany (https://www.africamultiple.uni-bayreuth.de/en/Projects/Knowledges/Knowledges_Colonial-letters/index.php). The aim of the conference is to present the major findings of the project. We also invite perspectives on British (and other) colonial correspondences in other territories and periods.

Call for papers

We invite submissions that describe, from multidisciplinary perspectives (within the humanities and social sciences, especially linguistics, history, literature, communication studies, anthropology and sociology), the instantiations of colonial contacts, conflicts, contestations and eventual coalescence, co-habitations and or hybridisations of ‘knowledges’ during colonialism that are embodied in, and transmitted through, letters written during British colonisation of Southern Cameroons (1916-1961) and beyond. Other colonisations, especially in Africa, form part of the focus of the conference. Several lines of investigation fall within the scope of the conference including, but not limited to:

  • Colonial correspondences and the construction of multiple identities
  • Colonial correspondences and the discursive enactment of (social, religious, political, hereditary) power
  • Colonial correspondences and the coalescence, cohabitation and hybridisation of colonial and precolonial social norms (interaction, hierarchy, respect forms, kinship affiliation)
  • Colonial correspondences and the contact of languages
  • Colonial correspondences and patterns of language stratification: official, native, local, dialect, etc. languages
  • Colonial correspondences and the production, consolidation and contestation of ‘knowledges’
  • Colonial correspondences and the role of letter writing agencies
  • Colonial correspondences and the concealment of, and access to, knowledge, information and rights
  • Colonial correspondences and colonial social and power structures of stratification
  • etc.

What patterns of knowledge production are adopted in colonial correspondences? How are these different in letters written by colonial administrators and those written by colonised subjects? What repertoires of knowledges drive their production, rejection and perhaps co-construction? To answer these questions, we invite submissions that adopt multidisciplinary, trans-disciplinary or inter-disciplinary approaches.

NB: Selected papers from the conference will be published in the series Africa Multiple: Studies of Africa and its Diasporas (Brill Academic Publishers).

Submission Guidelines 

  • Deadline for receipt of abstracts: 15 December 2022
  • Feedback on abstracts: 31 December 2022
  • Maximum abstract length: 500 words 
  • Submit abstracts to: colonial.letters@uni-bayreuth.de

Partial scholarships

We offer per diems of up to 300€ (i.e., 100€ per day) for participants whose abstracts are accepted.

More info  at: https://colonial-letters.de/#

Contact Info: 

Conference organisers 
Eric A. Anchimbe (University of Bayreuth)

Glory Essien Otung (University of Bayreuth)

Contact Email: 

colonial.letters@uni-bayreuth.de

URL: 

https://www.africamultiple.uni-bayreuth.de/en/Projects/Knowledges/Knowledges_Colonial-letters/Conference-2023/index.html

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READING WOMEN’S LIFE WRITING: A Critical Appraisal

In her book Writing a Woman’s Life (1988), the late Carolyn Heilbrun expressed the need for original scripts for women to live by; stories that press beyond the convention and closure of the marriage plot. Men have always had narrative stories, such as the quest motif and the warrior exemplar, on which to base their lives and within which to tell their life stories. But, Heilbrun argues, such stories of action and accomplishment have been denied to women; the behavior praised by these stories has always been branded “unwomanly”. What we need to do is to move outside that male-centered, binary logic altogether. We need to ask not how Woman is different from Man. We need to know how women have come to be who they are through history, which is the history of their oppression by men and male-designed institutions. Only through an analysis of the power relationships between men and women, and practices based on that analysis, will we put an end to our oppression-and only then will we discover what women are or can be. Only in the last third of the twentieth century have women broken through to a realization of the narratives that have been controlling their lives. Women poets of one generation—those born between 1923 and 1932—can now be seen to have transformed the autobiographies of women’s lives, to have expressed, and suffered for expressing, what women had not earlier been allowed to say.

Please send your papers at drsunitasinha@gmail.com.The deadline is 30th December, 2022. The Wordlimit is between 3500 to 5000 words. The book shall be published by Atlantic Publishers and Distributors New Delhi.

Prof.Sunita Sinha

Email: drsunitasinha@gmail.com

Website: www.sunitasinha.com

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Deadline for Submissions December 31, 2022

University of Warsaw, Poland

5–8 July 2023

Life-Writing in Times of Crisis

IABA Europe 2023


We are pleased to announce that the next IABA Europe Conference will be held in Warsaw, Poland, from July 5th to July 8th 2023. The conference will be held on-site only. The theme of the conference, Life-Writing in Times of Crisis, relates to the challenges we have had to face in Europe and all around the world in recent years. A lot has changed since the 2019 IABA Europe conference in Madrid. The accelerating climate crisis, the COVID–19 pandemic, and then the war in Ukrainehave significantly influenced not only our perception of the world, but also the ways in which we record autobiographical experiences (the practice of writing about one’s own life). A crucial component of the difficult situation in Europe and other parts of the world is the refugee crisis. In recent years, inhabitants of countries affected by wars and terrible conflicts – Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan or African states – have been seeking peace among European communities. Today, millions of Ukrainians are in the same situation.

Contemporary crises may take place on a collective scale and concern events such as war, extermination, the pandemic or economic troubles (rising inflation, unemployment, difficult housing markets), but they can also happen on an individual (personal) scale: illness, the passing of loved ones, imprisonment, forced confinement, hunger, houselessness, unemployment, or changing one’s place ofresidence. Circumstances of unwanted change, sudden rupture, and discontinuity, which could be described as a sense of living in a previously unknown, utterly changed world, often mark the experience of crisis. In all of these situations, different practices of life-writing emerge – and all of them will interest us. How do dynamic sociopolitical processes shape the stories we tell about our everyday lives? What is the relation between the fragmentation or consolidation of entire social systems and the experimental modes of autobiographical narratives putforward by individuals?

Since our conference will be organised in Warsaw, we would like to refer to historical and academic experiences that are specific to Polish and Central European contexts, such as the surprisingly rich tradition of memoir competitions organised in Poland since the 1920s (a total of about 1,500 different competitions were held, with millions of memoirs and diaries collected). Another example would be the tradition of collecting autobiographical documents during the war and the Holocaust, which resulted in the creation of the monumental Ringelblum Archive, among others.

Overall, we aim to examine the relationship between crisis situations and writing one’s life. How and why does autobiographical writing happen during crises, when the established order of the world suddenly collapses and everyday life becomes strange, unpredictable, and threatening? How do we talk about our lives, how and why do we record our experiences in difficult conditions?

We invite proposals focused on archival records or material records in general (diaries, letters, autobiographies, memoirs), as well as various electronic, virtual life-writing practices that may be performed or kept on-line, on various websites or social media platforms. The theme of the conference may also be analysed from the perspective of life-writing in visual forms (photography, drawings, comics, films and video recordings, among others). Finally, participants may discuss records/reports about the experience of crisis created at the request of journalists or researchers, reporters, sociologists, psychologists, and historians (audiovisual, spoken, written accounts, important oral history tradition). All of the above-mentioned ways of “recording” life in a crisis situation are of great interest to us.

During the IABA Warsaw Conference we will celebrate the 10th anniversary of the European Journal of Life Writing.

Submissions:

We welcome 20-minute individual presentations and 90-minute panel sessions (preferably interdisciplinary and international).

The conference will be held in English.

Abstracts should not be longer than 300 words; bios should not be longer than 150 words.

Practicalities and schedule:

Conference website: https://iabawarsaw2023.eu

Conference e-mail: iabawarsaw2023@uw.edu.pl

Online submissions will open on October 15, 2022

Deadline for proposals: December 31, 2022

Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by January 31, 2023

Registration and conference fees: February 1–March 31, 2023

Preliminary programme: May 1, 2023

Detailed programme: June 1, 2023

Conference Fees:

Participants
220 EUR (includes conference lunches and a dinner)

The participation of 5 researchers from Ukraine, free of charge

PhD student participants
170 EUR (includes conference lunches and a dinner)

The participation of 5 PhD students from Ukraine, free of charge

IABA Warsaw 2023 Organising Committee

Teresa Bruś
Marcin Gołąb
Joanna Jeziorska-Haładyj
Artur Hellich
Maciej Libich
Lucyna Marzec
Joanna Piechura
Paweł Rodak
Agnieszka Sobolewska
Honorata Sroka

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Exile at State U: Stories from the Outer Edges of Academe

deadline for submissions: 

December 31, 2022

Douglas Higbee/University of South Carolina, Aiken

contact email: 

douglash@usca.edu

Seeking abstracts for an edited collection of essays about life on the tenure track, especially for those working in the humanities and social sciences at non-R1 colleges and universities.

Because full-time, tenure-track jobs in the humanities and social sciences are hard to come by, we are often told to be grateful and to be quiet. And indeed, there is much to be grateful for and relatively little to shout about. But there are still important stories to be told, and relatively little nonfiction has been written about the subtle but life-changing personal and professional vicissitudes of a career spent in the academic hinterlands of branch state campuses and non-elite private colleges. Especially for those from highly rated grad programs, often in metropolitan locales, a career in a rural area or small town is an eye-opening and life-altering experience.

The goal of the collection is to tell it like it is, warts and all. Essays should be autobiographical, not scholarly, and can be focused on a particular career episode (and thus relatively short) or broader in scope and longer in length. The most important thing is to be compelling, or at least interesting. Humor is more than welcome. Writers are welcome to publish under a pseudonym, or anonymously.

Possible topics or areas of focus

–job application process: interview and campus visit stories; first impressions; deciding whether to take the job

–on the tenure track: the challenges (or lack thereof) of meeting tenure and promotion requirements; interactions with other faculty, administrators, community members; networking and conferences; deciding to stay or leave

–community in exile: relationships with colleagues; relations with neighbors; location details

–after tenure/the middle years: career evolution; putting down roots, professionally and personally; non-academic pursuits; changing jobs

–toward retirement: taking stock; successes and regrets

Please email 1-2 pp. abstracts and a short bio or CV to douglash@usca.edu by Dec. 31, 2022.

Douglas Higbee

University of South Carolina, Aiken

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British Women Writers Conference: Liberties

May 25–28 2023

University of Virginia

deadline for submissions: 

January 15, 2023

contact email: 

bwwc2023@gmail.com

The organizers of the 2023 BWWC invite papers and panel proposals interpreting the theme of ‘Liberties’ in global and transatlantic British women’s writing from the long eighteenth century to the present. We ask participants to consider ‘liberties’ not only as a political abstraction but also as part of material and experiential subjectivity. Interpreted broadly, liberties include (but are not limited to) legal rights and freedoms, liberty of the person and bodily autonomy, liberties of creative and artistic expression, liberty of profession and vocation, freedom of movement both physical and social, and self-determination in the private and public spheres. How far did these liberties extend to women at different historical moments? Were liberties granted by the state and other institutions or taken despite them? How were they imagined and realized differently by women across categories of race, class, ethnicity, nationality, sexuality, age, ability? We invite presenters to contextualize ‘liberties’ in terms of both its capacities and practices as well as its limits and exclusions.

British history of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries poses conflicting and contradictory narratives of liberty. The abolition of the slave trade did not end indentured labor in the colonies. The expansion of the franchise through legislation did not extend the vote to women and the poor. Free trade and market liberalism increased Britain’s wealth but also aggravated socioeconomic inequalities. The rhetorics of emancipation at home contrasted with the realities of imperial rule abroad. How can we make sense of these partial and conditional liberties using literary history? Whose liberty is centered in literary, historical, and political narratives? How is liberty represented in women’s writing — as aspiration, transgression, fantasy, lack? We welcome scholarship that puts the construct of liberty under critical scrutiny and interrogates its relationship to ongoing and incomplete struggles for liberation. We also welcome presentations and panel proposals on pedagogy. How can we draw connections in our teaching between literary history and the liberationist movements of the present? Short talks on pedagogical methodology, classroom practices, use of digital and other media tools, or collective and community-facing projects are highly encouraged.

Possible topics for papers and panels include:

Political liberties

Women and nationhood, women’s civic participation, women and human rights, anti-slavery and abolition, empire and anti-colonialism, suffrage and women’s liberation

Social liberties

Women’s education, women’s work and the professions, women travelers and migration, women’s associations and societies, liberty and domesticity

Liberties of the body

Reproductive liberties, sex and sexuality, desire and consent, queer bodies, women’s physical cultures, women and disability

Liberties of expression

Gender and performance, women’s self-fashioning, women’s art and aesthetics, women and publicity, women and print culture, women’s intellectual histories

Please visit the conference website for more details and to submit your abstracts: http://bwwc23.com/

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Deadline for Submissions July 7, 2023

International Auto/Biography Association Asia-Pacific Conference 2023  

26th-28th Sept 2023 (online conference) 

“Life Narrative in Unprecedented Times: Writing the Unexpected, Narrating the Future”.  

The pandemic has functioned as a reminder of the importance of life storying and testimony as records of experience, as information sharing, or as creative engagement. This conference explores the ways momentous events shape life narration in the past, now, and for the future, for instance, the role of journalism in circulating personal stories, understanding of the impacts of mental health, and a renewed engagement in family and community histories. Each of these themes has been particularly notable during COVID-19. We invite proposals that address life narratives at unprecedented times, but also how life narrative is located by recent histories in diverse contexts and temporality.  

The conference welcomes critical and creative responses including, but not limited to, the themes outlined below:  

*narrating ‘the new normal’ 

*disrupted/stalled futures 

*national/ regional/ local life narratives  

*narrating isolation/ lockdown  

*non-human and post-human lives, particularly connections during COVID/isolation 

*illness narratives  

*stories of grief and loss  

*ageing and storytelling  

*life narrative as record-keeping  

*memorabilia, materials and objects  

*social media / the rise of TikTok  

*children and youth as life narrators  

*Reality television, trends and shifts  

*non-fiction podcasts  

*travel narratives/post-COVID  

*genre shifts (journalism, the essay)  

*narratives of work and employment  

Papers will be 10-15 minutes in length.  

Proposals of 300 words + bios of 50 words should be sent to iaba.asiapacific@flinders.edu.au by 7th July 2023. 

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Kate Douglas (she/her) Professor of English
College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences
+61 402440223
www.flinders.edu.au/people/kate.douglas