Current Postings

The postings below are all still active, and organized by deadline. Once the deadline has passed, they will be moved to the IABA Posting Archive, on the CBR Webpage

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Date for Submissions August 14, 2020

Women in Higher Education: A Compilation of Feminist Historiographies – CALL FOR BOOK CHAPTERS – Book proposal (8/14/2020)

We are pleased to invite chapters for an upcoming book proposal entitled, Women in Higher Education: A Compilation of Feminist Historiographies. The focus of the book will be on women who have significantly influenced higher education in the United States during the mid-19th to mid-20th centuries.

Nineteenth century women academics faced numerous tensions in their pursuit of higher education. Their persistence was scoffed at by contemporaries. Women of this time period influenced gender equity, however their contributions to the field of higher education have remained largely unrecognized. Their journeys and leadership strategies may be relevant to women seeking and securing educational roles.

The absence of women leaders in higher education has been noted by various scholars. An analysis of their leadership skills is needed within the current academic landscape. As female graduate students continue to enter into the field of higher education in increasing numbers, there is an urgency to revisit the experiences and contributions of female academics to avoid continuation of the grand narrative. Their lived experiences and educational contributions provide foundations and principles which can influence future women leaders in higher education. By bringing these women to the forefront, there is a possibility of diversifying and advancing the field of leadership in higher education.

Examining women’s contributions to the field of higher education is ethical and responsible and works toward affirming how past female leaders and the strategies they employed can inform current practices of leaders in higher education.

We recognize that there remain countless untold stories of their work that have remained unnoticed or disregarded. We welcome feminist historiographies highlighting

women from a wide range of national, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds to share the legacies of these female educational pioneers. If accepted, the final book chapters must document the subject’s relevant biography, her contribution to higher education and demonstrate an in-depth intersectionality of narratives between author and historical female figure.

This work is being advanced by doctoral students in a class on Women in Higher Education at the University of Hartford. We particularly invite graduate students to participate in this project. We have written feminist historiographies on five women who had a positive impact on the field of higher education prior to the 1950s. The five women are: Annie Howes Barus, Harriette J. Cooke, Alice Hamilton, Frances Willard and Sara Josephine Baker.

Submission Details:

Please send a two-page PDF summary of your proposed book chapter of a feminist historiography that includes the details outlined above. Please also denote a chapter title and include the affiliation(s) and degree(s) of the author(s).

After notification of acceptance of summaries, final book chapter submissions should be approximately 10 pages (double-spaced). Final book chapters must adhere to the guidelines within the 7th edition of the APA Publication Manual.

The timeline is as follows:

Submission deadline for summaries: August 14, 2020

Notification of acceptance of summaries: September 30, 2020

Submission deadline for full book chapters: January 8, 2020

Final submission of revised book chapters: March 1, 2021

Proposed Publication Date: Fall 2022

Proposals and submissions should be emailed to the Main Editor: Karen Case at kcase@hartford.edu

Contact Info:

Karen Case, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Administration and Supervision

University of Hartford, Department of Education

200 Bloomfield Avenue, Auerbach 223C

West Hartford, CT 06117

Phone: (860) 508-4397

Email: kcase@hartford.edu

Contact Email:

kcase@hartford.edu

Contact Info:

Karen Case, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Administration and Supervision

University of Hartford, Department of Education

200 Bloomfield Avenue, Auerbach 223C

West Hartford, CT 06117

Phone: (860) 508-4397

Contact Email:

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CFP Autobiography Before Autobiography (1400-1700) (8/15/2020; 11/13-14/2020) Berlin, Germany

International Online Workshop at the Freie Universität, Berlin

Oranizer: Nicolae Virastau, PhD (Columbia University), Postdoctoral Fellow of the Dahlem Humanities Center, Freie Universität, Berlin

13 November and 14 November 2020

Jacob Burckhardt famously placed the birth of autobiography during the Renaissance in the context of the discovery of the individual, and the awakening of the self. Few scholars today would fully embrace this master narrative. Medievalists posit the existence of a sense of individual selfhood much earlier, in the High Middle Ages, while many literary theorists of autobiography employ a narrow definition of autobiography focusing on personal development and reflexive subjectivity. Thus, literary theory effectively excludes from the history of autobiography most of what was written before the eighteenth century. Conversely, more recent cultural historians and historians of private life have sought to recover neglected forms of self-writing that do not fit modern definitions of the literary genre of autobiography: account books, semiliterate diaries, or astrological almanacs. They proposed neologisms such as life-writing, egodocuments, and self-testimonies to avoid the teleological implications of the Burckhardtian grand narrative, and to include texts that have been neglected by the traditional literary history of autobiography.

The goal of this workshop is to bring together historians and literary scholars working on a wide range of late-medieval and early-modern self-writing forms that challenge the more common, postromantic ideas about autobiography, such as: family books, books of reason, almanacs, artisan autobiographies, but also prefaces and marginalia. Papers that can address the relation of these types of self-writing to the better-known genres of the vitae, commentarii, memoirs, confessions, essays, poetic autobiographies, etc. are especially welcome.

Papers should be given in English or French, and should not exceed 30 minutes. Please send an abstract (300 words max.) and a brief CV (2 pages max.) at NAV2110@COLUMBIA.EDU.

Due to the Covid-19 outbreak, the conference will take place online. The submission deadline has been extended to August 15, 2020.

Contact Info:

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Deadline for Submissions August 15, 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS

Heroines of the Holocaust: Frameworks of Resistance

Wagner College Holocaust Center

June 2-3, 2021

“Nobody taught us how to fight or to perform our duties. We learned by ourselves not only how to clean and use a gun, but how to conduct ourselves in combat and battle, how to blow up a bridge or a train, how to cut communication lines and how to stand on guard.”

—Sara Ginaite, partisan, March 8, 1944 (International Woman’s Day)

The activities of women during the Holocaust have often been forgotten, erased, misunderstood, or intentionally distorted. Jewish women and those of all faiths fought with dignity, compassion and courage to save others from the murderous Nazi regime in over 30 nations. Often overlooked, women as well as men played critical roles in uprisings against the Nazis in over 50 ghettos, 18 forced labor camps and 5 concentration camps, including Auschwitz. Women were critical to the Jewish underground and other resistance networks both as armed fighters and as strategists and couriers of intelligence and false papers. Women played essential roles operating educational, cultural and humanitarian initiatives. In other genocides, women also faced horrendous atrocities, yet distinguished themselves with resilience and acts of moral courage. This symposium hopes to create a new narrative around agency in the Shoah and other genocides, which may inspire transformative activism today.

From the groundbreaking 1983 conference on “Women and the Holocaust” at Stern College to the 2018 symposium on “Women, the Holocaust and Genocide” at Seton Hill University, research on gender issues has grown exponentially. Innumerable books, conferences, panels, films, journal special issues, and groups such as Remember the Women Institute, now document the inspiring lives of female participants. Yet, there remain many untold stories of women fighting back against the Nazis with pistol or pen. The leadership strategies, networks of defiance and testimony of better-known activists, such as Vitka Kempner-Kovner, Zivia Lubetkin, Vladka Meed, Sara Fortis, Gisi Fleishman, Marie-Madeleine Fourcade, Nadezhda Popova, Haviva Reik, Edith Bruck, Friedl Dicker-Brandeis and Roza Robota, among others, still merit far more attention; their lives, too, should become part of the canon of Holocaust study. How is our understanding of the Shoah– and the central question of how it happened– impacted and re-conceptualized by knowing about the activities of female resisters and rescuers?  This symposium will bring together international scholars working on this topic to share new approaches, projects and information on well-known women, as well as those whose stories remain shrouded in obscurity.

We seek papers exploring women as rescuers and resisters of the Holocaust and genocide. Topics include, but are not limited to:

Leadership Lessons of Women in Resistance Networks

Women and Resistance in the Concentration Camps

Women Rescuers and Resisters in the Ghettos

Female Partisans in World War II

The Psychology of Rescue and Resistance

Women Doctors, Nurses and Social Workers

Female Artists as Resisters

The Power of a Photo of Women Resisters

The Role of Women in Zionist and other youth groups

Women as Resisters and Rescuers in Genocide

Resilient Bonds: Mother/Sister/Aunt/Daughter/Grandmother

Beyond Anne Frank: Women’s Journals, Memoirs and Archives

Films and Music of Women and Human Rights

Limits and Possibilities of Collection of Women’s Oral Testimony and Archives

Post-Holocaust Life of Female Resisters and Rescuers

Historiography of Jewish and non-Jewish Resisters and Rescuers

Illiberal Memory Politics and Selective Forgetting of Women

Teaching about Women, Resistance and Rescue

Please submit abstracts of 300 to 500 words outlining the focus and approach of your paper. Abstracts must include full name and title, institutional affiliation and email address. Please also attach a copy of your CV.

Subject line should be: LAST NAME Abstract Heroines

Submit to both Conference Organizers:

Laura Morowitz, Professor of Art History, Wagner College lmorowit@wagner.edu

And Lori Weintrob, Professor of History and Director, Wagner College Holocaust Center holocaust.center@wagner.edu.

Important Dates:

August 15, 2020: Deadline for submission of Abstracts

October 1, 2020: Notification of Acceptance

The two-day symposium on the campus of Wagner College, in Staten Island, New York, is sponsored by the Wagner College Holocaust Center. The Museum of Jewish Heritage in Manhattan will host a private visit for participants. Details on accommodations and travel will be sent following acceptance of paper. We will open up the conference on the second day to NY/NJ teachers and a general audience ensuring an even greater circulation of these ideas.

Contact Info:

Professor Laura Morowitz, Wagner College

Professor Lori Weintrob, Wagner College

Contact Email:

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Deadline for Submissions August 15, 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS

Heroines of the Holocaust: Frameworks of Resistance

Wagner College Holocaust Center

June 2-3, 2021

Deadline for Submissions, August 15, 2020
“Nobody taught us how to fight or to perform our duties. We learned by ourselves not only how to clean and use a gun, but how to conduct ourselves in combat and battle, how to blow up a bridge or a train, how to cut communication lines and how to stand on guard.”

—Sara Ginaite, partisan, March 8, 1944 (International Woman’s Day)

The activities of women during the Holocaust have often been forgotten, erased, misunderstood, or intentionally distorted. Jewish women and those of all faiths fought with dignity, compassion and courage to save others from the murderous Nazi regime in over 30 nations. Often overlooked, women as well as men played critical roles in uprisings against the Nazis in over 50 ghettos, 18 forced labor camps and 5 concentration camps, including Auschwitz. Women were critical to the Jewish underground and other resistance networks both as armed fighters and as strategists and couriers of intelligence and false papers. Women played essential roles operating educational, cultural and humanitarian initiatives. In other genocides, women also faced horrendous atrocities, yet distinguished themselves with resilience and acts of moral courage. This symposium hopes to create a new narrative around agency in the Shoah and other genocides, which may inspire transformative activism today.

From the groundbreaking 1983 conference on “Women and the Holocaust” at Stern College to the 2018 symposium on “Women, the Holocaust and Genocide” at Seton Hill University, research on gender issues has grown exponentially. Innumerable books, conferences, panels, films, journal special issues, and groups such as Remember the Women Institute, now document the inspiring lives of female participants. Yet, there remain many untold stories of women fighting back against the Nazis with pistol or pen. The leadership strategies, networks of defiance and testimony of better-known activists, such as Vitka Kempner-Kovner, Zivia Lubetkin, Vladka Meed, Sara Fortis, Gisi Fleishman, Marie-Madeleine Fourcade, Nadezhda Popova, Haviva Reik, Edith Bruck, Friedl Dicker-Brandeis and Roza Robota, among others, still merit far more attention; their lives, too, should become part of the canon of Holocaust study. How is our understanding of the Shoah– and the central question of how it happened– impacted and re-conceptualized by knowing about the activities of female resisters and rescuers?  This symposium will bring together international scholars working on this topic to share new approaches, projects and information on well-known women, as well as those whose stories remain shrouded in obscurity.

We seek papers exploring women as rescuers and resisters of the Holocaust and genocide. Topics include, but are not limited to:

Leadership Lessons of Women in Resistance Networks

Women and Resistance in the Concentration Camps

Women Rescuers and Resisters in the Ghettos

Female Partisans in World War II

The Psychology of Rescue and Resistance

Women Doctors, Nurses and Social Workers

Female Artists as Resisters

The Power of a Photo of Women Resisters

The Role of Women in Zionist and other youth groups

Women as Resisters and Rescuers in Genocide

Resilient Bonds: Mother/Sister/Aunt/Daughter/Grandmother

Beyond Anne Frank: Women’s Journals, Memoirs and Archives

Films and Music of Women and Human Rights

Limits and Possibilities of Collection of Women’s Oral Testimony and Archives

Post-Holocaust Life of Female Resisters and Rescuers

Historiography of Jewish and non-Jewish Resisters and Rescuers

Illiberal Memory Politics and Selective Forgetting of Women

Teaching about Women, Resistance and Rescue

Please submit abstracts of 300 to 500 words outlining the focus and approach of your paper. Abstracts must include full name and title, institutional affiliation and email address. Please also attach a copy of your CV.

Subject line should be: LAST NAME Abstract Heroines

Submit to both Conference Organizers:

Laura Morowitz, Professor of Art History, Wagner College lmorowit@wagner.edu

And Lori Weintrob, Professor of History and Director, Wagner College Holocaust Center holocaust.center@wagner.edu.

Important Dates:

August 15, 2020: Deadline for submission of Abstracts

October 1, 2020: Notification of Acceptance

The two-day symposium on the campus of Wagner College, in Staten Island, New York, is sponsored by the Wagner College Holocaust Center. The Museum of Jewish Heritage in Manhattan will host a private visit for participants. Details on accommodations and travel will be sent following acceptance of paper. We will open up the conference on the second day to NY/NJ teachers and a general audience ensuring an even greater circulation of these ideas.

Contact Info:

Professor Laura Morowitz, Wagner College

Professor Lori Weintrob, Wagner College

Contact Email:

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Deadline for Submissions August 15, 2020

CFP for Special Issue about African American Biofiction

for the journal African American Review

                Biofiction is literature that names its protagonist after an actual historical figure, and it has become a dominant aesthetic form since the late 1980s, resulting in stellar works from global luminaries as varied like Gabriel García Márquez, J.M. Coetzee, Margaret Atwood, Michael Cunningham, Joyce Carol Oates, Mario Vargas Llosa, Peter Carey, Olga Tokarczuk, and Hilary Mantel, just to mention a notable few. Studies about biofiction have surged over the last ten years, but what scholars have not yet noted is the African American contribution to the evolution, rise, and legitimization of biofiction.

There were some important biofictions published in the nineteenth century, such as Herman Melville’s Israel Potter: His Fifty Years of Exile (1855), Gustave Flaubert’s The Temptation of St. Anthony (1874) and “Herodias” (1877), Friedrich Nietzsche’s Thus Spoke Zarathustra (1883-85), and Oscar Wilde’s “The Portrait of Mr. W.H.” (1889). But the first real boom occurred in the 1930s, with influential publications from authors like Thomas Mann, Heinrich Mann, Irving Stone, and Robert Graves. Worth noting is that Arna Bontemps (Black Thunder) and Zora Neale Hurston (Moses, Man of the Mountain) published two of the more impressive biofictions from the decade.

But it would be two novels about African Americans in the second half of the twentieth century that would contribute significantly to the most important boom in biofiction, which is still underway. In 1967, William Styron published the hugely controversial novel The Confessions of Nat Turner, which won the Pulitzer Prize in Fiction, while in 1979, Barbara Chase-Riboud published Sally Hemings, a work that sold more than a million copies and led, in part, Eugene A. Foster to carry out DNA testing, which confirmed that Hemings’s descendants are related to Jefferson.

African Americans, either as authors or protagonists, are of crucial importance in some of the most impactful biofictions, including Chase-Riboud’s The President’s Daughter (Jefferson’s daughter Harriet Hemings) and Hottentot Venus (Sarah Baartman), Charles Johnson’s Dreamer (Martin Luther King, Jr.), Louis Edwards’s Oscar Wilde Discovers America, Caryl Phillips’s Dancing in the Dark (Bert Williams), Chika Unigwe’s De Zwarte Messias (Olaudah Equiano), and Colum McCann’s TransAtlantic (Frederick Douglass), just to name a few. It is for this reason that the African American Review is soliciting essays for a special issue about African American biofiction, by which is meant either biofiction by or about African Americans.

We welcome essays about the history of the aesthetic form in relation to African American literature and culture, African American innovations within the form, the role of African Americans within biofiction, studies about individual texts, and the recovery of lost historical figures through biofiction. More speculative essays are also welcome. For instance, we know that Toni Morrison encouraged Chase-Riboud to write Sally Hemings. Given the huge success of that 1979 novel, why did Morrison change the name of her protagonist in Beloved? How would Beloved signify differently had Morrison written it as a biographical novel? How would Sally Hemings function and signify differently had Chase-Riboud changed the protagonist’s name? Such contrastive and comparative studies could illuminate individual novels as well as African American biofiction more generally.

Essays will be due on August 15th, 2021.

For information about this special issue, contact Michael Lackey (lacke010@morris.umn.edu)

Michael Lackey

Distinguished McKnight University Professor

University of Minnesota, Morris

104 Humanities Building

600 East 4th Street

Morris, MN 56267-2132
320-589-6263

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Deadline for Submissions, August  30, 2020

Prose Studies is Seeking an Editor

About the Role

Prose Studies provides a forum for discussion of the history, theory and criticism of non-fictional prose of all periods. As the study of non-fiction prose transforms, Routledge are seeking to appoint a new Editor, or pair of Co-Editors, with suitable academic background as well as the passion to drive the journal forward. The journal and Routledge are dedicated to diversity, inclusion and fair process, and we therefore welcome scholars from all backgrounds and creeds to apply.

The successful candidate(s) will be responsible for editorial oversight and decision-making on submissions, using the Prose Studies Editorial Manager site. They will have authority to accept articles following peer review and will ensure that reviewers, authors and Editorial Board members adhere to the journal’s Code of Publishing Ethics. The new Editor(s) would initially work with the current Editor, Clare Simmons (Ohio State University) through an agreed handover period to ensure seamless transition. The new Editor(s) would be free to choose a team to support them and update the journal’s policies as relevant.

Routledge will provide training on systems and processes used as well as remuneration for the role to cover any journal-related expenses. Routledge will also be able to supply annual reports reflecting on the performance of the journal to support ongoing development.

Becoming the Editor of a journal is a rewarding and fulfilling experience where you will build your own networks, promote the research that you are passionate about, and be recognised as a leading figure within the research community.

Submitting your Application

Interested in applying? Here are the skills and attributes we would be looking for in a successful applicant:

  • Active within a relevant research community (including but not limited to literature, languages, rhetoric, media studies, communication and journalism);
  • Experience of/in academic publishing (special issues, peer review, edited collections, etc.);
  • Confidence to engage with authors and researchers to attract the highest quality submissions;
  • Strong organisational skills to ensure that submissions are handled in a timely manner;
  • Excellent communication skills and the ability to foster positive working relationships with colleagues such as reviewers, Editorial Board members, authors and Routledge contacts;
  • Time to devote to the journal’s development and act as an ambassador for the journal.

Submitting your Expression of Interest

If you are interested in the role, please send your CV(s) and a short vision statement to Becky Guest, Routledge, (rebecca.guest@tandf.co.uk) by 31st August 2020. Potential co-editors should express their interest jointly.

Your vision statement should be no longer than 600 words and should cover:

  • Where you believe the study of non-fiction prose is going, and the journal’s place within it;
  • What opportunities for development you see, and ideas for how you would enact these;
  • How you would maintain and increase the quality and diversity of submissions in a virtual environment.

Following receipt, suitable candidates will be selected to discuss the role in more detail.

Formal appointment and a transition timeline will then be mutually agreed with Routledge and the outgoing Editor.

If you have any questions about the role or application process, please contact the current Editor simmons.9@osu.edu and rebecca.guest@tandf.co.uk.

For more information

https://think.taylorandfrancis.com/fprs-callforeditor/

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Deadline for Submissions, September 15, 2020

Beyond Biofiction: Writers and Writing in Neo-Victorian Fiction

Guest Editors: Armelle Parey and Charlotte Wadoux

2021/22 Special Issue of Neo-Victorian Studies (http://neovictorianstudies.com)

Despite the death of the author famously announced by Roland Barthes in 1967, real-life writers as characters, sometimes intermingling with their own creations, feature prominently in neo-Victorian fiction and other media. Besides reprising historical writers’ careers and exposing their secret, sometimes disreputable lives, these neo-Victorian biofictions also engage, self-consciously or implicitly, with changes in writing modes, genres, and narrative conventions over time and with the theorisation of both creative practice and life-writing. The same holds true of depictions of wholly imaginary, professional or aspiring literary scribes without specific historical antecedents. Simultaneously, neo-Victorian portrayals of writers highlight dubious inequalities between celebrity and marginalised literary figures, implicated in perpetuating biased canons as well as selective forms of cultural commemoration, often privileging the same, predominantly white male writers (Charles Dickens, Henry James, Alfred Lord Tennyson) as the most suitable subjects for rewrites, with even the Brontë sisters suffering from tokenism in comparison and writers of other races going almost entirely unrepresented. This special issue aims to explore neo-Victorian representations of writers and writing in biofiction and beyond from new and innovative angles. We are particularly interested in contributions that pursue the following enquiries: Which actual nineteenth-century writers and their works are reimagined, which are not, and what accounts for such policies of differential remembrance and forgetting? How are writers deliberately misrepresented, and what present-day agendas does such misremembering serve? What accounts for the persistent fascination with the writer figure, real or imagined, in an increasingly digital age, where the book almost seems destined to relegation to the museum and the realm of virtual objects? How do neo-Victorian concerns with writing engage metafictionally with neo-Victorianism’s own processes of writing – and reading – the Victorians today? What new approaches to and techniques of intertextuality can be discerned in neo-Victorian depictions of authorship? Possible topics may include, but need not be limited to, the following:

  • rethinking and reworking the ‘cultural capital’ of nineteenth-century writers
  • innovations in neo-Victorian biofictions of writers: new orientations
  • the differential canonisation and depreciation of author figures (in terms of race, ethnicity, class, (trans)gender, sexual orientation, able-bodiedness, etc.)
  • neo-Victorian metafictional engagements with processes of writerly production, reception, and consumption
  • immersive neo-Victorian encounters with author figures: writing, empathy and affect
  • engagements with theory and its contestation in neo-Victorian writer fictions

We especially invite contributions on neo-Victorian fictions and biofictions featuring Victorian writers that have not yet attracted significant critical attention, as well as on texts featuring period scenes of non-Western writers and writing.

Please address enquiries and expressions of interest to the guest editors Armelle Parey (armelle.parey@unicaen.fr) and Charlotte Wadoux (cwadoux@gmail.com). Abstracts/proposals of 250-300 words, with accompanying brief bio note, will be due by 15 September 2020. Completed articles will be due by 1 March 2021. Abstracts and articles in Word document format should be sent via email to both guest editors, with a copy to neovictorianstudies@swansea.ac.uk. Please consult the NVS website (‘Submission Guidelines’) for further guidance.

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Deadline for Submissions, September 15, 2020

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

ILLNESS, NARRATED

ON_CULTURE: THE OPEN JOURNAL FOR THE STUDY OF CULTURE

ISSUE 11 (SUMMER 2021)

In response to debates considering the relationship between illness and narrative, and the extent to which these concepts can be seen as mutually constitutive, this issue of On_Culture seeks to gather new approaches and critical perspectives to the intricate relationship between narrative and illness. We welcome (inter)disciplinary contributions addressing the concepts’ entanglement on an individual, societal, and global level.

Already in 1963, Michel Foucault linked (illness) narration to its discursive conditions in The Birth of the Clinic. Moving away from the politicized view on what narrative does, medical humanities today stresses the importance, and even healing aspect of telling an illness story. In this positive view on the redeeming aspects of illness narration, identity and narrative are understood as inextricably linked. Rita Charon asserts that narrative is a central instance of good medical practice, since “without narrative acts, the patient cannot himself or herself grasp what the events of illness mean” (Charon 2006, Narrative Medicine, 13). In this broad formulation, ‘narrative’ uncritically refers to the act of self-expression as such, without taking into account the conditions that set the parameters for it.

The scope of narrative has been a central concern of critical approaches to the medical humanities. Scholars like Angela Woods, in taking up Galen Strawson (2004, “Against Narrativity”), criticize the emphasis on narrative in the medical humanities, stating that “it has never been innocent” (Woods 2011, “The Limits of Narrative”, 75). Woods warns against understanding “a person’s narrative or story […] to be coextensive with their subjective experience, their psychological health and indeed their very humanity” (73). According to Brian Schiff, the focus on narrative reifies a Western, “arguably middle and upper class concept as a universal mode of shaping and articulating experience” (Schiff 2006, “The Promise”, 21). Moreover, historians of colonial and global history showed how those narratives were challenged and contradicted, leading to other conceptions of medical knowledge (e.g. Arnold 1993, Colonizing the Body). Other approaches broaden the concept of narrative, show how stories of illness might “reject the comforts of narrative” (McKechnie 2014, “Anxieties of Communication”, 121), yet still demand to be met with narrative engagement.

Beyond the immediate focus on narrative as illness mediation, the turn to affect in critical theory can prove productive in addressing the autonomy of the body. For the (critical) medical humanities, this opens up space with which to think of the bodily experience beyond narrative and to ask if this is even possible. Furthermore, expanding the scope of narrative beyond literary texts, internet culture, online media, and the increasing use of digital and technological innovations in healthcare can be seen to mediate both health and illness in different ways.

In response to these ongoing debates, we welcome innovative and interdisciplinary approaches in the (critical) medical humanities, narrative medicine, history of medicine, disability studies, narratology, literary studies, historiography, empirical social science, media, television and film studies, and other related disciplines that address how narrative is interlinked with illness experience and medical practice.

We welcome submissions including, but not restricted to, the following topics:

  • Illness/Narrative and self-expression
  • Narrative as mediation of bodily experience
  • Differences in discussing physical and mental illness
  • Narrating about vs. narrating with illness
  • Disease classification/taxonomy/nosology
  • Illness as metaphor
  • Subversive illness narration (e.g. chaos narratives)
  • Illness narratives in gender, queer and trans studies
  • Non-Western conceptualizations and narratives of illness
  • Illness narratives in different media (literature, newspapers, magazines, advertising, television (series), film, games, etc.)
  • Online support groups, blogging, confession stories, memes, fora (e.g. Spoonies and Spoon Theory)
  • Interfaces of the digital and medical realm (algorithms, digital data, and self-tracking apps)

If you are interest in having a peer reviewed academic article featured in this issue of On_Culture, please submit an abstract of 300 words with the article title, 5-6 keywords, and a short biographical note to content@on-culture.org (subject line “Abstract Submission Issue 11”) no later than September 15, 2020. You will be notified by September 30, 2020 whether your paper proposal has been accepted. The final date for full papaper submissions is January 15, 2021.

Please note: On_Culture also features a section devoted to shorter, creative pieces pertaining to each issue topic. These can be interviews, essays, opinion pieces, reviews of exhibitions, analyses of cultural artifacts and events, photo galleries, videos, works of art … and more! These contributions are uploaded on a rolling basis, also to previous issues. Interested in contributing? Send your idea to content@on-culture.org

View CfA online https://www.on-culture.org/submission/cfa-issue-11/

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Deadline for Submissions, September 15, 2020

CFP for Comparative Cinema: Biopic vs biopic: Cinematographic life as a place for comparison

deadline for submissions:
September 15, 2020
full name / name of organization:
Universitat Pompeu Fabra
contact email:

Over the last ten years, the biopic has been carried out by many relevant filmmakers —within and beyond the mainstream— and it has become a key genre in contemporary cinema. This fact is attested by titles like ‘Carlos’ (Olivier Assayas, 2010), ‘J. Edgar’ (Clint Eastwood, 2011), ‘Hannah Arendt’ (Margarethe von Trotta, 2012), ‘Camille Claudel 1915’ (Bruno Dumont, 2013), ‘Saint Laurent’ (Bertrand Bonello, 2014), ‘Steve Jobs’ (Danny Boyle, 2015), ‘Neruda’ (Pablo Larraín, 2016), ‘Snowden’ (Oliver Stone, 2016), ‘First Man’ (Damien Chazelle, 2018), ‘Loro: International Cut’ (Paolo Sorrentino, 2018), ‘At Eternity’s Gate’ (Julian Schnabel, 2018), ‘Bohemian Rapsody’ (Brian Synger, 2018), ‘The Traitor’ (Marco Bellocchio, 2019), ‘Judy’ (Rupert Goold, 2019), ‘Rocketman’ (Dexter Fletcher, 2019) and ‘A Hidden Life’ (Terrence Malick, 2019). At the same time, documentary biopics have increased, as in the case of ‘George Harrison: Living in the Material World’ (Martin Scorsese, 2011), ‘The Salt of the Earth’ (Wim Wenders and Juliano Ribeiro Salgado, 2014), ‘Amy’ (Asif Kapadia, 2015), ‘Diego Maradona’ (Asif Kapadia, 2019) and ‘Pavarotti’ (Ron Howard, 2019).

The diversity among these titles is proof of Belén Vidal’s statement in the prologue to the volume ‘The Biopic in Contemporary Film Culture’ (Belén Vidal and Tom Brown, eds., 2014): the term biopic —usually undervalued as a synonym of narrative restrictions and aesthetic conservatism— is also used to name a space that is open to formal experiments. That is the reason why, in the past decade, this genre has also received renewed attention in the academic world, with volumes like ‘Whose Lives Are They Anyway? The Biopic as Contemporary Film Genre’ (Dennis Bingham, 2010), ‘Biopic: de la réalité à la fiction’ (Rémi Fontanel, ed., 2011) and ‘Invented Lives, Invented Communities: The Biopic and American National Identity’ (William H. Epstein and R. Barton Palmer, eds., 2016).

In this issue of ‘Comparative Cinema’, we want to approach the biopic from the specific perspective of comparative cinema. How much does the story of a lifetime allow to compare aesthetic and narrative differences between two separate works? Which biopic elements are especially relevant for a comparison? Rather than discovering what the comparison between two biopics reveals us, we are interested in how such comparison can be articulated and in finding out which of its elements can be the most fruitful. Some lines of work are suggested:

Biopic and life: biopics privilege certain moments of a trajectory. Which of the life chapters are the most revealing of narrative and aesthetic differences? Between the personal and the professional life, which one of them has a greater impact on the comparison between different biopics?

Biopic and film time: by its very definition, the biopic is developed throughout a long, well delimited period. How can the length of the portrayed period, the length of the film and the time dedicated to each event be compared between different works?

Biopic and star studies: biopics entail professional challenges for performers because they can strengthen or renew their star persona. How can a biopic be compared to other performances by the same actor? How can the real character and the previous roles of the performer be compared through specific gestures?

Biopic and authorship: some filmmakers have transformed the biopic into a sign of identity. Is it possible to find common elements between different biopics directed by the same author? How much do the author’s other films —not biopics— influence these biopics?

Biopic and documentary film: many characters have been biographed both in documentaries and fiction films. Moreover, the fiction biopic can sometimes include real images. How can comparison between a documentary biopic and a fiction biopic be articulated? How much does the biopic allow to approach methodologies about documentary film?

Priority shall be given to papers focused on cinema from the 2000-2020 period (or papers containing, at least, one film from this period in their comparison). Papers must be between 5000 and 6000 words long, including footnotes. The texts (in a Word format) and the images accompanying them must be sent through the RACO platform, available on the website of the journal.

This special issue is also open for publishing interviews that have been previously agreed with the editors. Suggestions can be sent to comparativecinema@upf.edu.

The time limit for receiving papers is the 15th of September 2020.

https://www.raco.cat/index.php/Comparativecinema/announcement/view/79

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Deadline for Submissions, September 30, 2020

Addressing ‘The Memoir Problem’ (Creative Panel)

NeMLA 2021  March 11-14, Buffalo N.Y.
contact email:

Addressing ‘The Memoir Problem’: Blocked Memories, Documentary Traces, and Hybrid Forms (Creative Panel)

As memoir continues to be a wildly popular genre in our world today, there are many challenges to writing memory and many stakes to publishing a memoir. In many ways, writing a memoir may be a kind of mythical beast for emerging voices. How does one finish a memoir and what marks its timeliness and closure? This forum seeks to interrogate the expectation of a memoir to follow a traditional narrative arc, to expand genre definitions and to highlight cross-genre work. If memory is object-oriented, why do we expect memoir to be plot-driven? How may object or image centric work take a different approach to scene and narrative-telling? Contemporary innovations in creative nonfiction craft, comics, short forms and documentary poetics may reveal how cross-genre work offers a fruitful place to challenge readers’ expectations and incorporate other disciplines in writing. Many established and emerging voices, leading this work and creating new platforms for writers, are reclaiming their stories through traumas and against injustices and discriminations. As a space for writers to read their work and share in Q&A, a diversity of voices & styles are sought. Submissions of auto-fiction & auto-theory, somehow “memoir-esque,” are also encouraged.

Creative genres may include but are not limited to:

  • Memoir, Memoir-esque, Memoir Plus
  • Creative Nonfiction, Including Creative Nonfiction Comics & Diary Comics
  • Autobiography & Life-Writing
  • Poetry & Experimental/Hybrid Forms
  • Personal Essay
  • Auto-Theory
  • Auto-Fiction

Please submit an abstract of 200 to 250 words describing your proposed creative reading by September 30th, 2020, to the submission page: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/18874

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Deadline for Submissions, September 30, 2020

The Writer as Sociopath (9/30/2020; 3/11-4/2021) NEMLA, Philadelphia, USA

full name / name of organization:
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
contact email:

This panel will consider the cases of writers who have used their platforms to create fictions of self—to misrepresent, self-justify, even blatantly lie about their own lives and realities. The panel is open to considering any act of writing sociopathy, from memoir (e.g., M.E. Thomas’s 2013 Confessions of a Sociopath or Donald Trump’s The Art of the Deal) to fictional works that inhabit the minds of sociopaths (e.g., A Clockwork Orange, Gone Girl) to literary fakers (e.g., James Frey, Danny Santiago, JT LeRoy, Caroline Calloway). Is writing in itself an act of misrepresentation bordering on psychopathy? This panel is asked to investigate such issues as literary hoaxes, memoir and identity, and question of whether writing is inherently a form of the “long con.”

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Deadline for Submissions, September 30, 2020

Call for Chapters: The Lived Religious Lives of Women in 21st Century Britain. (9/30/2020)

 

Little is written about the lived religious lives of women in 21st century Britain. I am describing the term, lived religion, as the ways in which people practice religion in their everyday lives. This may or may not include worship in a religious setting and can be formal or informal.

Vernon Press invites chapter proposals that look at this topic across religions and religious denominations. This may include subjects such as:

  • Food
  • Clothing
  • Prayer
  • Female Ordination
  • Navigating the patriarchy in conservative religious denominations
  • Ritual
  • Women only religious spaces
  • Solidarity and support through religion
  • Family worship and religious observation

Please submit an abstract no longer than 500 words. The proposal should also include a short biographical note. Complete chapter lengths should be between 6000-8000 words.

All submissions to Yvonne Bennett at yhb64a@gmail.com by September 30th, 2020

Contact Info:

Yvonne Bennett: yhb64a@gmail.com

William Whitehead: william.whitehead@vernonpress.com

Contact Email:

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Deadline for Submissions, September 30, 2020

Becoming the Obamas: Critical Approaches to Barack & Michelle Obama’s Memoirs

deadline for submissions:
September 30, 2020
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
Convention in Buffalo, New York, Mar. 11–14, 2021
contact email:

This year marks the 25th anniversary of Barack Obama’s memoir Dreams from My Father (1995). Praised by Toni Morrison and Philip Roth, Obama’s memoir explores his life up to his admission to Harvard Law School in 1988. More recently, 2018 saw the publication of Michelle Obama’s best-selling memoir Becoming, which is the story of her life up through the end of her tenure as first lady. This panel seeks papers that critically explore the major prose works by Barack and Michelle Obama: Becoming, Dreams From My Father, and The Audacity of Hope.

Questions to consider include, but are not limited to:

How do the Obamas tell their story? What literary devices and/or rhetorical strategies do they employ in their respective works?

How are their memoirs rooted in the African American literary tradition? Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man clearly influenced Barack Obama’s Dreams, yet who else did Obama invoke in telling his story? Who, if any, are Michelle Obama’s literary influences in Becoming?

How do the Obamas extend or complicate the specific category of Black Autobiography? How do their texts compare/contrast with other memoirs – either contemporary or canonical texts?

How does Becoming compare/contrast with Barack Obama’s Dreams of My Father?

How do the Obamas depict race/racism and/or intersectionality in their texts?

How can we teach Becoming, Dreams From My Father, and/or The Audacity of Hope to our twenty-first century students?

All submissions that explore the life writings of Barack and/or Michelle Obama will be considered. They do not need to be comparative in scope, though they can be. To submit to this panel, please upload your 250 word abstract to NEMLA’s submission portal
at https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/Login.

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Deadline for Submissions, September 30, 2020

British Travels to the Americas During the Long 19th Century (9/30/2020; 3/11-14/2021) Philadelphia–NEMLA

This panel seeks to investigate cross-cultural and intercultural exchanges in British literature produced by men and women who traveled to and from the Americas (North, Central, and South) during the long 19th century (1750-1900). It provides a critical examination of the ideological underpinnings and socio-political reasoning for the production of British travel narratives as well as the effects they had on the construction of identity, race, and gender in American and British territories during this period. In doing so, we hope to challenge established academic disciplinary boundaries and provide new insights into the intricate relationships between transatlantic literature, identity, and politics. Proposed essays may focus but are not limited to the following topics: the construction of the “I” and the “Other(s); gendered bodies and empires; British and US-American conflicts and expansions; representations of Amerindian, Afro-American, and mixed culture(s); interactions and negotiations between indigenous peoples and imperial powers; the economy and politics of slavery; and demonstrations of acceptance and resistance by newly-independent and/or formed nations.

We are particularly interested in papers that are interdisciplinary in nature, and that employ theoretical modes such as critical race studies, gender studies, transatlantic studies, and theories of empire-building.

Direct link to this panel: https://cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/18950

Please submit abstracts online via the NeMLA portal by September 30, 2020: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/CFP

If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact Dr. Jose Lara, Chair of this panel, at j1lara@bridgew.edu

Contact Info:
José I. Lara, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Bridgewater State University
Department of Global Languages & Literatures
Bridgewater MA 02325
Contact Email:

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Deadline for Proposals, October 31, 2020

Call for Book Chapters for edited volume: Mountains and Memoir

deadline for submissions:
October 31, 2020
full name / name of organization:
Jenny Hall and Martin Hall

Mountaineering and Climbing have become extraordinarily popular lifestyle sports. More generally, mountain-going has been one of the fastest growing leisure activities of the past thirty years where an estimated, ‘10 million Americans go mountaineering annually’ (Macfarlane, 2004: 17) and In the United Kingdom 2.48 million people participate in recreational rock climbing and mountaineering (Mintel, 2018). The American Alpine Club, in their annual State of Climbing Report noted that in 2018 there were ‘7.7 million’ American climbers (2019: 6), ‘2,500 licenced USA climbing athletes’ (2019: 10) and that in 2017, ‘climbing as a whole contributed $12,450,000,000 to the economy’ (2019: 13), where in the UK, the British Mountaineering Council (BMC) membership currently stands at 76,000 individuals and 320 clubs.

Dr Jenny Hall and Dr Martin Hall are editing a volume exploring the relationships between mountains and mountaineering, literature, media, film and popular culture. At current, the edited volume which is being proposed focusses on mountains and memory in popular culture, particularly looking at the literary memoir and its closeness and association with film and other media forms. The mountaineering memoir has a long and rich tradition. Extreme adventure memoirs are the stuff of legend and Hollywood movies. In Memoir: A History, Ben Yagoda makes the salient point that, ‘Memoir has become the central form of the culture’ and it this centrality and significance which drives the call for this book. Yet there is a paucity of scholarship that explores the mountaineering memoir as a powerful social influence these texts have had on our understanding of how mountains are constructed, reproduced and performed.

Dianne Chisolm described the distinguished Lynn Hill’s 2002 book, Climbing Free as ‘the first history of free climbing and one of the first climbing histories ever to be presented from a woman’s perspective’ and mountaineers such as the eminently well-known Chris Bonington speak of a ‘boost in income from newspaper rights and the sudden rush of lectures’ (2017: 98) when as a result of his climbs, ‘every national newspaper ran a banner headline’ (2017: 97). Two central themes are covered, firstly, this book intends to interrogate is the relationship between these feats and the attention given them throughout the media and in the documented accounts by the climbers themselves. Secondly, we ask, to what extent do mountaineering texts create, rather than mirror reality, and how sustainable is this genre? Climbing and mountaineering texts from memoirs to documentaries are direct influencers for the ecological consciousness of athletes, authors, filmmakers and crucially their audiences. If more of these texts were as successful as Alex Honould’s Academy and BAFTA awarding winning film, Free Solo, the ramifications of influence could be enormous. Sustainability is a central theme of this book and concerns the body in the context of mountain spaces and places and as such considers the histographic influences of the sublime, and how and why this is embodied in living memory and performance through texts and films. The aim is to proliferate the powerful message that these books and films expound and problematize the neoliberal commercialisation of these highly sensitive mountain spaces and places through textual sources. Given that the UN Climate Change Summit is due to take place in Glasgow, United Kingdom in November 2020 this book will challenge the dominant narrative of consumption in these leisure and tourism spaces and how we engage with sensitive mountain environments and the communities.

Through a broadly interdisciplinary approach which calls for scholarship across philosophy, geography, social psychology, sport, literature, film studies and wider scope, the editors are looking for chapters which interrogate and elucidate upon the representation and prominence of mountaineering, in its widest meaning, in the memoir and its associated paratexts through film and television.

Concepts may include but are not limited to:

  • Gender
  • Sexuality
  • Race
  • Disability
  • Sustainability/Environment
  • Education
  • Fitness
  • Wellbeing/Mental Health
  • Widening Participation
  • Travel/Borders/Transnationalism
  • Genre
  • Reality/Truth/Authenticity
  • Reification of the mountaineering hero
  • Deviant leisure
  • Globalism/localism/Covid-ism
  • Spirituality/Sublime
  • Haptics/Sensuality
  • Emotion
  • Politics/Governance
  • Subversion
  • Elitism/Exclusivity
  • Femininity/Masculinity
  • Death/Risk/Exposure

Please submit a 300-word extract and a 200-word bio to mountainmemoirproject@gmail.com by October 31st

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Submission Deadline Nov. 1, 2020

Angelaki

Special Issue on Witnessing After the Human

Volume 27, Issue 2 (2022)
Deadline for indications of interest–Nov. 1, 2020.

Guest Editors

  1. Michael Richardson

Michael.Richardson@unsw.edu.au

Senior Research Fellow (ARC DECRA)

University of New South Wales

  1. Magdalena Zolkos

Zolkos@em.uni-frankfurt.de  

Humboldt Research Fellow

Goethe University Frankfurt

Special Issue Description
Until recently, scholarship on testimonial practice in literature, media and culture has assumed that witnessing applies primarily to a human subject. This is evident in the evolution of the meaning of the word ‘witness’ in public discourses and scholarly literature alike: from representative of a persecuted minority who addresses a community of nations to testify to their plight, to the survivor of atrocity, to the figure of an empathetic humanitarian activist or social media user, who is proximate to mass violence, though not its direct target. In politics, law, religion and science, it has been taken for granted that bearing witness is a human capacity, often imagined as a verbal act of narrativization of violence. For some, that act included production of evidence and demonstration of truth; for others, it implied a proximity to catastrophic events, and had ethical implications of making demands on the listeners. Recently, witnessing has been extended to non-human subjects, such as plants, animals and artificial intelligences; re-imagined through diverse scientific and technological vistas; as well as applied to inanimate entities, such as cultural productions, geological items, or, as in the ‘forensic aesthetics’ approach, to human remains. This extension of the status of the witness and practices of witnessing to the nonhuman has profound implications for witnessing theory.

With this Special Issue of Angelakiwe seek to create a platform for articulating and exploring the meanings of witnessing ‘after the human’ from diverse disciplinary perspectives. We ask about the epistemological, aesthetic, political and ethical effects of extending the practice of witnessing from the human subject to diverse categories of non-human beings, such as animals, plants, cyborgs, machines, and inanimate objects, as endowed with a capacity akin to ‘testimonial affordance’ and as potential producers of testimonial knowledge. We explore the possibilities within contemporary theorizing of testimony to reveal and to work beyond the limits of the humanist imaginary of the witness as a historical agent, often in tandem with thinking from feminist, queer, Indigenous, disability, critical race and whiteness studies that has done so much to expose the limitations and violences inherent to ‘the human’ as a framework for subjectivity.  Finally, we seek to uncouple the association between witnessing and speech, or verbal articulation, through attention to the role of senses, silence, affect, gesture, code, materiality and other communicative modes in testimonial practice. From the perspective of witnessing ‘after the human’, testimony appears as a prosthetic practice, both because of the importance of technological and machinic mediations of testimony today, and, more generally, as an example of prosthetikos:the process of adding onto the body.

Possible Topics For Submissions 

We invite cross-disciplinary contributions, focusing on the practices, processes and subjects of witnessing from the angle of (broadly defined) post-humanities. We are interested in philosophic, literary, cultural, sociological, political, ethnographic, and other, engagements with the question of witnessing ‘after the human’. The topics for submissions include, but are not limited to:

  1. Animals and witnessing;
  2. Plants and witnessing;
  3. Inanimate witnessing, including ‘memory objects’ and ‘trauma objects’;
  4. Machines and witnessing; cyborg testimony;
  5. Environmental witnessing; climate change testimony, including ‘planetary grief’ and solastalgic perspectives on witnessing;
  6. Critical epistemology of witnessing; testimonial credibility and truth;
  7. The time of witnessing; non-/post-human testimonial temporalities;
  8. Testimonial aesthetics and poetics of the post-human;
  9. ‘Decolonizing witnessing’; critical race perspectives on testimony;
  10. Queering testimony;
  11. Sensorial perspectives on witnessing; non-occulocentric witnessing, testimony and listening, testimony and touch;
  12. Silence and witnessing; gestural witnessing;
  13. Imaginal testimony;
  14. Neuroscience and witnessing;
  15. Technology and witnessing;
  16. Science and witnessing; algorithmic witnessing; witnessing through data;
  17. Social media technologies and witnessing.

Time-line for Submissions

  • Indications of interest are invited by November 01, 2020. The indications of interest should include a title and ca. 500-words-long abstract.
  • The editors will communicate to the authors whether the abstracts have been accepted by December 01, 2020.
  • The authors are requested to submit their articles by June 01, 2021.
  • The editorial and blind peer-review process will take place after June 01, with final manuscripts to be completed by October 01, 20201.
Contact Info:

Magdalena Zolkos

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Deadline for Proposals, November 29, 2020

From Combat to Commemoration. Veteran Politics and Memory: A Global Perspective (11/29/2020; 4/16-17/2021) United Kingdom

Department of History, University of Warwick
16th and 17th April 2021

From the fields of Gettysburg to the beaches of Normandy, the participation and presence of former soldiers has been an integral part of the memorial culture of many conflicts. As survivors of war, veterans are often portrayed a group imbued with a unique knowledge whose experiences should not be forgotten. Yet while public commemorations have sought to establish consensus about the meaning of the past, veterans’ memories have also been a source of conflict and contestation, engaged in struggles over rights, recognition, and the authority to remember the past and speak for the future.

In a recent article in War & History,Grace Huxford et al. note that the historically unprecedented number of veterans across the world during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries has ensured not just that veterans ‘occupy a significant place in modern history but that they are also a vital lens through which to analyse the changing relationship between war and society’. Veterans, however, are from being a modern phenomenon –estimates suggest that a larger proportion of the English population fought in the Civil Wars of the mid-seventeenth century than in World War One. Moreover, though veteran studies has become a rich field of interdisciplinary enquiry, studies tend to be embedded in their own geographic and historical contexts: the transtemporal and transnational study of veterans remains in its infancy.

This conference seeks to bring together scholars from across time and space to explore the experience of veterans, and particularly the politics of veteran memory and commemoration, from a global, comparative perspective. We hope to publish the resulting papers in an edited collection that will approach veteran memory from a range of different disciplinary, temporal, and geographic perspectives.

Proposals are invited for 20-minute papers that discuss any aspect of veteran politics and memory, from the ancient world to the present. Complete panel proposals are also very welcome (panels/papers which seek to explore different conflicts/countries/periods are especially encouraged). Possible themes include, but are by no means limited to:

  • Commemoration and memory
  • Veteran social movements and associations
  • Veteran cultural contributions (documentary evidence, art, etc.)
  • Political power of veterans
  • Veteran trauma, health and emotions
  • Veteran protest and dissent
  • (Inter)national veteran networks
  • Family and intergenerational memory
  • Monuments, statues, and re-enactments
  • Travel and battlefield tourism
  • Museums and heritage

Please submit paper abstracts (max. 300 words) and brief bio(s) to both imogen.peck@warwick.ac.uk and timo.schrader@warwick.ac.uk by 29th November 2020. Participants will be notified of decisions by the end of December 2020.

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Deadline for Submissions: 15 December 2020.

Announcement: Call-for-Papers

Deadline: December 15, 2020

This call is for submissions for an international edited collection entitled Taking Control: the critical and creative uses of digital tools in the now, the foreseeable future, and beyond, in screen, literature, and the visual arts.

Taking Control seeks to examine the current uses, and the potential for expansion and extension, and possible future uses of AI in relation to screen and literature and visual culture texts and narratives; as well as the little explored angle of cultural criticism and cultural meaning in those human-AI assisted productions.

Suggestions for potential contributions to Taking Control are: how the use of AI in these productions may sharpen, and ask for answers to, big questions that intersect with our society and environment and worlds; encourage further research that opens new possibilities as well as an open-mindedness in the quest for a deeper understanding; create platforms that cross cultures and borders, to become inter- and multidisciplinary; provide immediate access to resources that we can trust to provide accurate information, and that is enriching and productive; and bring to the table a common “language” that can create a shared experience, with the potential to cross borders into other disciplines, and sustain our cultural heritage. The aim of Taking Control is to highlight the human-AI blend in creativity as a vibrant multidisciplinary thematic area where we urgently need better understanding and clear parameters to judge success and failure.

Technology can be misused, yet in the human-AI blend humans have the power to intervene. In these interactions, there is the potential to take things to a different level. The power of the human, the ability to think differently, and critically and creatively, together with the technical abilities of the immediate computer for holding, sorting, and providing masses of big data, hold out the possibility of expanded human creativity. When you choose and use information fairly, it makes the outcome compelling and accurate. AI affects what people look for; what they enter, and how they respond, and what that reveals and changes about the people, can affect our societies and cultures. Wherever you add questions about our environment, for instance, AI it sharpens it so we can relate to it.  Thus, how it relates to the human experience, to our world, and human society, much depends on how we manage it, where we take it and what we do with it.

Questions remain: In what ways can human-AI assisted screen, literature and visual culture texts and narratives expand, grow, and bring deeper understanding of ourselves, our worlds, our environment, our culture and society, and bring about change?  How do these works address cultural criticism, and social and cultural meanings, and add to our understanding of our cultures and society? What is the potential for exploring human experience and that connect to our world, and the possible import of these productions for the future? Admittedly, there are differing views and opinions on the future of AI. Some think an Artificial General Intelligence  can exist and others think not. What does all this mean for our future society and culture?
At this initial stage, in lieu of “chapters,” this proposed work, Taking Control, calls for extended abstracts for consideration for inclusion in the book.
Submission instructions:

  1. The extended abstracts must be more than 1,000 and less than 1,500 words.

(Full-length chapters of 6,000 – 7,000words each (including notes but excluding references lists, title of work, and key words) will be solicited from these abstracts.)

  1. Please keep in mind that your essay-chapter will be written from your extended abstract. Your abstract will carry the same title as your essay-chapter.
  2. To be considered, abstracts must be written in English, and submitted as a Word document.
  3. When writing your abstract use Times New Roman point 12,and 1.15 spacing.
  4. At the beginning of your extended abstract, immediately after the title of your work and your name, add 5 to 8 keywords that best relate to your work.
  5. Use the Chicago Manual of Style 16th Edition.
  6. Since this work is for Palgrave Macmillan UK, please use English spelling not American English spelling.
  7. Use endnotes not footnotes, use counting numbers not Roman numerals, and keep the endnotes to a bare minimum, working the information into the text where possible.
  8. Do cite all your work in your extended abstract as you would in a full chapter.

a) in the body of the abstract, add parenthetical in-text citations (family name of author and year, and page number/s) (e.g. Smith 2019, 230);
b) fully reference all in-text citations in alphabetical order, in the References list at the end of your abstract.

  1. Please send your abstract and your documents as attachments to an email. At the same time as submitting your extended abstract, in separate documents please send the following:
  • Your covering letter, giving your academic title/s, affiliation, your position, and your home and telephone, and email contact details;
  • A short bio of no more than 200 words;
  • Your C.V., giving your publications to date, and the publishing details and dates.

Papers should be forwarded to:
Jo Parnell
Jo.Parnell@newcastle.edu.au  alternatively annette.parnell@newcastle.edu.au  or joandbobparnell@bigpond.com

Deadline for abstracts: 15 December 2020.

Editor:
Dr Jo Parnell,
Conjoint Research Fellow,
Faculty of Education and Arts,
School of Humanities and Social Science,
University of Newcastle, Australia.

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Deadline for Submissions, January 31, 2021

Making a Murderer: True Crime in Contemporary American Popular Culture

Crime Fiction Studies

“Everybody’s fascinated with the notion that there is a cause and effect,” claims notorious serial killer Ted Bundy, quoted in the Netflix original, Conversations with a Killer: The Ted Bundy Tapes (2019) – that we can “put our finger on it,” and reassuringly rationalise the genesis of the uniquely modern phenomenon of the American serial killer. But when there is “absolutely nothing” in the background of a serial murderer that would lead one to believe they were “capable of committing murder,” how do we begin to acclimatise ourselves to this violent defect of contemporary history? More challengingly, how do we bring depth to our collective portrait of what constitutes a murderer, so that we may then self-exempt our compulsion to look more closely at these perversely familiar figures?

Over the last 50 years, a plethora of books, magazines, film and television adaptations on the subject of true crime has captured – and held – the public imagination in a vice-like grip, ultimately achieving cult status in postwar-American society while furthermore granting the white male serial killer the kind of cultural capital usually awarded only to celebrities. With the enormous popularity of such series as Making a Murderer (2015) and Mindhunter (2017), however, it seems like now, more than ever, the uneasy question of why we continue to glorify killers by inserting them into mainstream media – and what exactly the appeal of this enduring genre and its mythologization of ultraviolent masculinities tells us about ‘who we are’ and the nature of American society itself – has acquired a new level of urgency, which, in turn, requires new depths of understanding. Likewise, with the growing Netflixisation of true crime, and the narrativization of true crime more broadly, now is the time to establish a study that evaluates the politics of the ever-increasing fine line between actual crime documentaries versus fictional shows that reference true crime.

Following the University of Edinburgh’s popular ‘True Crime’ workshop series, organised by Harriet Stilley and Victoria Madden and funded by the British Association for American Studies, we are delighted to announce the call for papers for ‘Making a Murderer: True Crime in Contemporary American Popular Culture.’ This special issue of the Edinburgh University Press Crime Fiction Studies journal capitalises on a recent swell of public interest in true crime narratives, offering informed analyses of the styles of violence, intimacy, sociality, and belief that constitute the abnormal normality of the world of true crime in the American cultural imagination. Specifically, this collection of essays will explore and evaluate the multiple, contested social and/or psychological significances of murderous crime in a range of discourses from the early twenty-first century, including – but not restricted to – film and television. In doing so, we seek to address a host of difficult moral, ethical, and social questions surrounding the study of true crime – questions that force us to confront both the cultural machinery of the genre as well as our role as consumers within this framework and yet, paradoxically, are often too easily ignored. We are thus asking for abstracts for this special issue that consider the correlations between recent true crime narratives and the broader culture within which they have become gravely significant in order to shed some more light on this important but often neglected area of study.

Possible topics for this special issue may include, but are in no way limited to:

  • True Crime and Neflix (the narrativisation of true crime more broadly)
  • True Crime as Contemporary Gothic Horror
  • The Legacy of the White Male Serial Killer
  • True Crime and Celebrity Culture
  • Hypermasculine Violence and Female ‘Victimhood’
  • The Female ‘Monster’ versus the Male ‘Icon’ (and the gender implications of this more broadly)
  • Abnormality versus Normality (and conceptions of the American family)
  • True Crime and Representations of Race

Abstracts of 400 words are due by 31st January 2021 and finished articles of 6500 words will be due in July 2021. This issue will be published in March 2022.

Please send abstracts and a biographical statement of 150 words to the editors Harriet Stilley and Victoria Madden at makingamurderercfs@gmail.com. We welcome all questions and inquiries.

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