Archived Postings

The deadlines have passed for the following listings, or they are notices of new issues of life writing journals. We provide this information here for points of reference for scholars interested in trends in the field.

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Workshop: „Identity Documents in Use” (University of Vienna, 22.9.–23.9.2022)

Organizer: Sigrid Wadauer

(FWF-Project “Co-Producing and Using Identity Documents. Habsburg Monarchy/Austria ca. 1850-1938”)

The workshop deals with the co-production and use of identity documents from a historical and interdisciplinary perspective. Establishing the identity of persons was (and still is) fundamental for a variety of tasks and operations of the state. In the course of the last centuries, various forms of identification and registration became subject to ever more precise state regulations and were adapted or fully taken over by state authorities. Yet, at the same time, practices of identification, registration and categorization of individuals were never exclusively a matter of statehood and citizenship, subject to governmentality, bureaucracy, surveillance and migration control. Identity papers were not exclusively produced and used by or vis á vis state authorities. Historically, various parties could be (and remained) involved in practices of identification and registration, ranging from religious organizations, trade or occupational associations, employers, unions, political organisations, landlords, welfare organizations, companies, creditors, or recreation clubs. Such parties provided information, produced data, checked documents, or even issued their own papers. They fulfilled tasks assigned to them, while following or adopting regulations issued by authorities with (greater or lesser) enthusiasm or accuracy. At the same time, the parties involved in such tasks often pursued their own agendas, producing and using papers for their own purposes. Individuals – who in most cases are seen as wholly subjected to identification, surveillance, or control – contributed to the production of their official identities in a variety of ways: by complying with official directives and cooperating with authorities; by initiating administrative processes themselves, (co-)producing information, forging documents or dealing with missing or incoherent documents; and by avoiding or boycotting identification. It is not always apparent or conclusively established where in such entanglements state bureaucracy started or ended.

In order to investigate why certain forms of identification functioned historically as successful or failed, or were altered, or varied in an international context, the workshop will reflect on the diversity of contexts and constellations in which documents were produced and used and in which the parties involved interacted in consensus or conflict.

The workshop will take place from 22.9.to 23.9. 2022 at the University of Vienna (Main building, Universitätsring 1, 1010 Vienna, TP, seminar room 1 and 4 in a hybrid format.

Participation is free of charge, but registration is required. To register, please send an email to sigrid.wadauer@univie.ac.at before 12.9.2022.

Program

22.9.2022 SR 1  
   
9:00–9:20 Sigrid Wadauer (University of Vienna): Welcome and Introduction
   
  Documents – Local Authorities – Migration
  Chair: Sigrid Wadauer (University of Vienna)
9:20–10:00 Beate Althammer (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin): Registering Migrants in Prussian Cities (ca. 1880 to 1914)
10:00–10:40 Anne Winter (Vrije Universiteit Brussel) / Hilde Greefs (University of Antwerp / Zoom): Identity Documents of Foreign Migrants Arriving in Antwerp (1850–1910)
   
10:40–11:10 Coffee Break
   
  Documents – Citizenship – Interactions
11:10–11:50 Lida–Maria Dodou (University of Vienna / Austrian Archaeological Institute Athens): The Spectrum of Belonging: Austrian “de jure subjects”, “de facto subjects” and “protégés” in Fin–de–siècle Salonica
   
11:50–13:30 Lunch Break
    Chair: Jessica Richter (Institute of Rural History, St. Pölten)
13:30–14:10 Darren Wan (Cornell University): Brokering Citizenship: Illiteracy and Illegibility in the Production of Malayan Identity Documents, 1957–1963
14:10–14:50 Juanita Cox (University of London): Identification Documents: Practices and Perspectives from the Black British Caribbean Community
   
14:50–15:10 Coffee Break
   
  Documents and Categorization
   
15:10–15:50 Michal Turski (Center for Historical Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Berlin): Meanders of Ethnic Registration and Categorization of Polish Germans in the Lodz Region during World War II.
15:50–16:30 Christiane Weber (Arolsen Archives/Germany):  Who Decides Who is a DP? Post–World War II Identification Documents of Displaced Persons in the Arolsen Archives
   
16:30–16:50 Coffee Break  
16:50–17:30 András László Pap (Centre for Social Sciences Institute for Legal Studies/Budapest / Zoom): Ethno-racial Identity in Documents: from Registration to Construction
   
   
    23.9.2022 SR 4  
  Documents – Work, Control and Coercion
  Chair: Beate Althammer (Humboldt University zu Berlin)
9:00–9:40 Paolo Raspadori (University of Perugia): Demographic and Social Control Tool. Staff Papers of Industrial Companies as Identity Documents of Italian Workers (First Half of the Twentieth Century)
9:40–10:20 Bernard Kusena (University of Zimbabwe): Forced Labour Recruitment and the Political Economy of Identity Documents: Clandestine Migration and Other Everyday Forms of Resistance in Southern Rhodesia, 1890–1980
   
10:20–10:40 Coffee Break
   
10:40–11:20 Chris Holdridge (North–West University, Potchefstroom/South Africa): Convict Mobility and Emergent Regimes of Paperwork and Interpersonal Status in Port Cities of the Anglo World
   
  Illicit Uses and Forged Documents
  Chair: Johanna Wassholm (Åbo Akademi, Finland)
11:20–12:00 Cristina Diac (National Institute for the Study of Totalitarianism of the Romanian Academy): Navigating Multiple Identities. Romanian Communists and their Travels Abroad
   
12:00–13:30 Lunch Break
   
13:30–14:10 Burak Sayım (New York University Abu Dhabi / Zoom): Crossing the Frontier: The Comintern, Forged Passports, and the Making of Interwar Border Regimes  
14:10–14:30 Conclusions

With the kind support of:

FWF – Der Wissenschaftsfonds

Stadt Wien, MA 7 – Kultur, Wissenschafts- und Forschungsförderung

University of Vienna (FSP Global History, Department of Economic and Social History)

Contact Info: 

PD Dr. Sigrid Wadauer

Department of Economic and Social History

University of Vienna

Universitätsring 1

1010 Vienna

Austria

https://www.sigridwadauer.com/

Contact Email: 

Sigrid.Wadauer@univie.ac.at

URL: 

https://wirtschaftsgeschichte.univie.ac.at/

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Deadline for Submissions Sept. 10, 2022

Uppity Medieval Women Across the Globe  

International Congress on Medieval Studies (Michigan USA hybrid), and other potential conferences

(9/10/2022; 5/11-13/2023)

In 1998, Vicki Leon published Uppity Women of Medieval Times, providing brief vignettes of primarily European medieval women fitting the description. As the field of Medieval Studies has been taking a global turn, this proposal seeks to put European uppity women into a deeper and more substantial conversation with their global sisters, such as the Japanese Lady Murasaki Shikibu, the Indian Nur Jahan, the Nigerian Queen Amina, and the Arabic Walladabint al-Mustakfi, to name a few. Uppity medieval women transgress their patriarchally assigned positions of immanence, often with the pen, the sword, and through sex. In an attempt to break new ground, we seek contributions that explore uppity medieval women––both historical and fictional–– from global perspectives. Comparative perspectives that trace similar experiences are highly encouraged. Reading the Middle Ages from a broader vantage point that illustrates how women worldwide were facing comparable experiences and challenges helps us understand the Middle Ages and feminism through a new lens. 

Please email your 200-word abstract and a 100-word biography to Anita Obermeier (aobermei@unm.edu) and to Doaa Omran (Domran@unm.edu) by the 10th of September 2022

We are having online and face-to-face sessions at the International Congress on Medieval Studies (ICMS). Our two panels are titled “Assertive Medieval Women Across the Globe I” and “Assertive Medieval Women Across the Globe II (A Virtual Roundtable).” The deadline for abstract submission on the congress website is the 15th of September 2022. Here is the submission link: https://icms.confex.com/icms/2023/cfp.cgi

We are also considering organising panels at Leeds International Medieval Congress (IMC) https://www.imc.leeds.ac.uk/imc-2023/ and the Medieval Association of the Pacific (MAP) https://www.medievalpacific.org/annual-conference/ .

Since we are trying to get a critical manuscript for an edited volume, we are proposing this session for several conferences, although in different formats.  

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Deadline for Submissions, Sept. 1, 2022

The Amsterdam School of Regional, Transnational and European Studies (ARTES) currently has a vacant Postdoc researcher position as part of the broader field Cultural Heritage and Identity.

Postdoctoral researcher Amsterdam Diaries: Self-representation, Cultural Diversity, and Migration

https://vacatures.uva.nl/UvA/job/Postdoctoral-researcher-Amsterdam-Diaries-Self-representation%2C-Cultural-Diversity%2C-and-Migration/751074902/

Faculty/Services:  Faculty of Humanities

Educational level:  Promoted

Function type:  Academic Staff

Closing date:  1 September 2022

Vacancy number:  9819

The Amsterdam School of Regional, Transnational and European Studies (ARTES) currently has a vacant Postdoc researcher position as part of the broader field Cultural Heritage and Identity. Within this field the focus is on material and immaterial heritage, including digital Humanities and on Cultural Heritage and societal changes. ARTES is one of the five Research Schools within the Amsterdam Institute for Humanities Research.

What are you going to do

You will be part of an interdisciplinary research team that collects and analyzes diaries of ordinary people of the 19th and 20th centuries who wrote about their daily lives in Amsterdam. In the light of Amsterdam’s 750th anniversary in 2025, the team investigates what diaries can tell us about lived and narrated experiences of Amsterdam as a multicultural city. We will use a flexible conception of ‘diary’ in order to include other forms of self-representation, such as drawings or self-recorded stories on cassette tape.

First, you will help organize a diary donating campaign in cooperation with the Dutch Diary Archive and the Amsterdam Museum in order to collect new diaries. We will focus on migrant ego-documents because these are underrepresented in archives and scholarly research. The task is to involve local communities and gain support to help build a more inclusive and diverse diary-collection. Knowledge of the history of migrants, as well as relevant languages, will be an asset.

Second, you will study representations of self and the city in a selection of diaries from the newly gained materials as well as from archives such as the Dutch Diary Archive, Stadsarchief, Joods historisch Museum, Atria, Niod, Black Archives, IHLIA, and xpatarchive. The aim is to understand how individuals with diverse socio-cultural backgrounds express feelings of (non-)belonging, and in what ways they narrate their experiences of (intercultural) spaces, encounters and connections and their sense of what is familiar and foreign.

Third, you will help developing tools from Digital Humanities to store and map historical information about diaries and diarists in their spatial and temporal contexts. You will contribute to creating a digital resource, similar to (or as part of) the Amsterdam Time Machine, which will enable users to ‘travel back in time and navigate the city on the levels of neighborhoods, streets, houses and rooms’ (https://www.amsterdamtimemachine.nl/). Ideally, this will connect stories from multiple perspectives to particular places such as streets, parks, bars and buildings.

Your tasks and responsibilities:

  • conducting research, presenting intermediate research results at workshops and conferences and publishing two single-authored, peer reviewed articles;
  • participating in meetings of the project research group and developing a shared database;
  • co-organising knowledge dissemination activities.

What do you have to offer

Your experience and profile:

  • a PhD in the Humanities;
  • excellent research skills demonstrated by a track record of publishing in high-ranking journals and/or with leading presses or a demonstrable capacity to develop such a record;
  • a strong cooperative attitude and willingness to engage in collaborative research;
  • enthusiasm for communicating academic research to non-academic audiences;
  • excellent command English.

What can we offer you

The Postdoc researcher will be appointed at the Department of History, European Studies and Religious Studies of the Faculty of Humanities at the University of Amsterdam and will conduct the research in ARTES. The employment contract will be for one year. Contingent on a positive performance evaluation the contract will be extended with one year. The employment contract is for 30,4-38 hours a week. Preferred starting date is 01 October 2022.

The gross monthly salary, based on 38 hours per week and relevant experience, ranges between € 3,974,00 to € 5,439,00. This sum does not include the 8% holiday allowance and the 8,3% year-end allowance. A favourable tax agreement, the ‘30% ruling’, may apply to non-Dutch applicants. The Collective Labour Agreement of Dutch Universities is applicable.

What else do we offer

  • excellent possibilities for further professional development and education, including participation in a dedicated Research Training group;
  • an enthusiastic, inspiring and professional academic team;
  • the opportunity to collaborate with leading researchers at research institutes that – partly as a result of their interdisciplinary approach – are world renowned.

About us

The University of Amsterdam is the Netherlands’ largest university, offering the widest range of academic programmes. At the UvA, 30,000 students, 6,000 staff members and 3,000 PhD candidates study and work in a diverse range of fields, connected by a culture of curiosity.

The Faculty of Humanities provides education and conducts research with a strong international profile in a large number of disciplines in de field of language and culture. Located in the heart of Amsterdam, the faculty maintains close ties with many cultural institutes in the capital city. Research and teaching staff focus on interdisciplinary collaboration and are active in several teaching programmes.

Want to know more about our organisation? Read more about working at the University of Amsterdam.

Questions

Do you have any questions or do you require additional information? Please contact:

Job application

If you feel the profile fits you, and you are interested in the job, we look forward to receiving your application. You can apply online via the link below. The deadline for applying for this vacancy is 01 September 2022.

Applications should include the following information (submitted in one pdf):

  • A letter of motivation.
  • A research proposal of 800-1000 words, explaining how you would approach the project thematically, conceptually and methodologically, within the timeline of the 2 years appointment.
  • A full academic CV, including a list of publications.
  • The names and contact details of two references who may be approached by the selection committee.

Only complete applications received within the response period via the link below will be considered.

The interviews will be held in the course of the first weeks of September 2022.

The UvA is an equal-opportunity employer. We prioritise diversity and are committed to creating an inclusive environment for everyone. We value a spirit of enquiry and perseverance, provide the space to keep asking questions, and promote a culture of curiosity and creativity.

If you encounter Error GBB451, reach out to our HR Department directly. They will gladly help you continue your application.

No agencies please *

Call for Contributors

Dictionary of Literary Biography, vol. 393 (Twenty-First Century Indigenous Fiction Writers in the United States and Canada), edited by Derek C. Maus (State University of New York at Potsdam, which sits on unceded Haudenosaunee territory)

deadline for submissions: August 1, 2022

I am seeking scholars – a range that includes doctoral students through emeritus/emerita faculty – interested in contributing to a new volume in Gale’s Dictionary of Literary Biography series. Upon its contracted publication in the summer of 2023, this resource will fill a massive gap in the biographical and bibliographic coverage of contemporary Indigenous authors of fiction living and working within the settler nations of the United States and Canada. It has been nearly a quarter-century since volume 175 of this series covered “Native American Writers of the United States” (1997) and although a handful of major figures from the latter half of the twentieth century have been covered in other DLB volumes, no comprehensive volume dedicated to a broad overview of post-“Native American Renaissance” Indigenous writing has yet been produced as part of this important reference source.

With the publication of When the Light of the World Was Subdued, Our Songs Came Through: A Norton Anthology of Native Nations Poetry (ed. Joy Harjo, Leanne Howe, et al.) in 2020, Indigenous poetry received a major boost in mainstream visibility. Although the intent of that volume and the Dictionary of Literary Biography is somewhat different, my hope is that this volume can shine a similarly bright light on a broad sampling of Indigenous authors who have published works of fiction since 1997, the last time DLB published a volume exclusively focused on Indigenous writers.

I would especially like to use this volume to cover a number of emerging or otherwise lesser-known writers who have not received previous attention within this series. For this reason, the list of names for whom I am seeking bio-/bibliographic entries includes numerous authors whose published body of work to date includes only one or two book-length works, often ones that appeared in the last few years. It is absolutely essential to recognize and to recontextualize such eminent authors such as Sherman Alexie, Louise Erdrich, Linda Hogan, Thomas King, and Gerald Vizenor, all of whom have all continued publishing fiction since their inclusion in vol. 175. However, no adequate overview of the full diversity of fiction published by Indigenous authors in the past two decades exists and this volume is well-positioned to fill that gap. Therefore, I have included more names of authors than can ultimately be covered in the volume, but I have done so with the hope of casting as wide a net as possible. If there are other authors who you believe merit coverage, please do not hesitate in suggesting them to me as there are surely gaps in my own experience of contemporary Indigenous fiction.

Alongside authors of fairly conventional “literary” fiction, I have also included some authors primarily known for “young adult” fiction as well as some whose work is primarily graphic fiction. I have also included a handful of figures (e.g., Tomson Highway) who are known far more for their work in other genres than fiction. The essays in this collection should focus only on their subject’s published works of fiction since 1997, though there obviously will be occasions for making reference to earlier works and/or works in other genres/media.

In recognition of the added logistical and mental/emotional complications brought on by the upheaval in academic working conditions, completed essays for the collection are due as e-mail attachments by August 1, 2022. The word-counts (which include bibliographic data) included for each entry in the linked spreadsheet are fairly firm, though they can be exceeded in some exceptional instances if negotiated in advance. Gale compensates authors in this series for entries at a rate of $40 per 1000 words (as listed in the spreadsheet); thus, a 3000-word entry earns $120, a 5000-word entry earns $200, etc. I sincerely wish this could be more, but I am grateful that any resources are being set aside to make this project a reality, because it is long overdue.

If you are interested in contributing to this project, please send me an email at mausdc@potsdam.edu and I will send you the current list of “unclaimed” authors. If you have the time, the inclination, and the mental energy to contribute to this project, I sincerely invite you to do so. I am happy to answer any additional questions about the book, the series, or any other aspect of the project via e-mail. Derek C. Maus, editor   contact email: mausdc@potsdam.edu

Themed Journal Issue on “Narrative and Identity”

The Australasian Journal of Popular Culture

deadline for submissions:

July 10, 2022

lorna.piatti-farnell@aut.ac.nz

The call for papers for the next issue of the Australasian Journal of Popular Culture (Issue 11.1-2), on the general theme of ‘narrative and identity’, is now open.

Article submissions on any aspect of the theme are encouraged. The Issue’s Editors particulalry invite articles on the following topics:

– self-representation on social media
– representations of disability and neurodiversity in popular culture
– re-inventions of genre and viewership/readership in popular culture
– alternative realities and modes of storytelling in (video) games
– online fandoms and identity
– popular icons

The deadline for submissions of full articles (5-6k words) is 10 July 2022. The Journal is indexed in SCOPUS (among others), and its remit is broad and international. Further information about the Journal can be found here: https://www.intellectbooks.com/the-australasian-journal-of-popular-culture

Please submit your articles for consideration (together with a short bio and insitutional affiliation) to both editors: Professor Lorna Piatti-Farnell (lorna.piatti-farnell@aut.ac.nz) and Dr Ashleigh Prosser (ashleigh.prosser@uwa.edu.au).

The Issue will be published (both in print and electronically) in December 2022

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Deadline for Submissions July 15, 2022

Call for Papers for proposed panel for South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA) 2022

November 11-13, 2022 in Jacksonville, FL

Autobiography: Changes in Form and Meaning

This interdisciplinary panel welcomes submissions on any aspect of change within life writing. With the proliferation of modes available for what Anna Poletti has termed “self-life-inscription,” and a concurrent rise in hybrid genres such as autofiction that challenge the assumed boundary between truth and fiction in autobiographical narrative, it is clear that the scope of what is considered autobiography is changing. This panel seeks to articulate these changes and explore how they are impacting our understanding of the meaning and significance of life writing. Papers might explore changes in the medium of autobiography, such as social media, photography, film, graphic narratives, material collections, or performance. Papers might also address changes within established forms such as confession, memoir, the personal essay, or the diary. Theoretical considerations of change, transformation, or conversion within autobiography would also be welcome. By July 15th, please submit an abstract of 250 words, a brief bio, and any A/V or scheduling requests to Kimberly Hall, Wofford College, at hallka@wofford.edu

The SAMLA Conference will be held at the Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront. For additional conference information, please see the SAMLA website: https://samla.memberclicks.net.

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CFP: Out of Confinement: Creativity in Constraint

Women in French Studies Special Issue (2024)

July 15, 2022

contact email:

youna_kwak@redlands.edu

We invite article submissions for a special topics issue of Women in French Studies (2024) to explore work created by confined women and work that represents confined women, from the early modern period to the present-day. The special issue will explore how the confinement of women as depicted in fictional and non-fictional texts (in any media) informs, reflects and interrogates gendered conditions of existence. How have confined women been represented in literature, film and art? What kind of thinking or writing is produced by women out of conditions of confinement? What are the impacts of confinement on creative production? How does physical confinement change how we consume texts?

In March 2020, the word confinement suddenly became an unwelcome part of our everyday lexicon, as lockdown, quarantine, and stay-at-home orders were issued worldwide to curb the spread of the coronavirus pandemic. Within the household, mandatory confinement exacerbated women’s perennially uneven obligation to engage in invisible labor—whether middle-class women working from home, or working-class women compelled to risk their health so that others could abide by the imperative to stay in. Both within and outside the home, women were disproportionately tasked with “essential,” racialized and gendered, structurally invisible forms of labor, including childcare, cleaning, healthcare, food preparation, and eldercare.

Since the early modern period, accounts of women’s experiences in voluntary or forced confinement have been richly explored in works by French-language writers as diverse as Marie de France, Marguerite de Navarre, Assia Djebar, and Marie Darrieussecq, to name a few. On the one hand, representations of confinement can confirm that gender disparities are exacerbated when burdens are unequally shouldered by women during periods of confinement. On the other hand, representations of cloister or retreat that express the fantasy of liberatory or self-actualizing confinement, in explicitly repudiating familial or social obligations, can unsettle the caregiving roles traditionally assigned to women, as spouses, mothers, or daughters.

We invite proposals from all historic periods, genres, and geographic regions.

Suggested topics

  • cloisters, convents
  • imprisonment, incarceration
  • internment
  • segregated confinement (solitary confinement))/home confinement (house arrest)
  • stay-at-home mothers (domestic confinement)
  • the “hold” and conditions of enslavement
  • COVID-19 “Stay-at-home” orders
  • sanatoriums/illness/disease
  • childbirth/bedrest
  • anchorites and anchoresses
  • hostage situations/kidnapping
  • asylums
  • disability, design and space
  • bourgeois refuge, rural life, the “country house”
  • artist studio, artist space, residency, retreat

Abstracts of 250-300 words, in French or in English should be sent to Youna Kwak (youna_kwak@redlands.edu) and Anne Brancky (anbrancky@vassar.edu) by July 15, 2022. Notification of acceptance will be made by September 1, 2022, with final drafts of selected articles due April 2023. Articles will be subject to peer review. Authors must be current members of Women in French at the time of publication.

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Call for Papers

Women and Hollywood: Tales of Inequality, Abuse and Resistance in the Dream Factory

Edited by Karen McNally

Abstract Deadline: Friday 15 July 2022

Responses to the Amber Heard/Johnny Depp defamation trial prompt numerous questions about the reception of Hollywood movie stardom as legal cases of abuse play out in the combined ages of television and social media. Moreover, the layered gender dynamics can be contextualized within a contemporary framework of exposure and resistance that includes the imprisonment of Harvey Weinstein on rape and sexual assault charges, and the pay inequalities publicized by actresses including Michelle Williams and Octavia Spencer. Amplified by the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements, as well as by organizations and initiatives such as the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media and Black Women’s Equal Pay Day, issues of inequality and various forms of abuse have become central to our understanding of the female experience of contemporary Hollywood.

Yet these narratives are far from revelatory, hidden or limited to a contemporary context. The power imbalances and mistreatment that have partly defined women’s careers in the American film industry are as long-established as they are persistent, built into the structure of Hollywood and stretching across its entire history. From the euphemistically- termed ‘casting couch’ to the control of stars’ reproductive choices, and from the indirect expulsion of female directors (O’Hara, 2021), to male ownership of women’s work (McLean, 2022) and the multiple limitations placed upon women of colour, the professional experience in Hollywood for women has consistently been different from that of their male colleagues. These inequalities have at the same time been both enacted and challenged in plain sight. Backstudio pictures (Cohan, 2019) and stardom films (McNally, 2021) disturb their promotion of Hollywood mythology with characters who negotiate their professional lives around these gendered obstacles; historical films and TV dramas revisit and revise these myths with alternative histories; and biopics, documentaries, press articles, television interviews, biographies, autobiographies and social media become sites of disclosure, resistance and activism. These storied spaces convey the extent to which abuse and inequality has become an historically pervasive and recognized aspect of women’s experience in the film industry and of the structural fabric of Hollywood.

This volume seeks a range of original essays that explore film, television and other media narratives depicting inequality and abuse as part of women’s professional and personal lives in Hollywood. The book aims to address both fictional and non-fictional narratives and to explore historical and contemporary case studies.

Areas of interest might include but are not limited to:

  • Conflict between Hollywood mythology and exposure of female experience in backstudio pictures and stardom films
  • Narratives of stars and other actors, directors, screenwriters, producers, costume designers
  • Implicit and explicit exposure in scandal magazines
  • The use of autobiography by female stars to construct alternative narratives
  • Screen narratives of Hollywood as activism
  • Documentary and alternative histories of Hollywood
  • Intersectional inequality in the experiences of women of colour
  • The male saviour and a patriarchal system
  • Sexual abuse as professional control
  • Depictions of the impact of ageism on women’s careers
  • Fact and fiction boundary crossing in the biopic
  • Specific eras of inequality for women in Hollywood
  • Narratives of individual and/or collective challenges to inequality
  • Press narratives of abuse cases
  • The impact of social media on narratives of inequality and abuse
  • Narratives of disappearance from the screen due to inequality or abuse
  • Exposing vs normalizing inequality and/or abuse through its depiction
  • Studio controls over relationships and reproductive choices
  • Hollywood narratives framed through historical context
  • The careless mistreatment of women’s bodies in narratives of Hollywood
  • Hollywood’s emotionally abusive relationship with women
  • The impact of women writers, directors and producers on the exposure of inequality and narratives of resistance

Chapter proposals should be submitted as a 300-400 word abstract to the editor, Dr Karen McNally, at womenandhollywoodbook@gmail.com by Friday 15 July 2022. Please include an author biography of 100-150 words. Final chapters will be 6,000 to 7,000 words and due by Friday 16 December 2022. Please feel free to email with any queries prior to submission of abstracts. A leading publisher is being approached for publication.

Works Cited:

Steven Cohan, Hollywood by Hollywood: The Backstudio Picture and the Mystique of Making Movies (Oxford: OUP, 2019)

Adrienne L. McLean, All for Beauty: Makeup and Hairdressing in Hollywood’s Studio Era (New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 2022)

Karen McNally, The Stardom Film (New York: Wallflower-Columbia University Press, 2021)

Helen O’Hara, Women vs Hollywood: The Fall and Rise of Women in Film (London: Little, Brown Book Group, 2021)

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Dr Karen McNally

Reader in American Film, Television and Cultural History

London Metropolitan University

Recent Publications:

American Television during a Television Presidency (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2022)

https://www.wsupress.wayne.edu/books/detail/american-television-during-television-presidency

The Stardom Film (New York: Wallflower-Columbia University Press, 2021)

http://cup.columbia.edu/book/the-stardom-film/9780231184014

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Life Narratives: Self-referential Proclamations

Journal of American Studies of Turkey (JAST): Special Issue on Life Narratives

Guest edited by Bilge Mutluay Çetintaş, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey

Deadline for Full-Text Submissions: July 15, 2022

American life writing has a long tradition starting with the diaries, journals, and captivity narratives kept by Pilgrims and Puritans such as Mary Rowlandson’s The Sovereignty and Goodness of God: Being a Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682), to more canonized life writings such as Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography (1791).

In their seminal book Reading Autobiography  (2010), Sidonie Smith and Julia Watson point out that “autobiography” refers to the traditional western mode of life writing that emerged during the Enlightenment in the late eighteenth century. Unfairly discrediting other life narrating forms, autobiography refers to the traditional representative self-writing of sovereign individuals. Thus, Smith and Watson prefer “life writing” or “life narratives” as an all inclusive umbrella term instead of “autobiography,” or the more flexible term “memoir.”

For postmodern and postcolonial critics, the “I” in self-representation is far from the coherent and unified essentialist individual of autobiographies. The self is a fragmented entity, created through the limitations of language and positioned in multiple discourses. In Autobiography and Postmodernism (1994), Leigh Gilmore observes the relationship between truth telling and agency as the core of all autobiographical narrations, complicated further by ideology, gender, identity, and authority. She views autobiographical acts as rooted in conventions and power relations by evoking Foucault’s conception of power, stating that self-referential narratives create “a cultural and discursive site of truth production in relation to the disciplinary boundary of punishment” (59).

In whatever form they may appear, life narratives are part of our lives in an increasing and overwhelming amount. The recent global (semi)forced pandemic lockdowns have  augmented the sharing and observing of daily life. Trying out recipes, body training, playing instruments, singing, or demonstrating various hobbies on web-based platforms have become statements of existence or acts of self-assertion. In response to destabilized and unsafe public spheres, domestic enclosures have transformed into permanent sites of renewed interest in autobiographical acts.

With this renewed “autobiographical turn” in mind, the guest editor of this issue of JAST seeks original, previously unpublished manuscripts on American life narratives, dealing with any period or subject. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Politics and poetics of American life writing
  • Critical studies on American life narratives
  • The limits, challenges, and possibilities of self-referential portrayals
  • The role of memory, agency, and authority in life narratives
  • Life writing in American poetry, novels or theater (fictionalized lives)
  • Life narratives in performance and the visual arts (autobiographical videos, street performance, photography, exhibitions, etc.)
  • Life narratives in TV series, movies, web-based channels, etc.
  • Online lives (digital life stories, social media, dating apps, etc.)
  • Genres of American life writing (apology, autofiction, autothanatography, biomythography, captivity narrative, diary, eco(auto)biography, gastrography, jockography, journal, letters, memoir, periautography, prison narratives, scriptotheraphy, slave narratives, spiritual narratives, travel narratives, witness narratives etc.)
  • Popular culture and life writing
  • American women’s life writing
  • Immigrant and ethnic life narratives
  • Family life-writing or collaborative life writing
  • Public figures and celebrity life writing
  • Graphic life narratives (autographics)
  • Life writing and consciousness raising
  • Activism and life writing
  • Hybridity, diaspora, and (forced) displacement in life narratives
  • Dis/ability and life writing
  • The global pandemic and life narratives
  • Teaching life narratives

Full-text manuscripts of between 6,000 and 8,000 words in MLA style (with parenthetical internal citations, a Works Cited page, minimal footnotes, and in Times New Roman 12-point font), should be emailed as Microsoft Word attachments to Bilge Mutluay Çetintaş (bilge.mutluay@gmail.com) by July 15, 2022. Please include an abstract (150 words), keywords, and a one-paragraph bio (150 words, written in the third-person) with all manuscripts. Topic inquiries are welcome prior to full-text submission.

Contact Info:

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Bilge Mutluay Çetintaş, Guest Editor

Contact Info:

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Bilge Mutluay Çetintaş

Contact Email:

bilge.mutluay@gmail.com

URL:

http://www.asat-jast.org/index.php/jast/call-for-papers

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Deadline for Submissions: July 30, 2022

Spaces/Places of Growing Up:

Mapping the Geographies of Childhood

International Phygital Conference organized by

The Department of English,

Ramakrishna Sarada Mission Vivekananda Vidyabhavan, Kolkata.

In collaboration with

The Critical Childhoods and Youth Studies Collective

15th and 16th September 2022

deadline for submissions: July 30, 2022

‘Growing up’ or the long and often arduous journey of (trans)formation from a child to an adult necessarily happens not only through developmental milestones (like important examinations or birthdays) but through countless exposures and experiences in the social/public and the personal/private worlds inhabited by the child. While parts of this process have been traditionally or normatively defined by aspects of child-rearing, pedagogy and cognitive psychology, the many and varied physical and virtual sites of this transformative journey have not drawn much critical attention or generated a scholarly discourse, particularly in the context of childhoods across the Indian subcontinent.

The conference wants to draw attention to and critically review the varied spaces and places, which the child inhabits during the years of growing up – areas which open up exposures and provide the experiences that are a crucial part of that complex and elusive process of moving towards adulthood. Broadly speaking, such sites include the physical and the material as well as the imaginative, the psychological and the liminal  – in short, any sphere that is a part of childhood and affects the growing-up of the child. Pedagogy and leisure, nation and family, school and home, fantasy and trauma all engender spaces/places within which lessons and skills are learnt, rebellions and/or allegiances are enacted and socio-cultural identities are formed. Also interesting is the fact that in practice, the lived experiences of children within these spheres, at times overlap with the so-called ‘adult’ worlds and such cracks, seepages and contingencies also have significant roles to play in the journey to adulthood. The conference aims to review and critique these sites of growing-up, to assess their roles and impact in childhoods past and present. Papers can address (but are in no way limited to) any of the following physical, material, social and psychological spaces of childhoods:

Homes, nurseries, kindergartens, schools, classrooms, playgrounds, parks, orphanages, refugee colonies, neighbourhoods

Games, picnics, holidays, excursions, adventures, travel

Books, comics, film and media, advertisements, songs, digital-games

Fantasies, dreams, nightmares, trauma, illnesses,

Nation, Race, Family, Caste, Gender

While studies based on textual analysis are not excluded, we are looking forward to papers that are interdisciplinary and intersectional in nature.  We welcome proposals from scholars, professors, doctoral and post-doctoral researchers, authors and practitioners from fields as diverse as Culture Studies, Psychology, Law, Human Rights, History, Sociology, Literature, Education, Design, Architecture, Media and Publishing.

Please submit abstracts (300 words) for papers (15 minutes presentation time) along with a short bio-note (150 words) via email to conference@rksmvv.ac.in by 30th July 2022. The conference will have a segment devoted to student papers. Students are welcome to submit abstracts (300 words) for mini papers/poster presentations (not exceeding 10 minutes) along with a brief bio-note (150 words) via email to conference@rksmvv.ac.in by 30th July 2022. All presentations will be in English. In case of any queries prior to your submission please don’t hesitate to write to us.

Conference venue:

(For physical presentation)

Auditorium, Ramakrishna Sarada Mission Vivekananda Vidyabhavan,

33, Sri Maa Sarada Sarani,

Kolkata – 700055

(For virtual presentations)

Zoom

Important Dates:

30th July 2022 – Last date for submission of abstracts

10th August 2022 – Notification for selected papers

30th August – Tentative schedule and details regarding conference registration, paid accommodation (if needed by participants) etc.

7th September 2022 – Submission of full papers (7000 words) and AV presentations

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Deadline for Submissions, July 30, 2022

CALL FOR CHAPTERS ‘STARS AND FRANCHISES’ EDITED COLLECTION

Sarah Thomas (University of Liverpool, UK) and Mark McKenna (Staffordshire University, UK)

contact email:

s.k.thomas@liverpool.ac.uk

This edited collection seeks to examine the intersections between two significant media systems: stardom and the franchise. It will explore the convergences, tensions and inter-dependences that star-driven texts and franchise cultures have constantly negotiated within the entertainment industry, on a global, historical and multiplatform scale. It aims to analyse franchise sites and strategies as significant nexus where an understanding of stars is created, managed and interpreted, and to analyse the place and value of the star to media franchise production.

Whilst not aiming to be exclusively contemporaneous in its outlook, the collection intervenes at a moment where Variety has argued that ‘IP, not actors, is the main attraction’ (Rubin & Lang 2021). A particularly Western-centric perspective, this statement is informed by – among other things – the increased dominance of Disney and the Marvel Universe and their pursuit of seemingly endless franchised, multiplatform entertainment that subsume countless Hollywood A-listers into those texts and contexts. From the digital de-ageing of established performers in the MCU, the rise of a young generation of stars (like Tom Holland) fluent in the fragmented media markets that often typify franchise cultures, to noteworthy conflicts around contract negotiations and image rights, and star ownership stakes in their franchise IP (Keanu Reeves and John Wick), significant shifts are occurring around star image, labour and agency in the midst of the asset value of media licensing and intellectual property.

The star-franchise intersection represents a tension between distinct forms of media marketing. Whilst these ‘two modes of product differentiation may converge [they] do not easily coalesce’ with contemporary stars ‘under pressure to support franchise world development, not supplant it’ (Lomax 2020: 188). In intellectual property networks like franchises, ‘stardom and celebrity persona take a back seat, replaced by character brands’ (Johnson 2008: 217). And yet star identities, where the actor-signifier is foregrounded over the character-signifier, have persisted across franchise texts, industries and cultures. In the contemporary era,  stars like Harrison Ford and Jamie Lee Curtis stand as authenticating devices to anchor franchises, conveying ideas of legacy and nostalgia or as a means of negotiating digital aesthetics (see Knee and Fleming [2020] and Golding [2021]). The video game FIFA has integrated playable star ‘icons’ in its recent editions, like David Beckham and Dua Lipa. Hindi superstar Salman Khan stars in the popular Tiger franchise, while Shah Rukh Khan owns major stakes in international sports franchises. Historically, star-driven franchise properties include Bing Crosby and Bob Hope’s ‘Road to’ series, Peter Sellers and The Pink Panther series, and Tom Mix’s films, comics and radio shows. Cultural icons like Mexico’s El Santo, the UK’s Norman Wisdom or Carry On stars, and Hong Kong’s Kwan Tak-hing are all associated with a variety of franchised entertainment. These brief examples show the different relationships that can exist between star and property that the volume wishes to examine, each revealing how repetition, remediation and re-interpretation of stars through franchise properties work to extend a star’s economic and cultural value.

The proposed edited collection will be submitted to Edinburgh University Press (EUP) as part of the ‘International Film Stars’ series.  While the subject matter will undoubtedly attract scholars interested in exploring the increased dominance of franchise cinema as Hollywood’s primary mode of production, and this is something that we wholeheartedly encourage, we are also keen to hear from contributors interested in exploring franchises and stars that fall outside of the Anglo-American experience. If you would like to discuss your ideas, please feel free to get in touch.

Our collection seeks chapters that investigate the star-franchise intersection, including (but not limited to):

  • Case studies of specific stars or franchise properties.
  • Star-driven franchises.
  • Franchises where the franchise IP exceeds that of the star(s).
  • The paradoxical relationship between star identities and franchise texts where to support ongoing lives as multiplatform, historical entities, franchise properties often celebrate and dismiss the central star brands that exist within them.
  • The impact of star persona and character creation over time where franchises provide a sustained environment to construct performance, image and identity through core texts, branded marketing content and other multiplatform extensions.
  • Franchises in non-cinematic contexts
  • Ideological and cultural readings of franchise stardom and star image.
  • Absent or underdeveloped franchise stars and spaces, especially in terms of race, gender and sexuality
  • Research that engages with questions of media industries and labour, thinking about what it means for star performers to work in a franchise environment.
  • The impact of this on wider conceptions of star power and systemic entertainment infrastructures, economics, and legislations.
  • Franchise stardom as product differentiation and marking/branding strategy, including promotional personae.
  • The consideration of these (and other) issues within global, multimedia/multiplatform and historical contexts.
  • Research that explores to what degree the contemporary Hollywood moment reflects broader uses and cultures in industries around the world and through different decades of production and cultural history.

Please send abstracts of 300 to 500 words and a brief biographical note of 150 words to s.k.thomas@liverpool.ac.uk

  • Deadline for chapter proposals: 30 July 2022
  • Notification of acceptance: 31 August 2022
  • Full chapter submission: 31 June 2023

Further dates to be confirmed as the collection progresses.

Editor bios:

Sarah Thomas is Senior Lecturer in Communication and Media at the University of Liverpool. She researches screen performance and industrial approaches to stardom, with a current focus on digital and immersive media and franchise production. She is the author of the monographs Peter Lorre – Face Maker (Berghahn 2012) and James Mason (BFI Bloomsbury 2018), and co-editor of Cult Film Stardom (Palgrave 2013).

Mark McKenna is Associate Professor of Film and Media Industries at Staffordshire University. His research focuses on media marketing and distribution, censorship and regulation and global media industries. He is the author of Nasty Business: The Marketing and Branding of the Video Nasties (EUP 2020) and the forthcoming Snuff (Liverpool University Press), and co-editor of Horror Film Franchises (Routledge 2021).

References:

Fleming, David H. & Adam Knee. 2020. ‘The analogue strikes back: Star Wars, star authenticity, and cinematic anachronism’, Celebrity Studies 11:2: 205-220

Golding, Dan. 2021. ‘The memory of perfection: Digital faces and nostalgic franchise cinema’, Convergence, 27:4: 855–867

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International Conference ‘Touring Travel Writing II: Between Fact and Fiction’

deadline for submissions:

July 31, 2022

full name / name of organization:

CETAPS (Nova University)

contact email:

touringtravelwriting@gmail.com

As indicated by the number in its title, this conference is the second in a series focused on travel writing studies. The first one, which took place in 2019, celebrated the 300th anniversary of the publication of Robinson Crusoe (1719) and its literary legacy. This second edition will celebrate the 100th anniversary of James Joyce’s modernist novel Ulysses (1922), which chronicles the itinerary of Leopold Bloom in Dublin in the course of an ordinary day.

CETAPS (Centre for English, Translation and Anglo-Portuguese Studies, Universidade Nova, Lisbon) and CELIS (Centre de Recherches sur les Littératures et la Sociopoétique, Université Clermont Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand) once again join efforts and organise this international conference which aims to be a locus of debate on the many facets of travel writing, a research area that has emerged as a relevant topic of study in the Humanities and Social Sciences in the last few decades.

Date: September 8-9, 2022

Papers on the following topics are welcome:

Anglophone travel writingon the Portuguese-speaking world
Lusophone travel writing on the Anglophone World
Travelling to write
Travel writing, the novel, poetry and drama
Travel writing as report
Travel and visual culture
Travel writing, Humanitiesand the Social Sciences
Travelwriting, gender and power
Travel writing, (post)colonial discourse and decoloniality
Travel writing and (forced) migration
Travel writing, imagined communities and imagology
Travel writing and tourist culture
Travelwriting and (in)tangible heritage
Travelwriting and exploration
Travelling as gentrification
Travel writing, censorship and surveillance
Travel writing and (auto)biography

Travel writing and Otherness
Travelwriting, politics and ideology
Travel writing and ethics
Travel writing, mobility and conviviality
Mapsas travel narratives
Travel,Fantasy, Children’s Literature and Young Adult Fiction
Sound/Food/Smell/Touch/Visual/Ecoscapes in Travel Writing
Travel writing in/as translation
Utopian and dystopian travel narratives
Science and travel writing
History of Travel Writing
Travel writing: theory and criticism
Intertextuality in travel writing
The rhetorics of travel writing
Teaching Travel Writing

Keynote speakers:
Carl Thompson (University of Surrey, UK)
Maria de Fátima Outeirinho (Faculdade de Letras, Universidade do Porto)

Papers and pre-organized panels:
The conference languages are English, Spanish and Portuguese. Speakers should prepare for a 20-minute presentation. Please send a 300-word abstract, as well as a short biographical note (100 words), by July 31st, to:

touringtravelwriting@gmail.com

Proposals for papers and pre-organized panels (in this case, please also include a brief description of the panel) should include full title of the paper, name, institutional affiliation, contact details, a short bionote and AV requirements (if any).

Notification of abstract acceptance or rejection will take place by August 5, 2022.

Registration fees:
•Full fee: 80Euros
• Students: 40 Euros (ID required)

Payment must be made until August 20, 2022. After this date proposals will no longer be considered.

For further queries please contact:
cetaps@fcsh.unl.pt
or
touringtravelwriting@gmail.com
or
mzc@fcsh.unl.pt

Delegates are responsible for their own travel arrangements and accommodation.The conference website will soon provide useful information.

Payment:
Payment by bank transfer
Payment by Pay Pal
Reference: CETAPS CONGRESSOS–610245

BIC:TOTAPTPL

IBAN: PT500018 000321419114020 13

Tax identification number: 501559094

This is additional data your bank may require:
Account Owner: FCSHUNL-Research Units
Bank: BANCO SANTANDERTOTTA S.A.

For PayPal payments, use the email: dgfc@fcsh.unl.pt
Identify your payment referring to:
CETAPS 610245 International Conference (TouringTravel WritingII).
Please add PayPal international taxes:
PT +EURO zone: 3,4% + 0,35€
Rest of the World: 4,90% + 0,35€
Full Fee: 83,07€ (PT & EURO zone)
83,92€ (Rest of the World)
Student Fee: 41,71€ (PT & EUROzone)
42,31€ (Rest of the World)
Please send a copy of your confirmed payment to: cetaps@fcsh.unl.pt

Event website:http://www.touringtravelwriting.wordpress.com

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Deadline for Submissions: July 31, 2022

Communist Biographies – New perspectives, sources and discussions

A Special Issue of Securitas Imperii: Journal for the Study of Modern Dictatorships

More than thirty years ago, the possibility of research on the history of the communist movement and regime opened up in Czechoslovakia as well in other former state-socialist countries. The few attempts to produce scholarly biographies of politicians and other personalities associated with communist ideology and practice stood somewhat apart from the multitude of topics, research areas, and methodological approaches. Rather, the period demand for “filling in the blanks” prompted the rapid publication of the “secrets” hidden in the archives on partial issues and cases. Biography, as a method attempting a comprehensive and at the same time essentially individualized treatment of a person’s life set in a broad political and social context, required long-term research, that was often at odds with the priorities of research institution and grant agencies. In the Czech milieu, moreover, priority was given to learning about the lives and fates of democratic and non-communist personalities who belonged among those famous “blanks”. However, the few biographies, which began to be published ten or more years after the political change of 1989, showed the exceptional potential of the biographical method in the study of communism as a fundamental phenomenon in the history of the 20th century. By taking the lives of individuals, whether political leaders or cultural and artistic figures, as examples, it was possible to address the deep internal contradictions and ambivalences that communism contained.

The aim of the thematic issue is to provide a space for the discussion of the results achieved so far in the field of biography within the study of communism, both in the Czech and international context. It also aims to contribute to the debate on methodological problems and the future direction of this genre. In order to comprehensively understand the phenomenon of communism as an internationalist movement making a universalist claim, it is necessary to link different research contexts. We would be pleased if the forthcoming issue contributes to this goal.

Editors welcome contributions from different fields of research: history, political science, cultural studies, philosophy, sociology, gender studies or any other related areas of interest.

Topics may address (but are not limited to) the following aspects:

Biography as a method and genre of the history of communism

We welcome studies focusing on different aspects of the methodology of historical biographies, taking into account the context for the study of the communist movement in the national and international context. These aspects are in particular:

  • implications of biographies for the study of the history of the communist movement and governance, including transnational perspective
  • the limits and challenges of working with archival fonds and other types of sources such as personal papers, published diaries and memoirs or interviews
  • trends, innovations and new impulses in the writing of historical biographies
  • comparison of experiences and achievements in the field of biography in different national settings
  • the development of professional and social demand for specialised biographies of communist figures in various countries of the former Western and Eastern worlds

Biographical studies focusing on various aspects of communism

We welcome biographical studies focusing on various aspects of belonging to the communist movement and identification with the communist ideology and its goals. These aspects are in particular:

  • background, family and social origin
  • biographies of the main personalities of the communist movement over time – their influence on the co-creation of personal history and the connection with the development of the movement
  • shared identities and the relationship between them: nation, class, education, gender
  • national, regional and local specifics in a universally defined movement; international experience of activity in the structures of the international communist movement
  • motivation and context of involvement in the movement – the relationship between idealism and pragmatism, attitude to power and its use, the question of loyalty, conformity and party discipline and its limits
  • devotion and willingness to self-sacrifice – experience of illegality, imprisonment and other forms of repression by anti-communist power
  • experience of exile – political activity and living conditions of emigrants
  • cases of apostasy, condemnation and party dissent – the experience of the victims of purges and repressions under Stalinism and further

We welcome both the elaboration of episodes and the evaluation of the overall life course for biographies of party leaders and top officials and communist intellectuals, artists and scientists, and ordinary rank-and-file.

Studies using collective biography and comparative biography methods are also welcome. Contact Info:

Adéla Rádková, Ph.D.

Editor-in-chief

Securitas Imperii: Journal for the Study of Modern Dictatorships

Institute for the Study of Totalitarian Regimes

Czech Republic Contact Email:  securitas.imperii@ustrcr.cz URL:  https://securitas-imperii-journal.com/news/?lang=en

Themed Journal Issue on “Narrative and Identity”

The Australasian Journal of Popular Culture

deadline for submissions:

July 10, 2022

lorna.piatti-farnell@aut.ac.nz

The call for papers for the next issue of the Australasian Journal of Popular Culture (Issue 11.1-2), on the general theme of ‘narrative and identity’, is now open.

Article submissions on any aspect of the theme are encouraged. The Issue’s Editors particulalry invite articles on the following topics:

– self-representation on social media
– representations of disability and neurodiversity in popular culture
– re-inventions of genre and viewership/readership in popular culture
– alternative realities and modes of storytelling in (video) games
– online fandoms and identity
– popular icons

The deadline for submissions of full articles (5-6k words) is 10 July 2022. The Journal is indexed in SCOPUS (among others), and its remit is broad and international. Further information about the Journal can be found here: https://www.intellectbooks.com/the-australasian-journal-of-popular-culture

Please submit your articles for consideration (together with a short bio and insitutional affiliation) to both editors: Professor Lorna Piatti-Farnell (lorna.piatti-farnell@aut.ac.nz) and Dr Ashleigh Prosser (ashleigh.prosser@uwa.edu.au).

The Issue will be published (both in print and electronically) in December 2022.

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Deadline for Submissions July 15, 2022

Call for Papers for proposed panel for South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA) 2022

November 11-13, 2022 in Jacksonville, FL

Autobiography: Changes in Form and Meaning

This interdisciplinary panel welcomes submissions on any aspect of change within life writing. With the proliferation of modes available for what Anna Poletti has termed “self-life-inscription,” and a concurrent rise in hybrid genres such as autofiction that challenge the assumed boundary between truth and fiction in autobiographical narrative, it is clear that the scope of what is considered autobiography is changing. This panel seeks to articulate these changes and explore how they are impacting our understanding of the meaning and significance of life writing. Papers might explore changes in the medium of autobiography, such as social media, photography, film, graphic narratives, material collections, or performance. Papers might also address changes within established forms such as confession, memoir, the personal essay, or the diary. Theoretical considerations of change, transformation, or conversion within autobiography would also be welcome. By July 15th, please submit an abstract of 250 words, a brief bio, and any A/V or scheduling requests to Kimberly Hall, Wofford College, at hallka@wofford.edu

The SAMLA Conference will be held at the Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront. For additional conference information, please see the SAMLA website: https://samla.memberclicks.net.

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CFP: Out of Confinement: Creativity in Constraint

Women in French Studies Special Issue (2024)

July 15, 2022

contact email:

youna_kwak@redlands.edu

We invite article submissions for a special topics issue of Women in French Studies (2024) to explore work created by confined women and work that represents confined women, from the early modern period to the present-day. The special issue will explore how the confinement of women as depicted in fictional and non-fictional texts (in any media) informs, reflects and interrogates gendered conditions of existence. How have confined women been represented in literature, film and art? What kind of thinking or writing is produced by women out of conditions of confinement? What are the impacts of confinement on creative production? How does physical confinement change how we consume texts?

In March 2020, the word confinement suddenly became an unwelcome part of our everyday lexicon, as lockdown, quarantine, and stay-at-home orders were issued worldwide to curb the spread of the coronavirus pandemic. Within the household, mandatory confinement exacerbated women’s perennially uneven obligation to engage in invisible labor—whether middle-class women working from home, or working-class women compelled to risk their health so that others could abide by the imperative to stay in. Both within and outside the home, women were disproportionately tasked with “essential,” racialized and gendered, structurally invisible forms of labor, including childcare, cleaning, healthcare, food preparation, and eldercare.

Since the early modern period, accounts of women’s experiences in voluntary or forced confinement have been richly explored in works by French-language writers as diverse as Marie de France, Marguerite de Navarre, Assia Djebar, and Marie Darrieussecq, to name a few. On the one hand, representations of confinement can confirm that gender disparities are exacerbated when burdens are unequally shouldered by women during periods of confinement. On the other hand, representations of cloister or retreat that express the fantasy of liberatory or self-actualizing confinement, in explicitly repudiating familial or social obligations, can unsettle the caregiving roles traditionally assigned to women, as spouses, mothers, or daughters.

We invite proposals from all historic periods, genres, and geographic regions.

Suggested topics

  • cloisters, convents
  • imprisonment, incarceration
  • internment
  • segregated confinement (solitary confinement))/home confinement (house arrest)
  • stay-at-home mothers (domestic confinement)
  • the “hold” and conditions of enslavement
  • COVID-19 “Stay-at-home” orders
  • sanatoriums/illness/disease
  • childbirth/bedrest
  • anchorites and anchoresses
  • hostage situations/kidnapping
  • asylums
  • disability, design and space
  • bourgeois refuge, rural life, the “country house”
  • artist studio, artist space, residency, retreat

Abstracts of 250-300 words, in French or in English should be sent to Youna Kwak (youna_kwak@redlands.edu) and Anne Brancky (anbrancky@vassar.edu) by July 15, 2022. Notification of acceptance will be made by September 1, 2022, with final drafts of selected articles due April 2023. Articles will be subject to peer review. Authors must be current members of Women in French at the time of publication.

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Call for Papers

Women and Hollywood: Tales of Inequality, Abuse and Resistance in the Dream Factory

Edited by Karen McNally

Abstract Deadline: Friday 15 July 2022

Responses to the Amber Heard/Johnny Depp defamation trial prompt numerous questions about the reception of Hollywood movie stardom as legal cases of abuse play out in the combined ages of television and social media. Moreover, the layered gender dynamics can be contextualized within a contemporary framework of exposure and resistance that includes the imprisonment of Harvey Weinstein on rape and sexual assault charges, and the pay inequalities publicized by actresses including Michelle Williams and Octavia Spencer. Amplified by the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements, as well as by organizations and initiatives such as the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media and Black Women’s Equal Pay Day, issues of inequality and various forms of abuse have become central to our understanding of the female experience of contemporary Hollywood.

Yet these narratives are far from revelatory, hidden or limited to a contemporary context. The power imbalances and mistreatment that have partly defined women’s careers in the American film industry are as long-established as they are persistent, built into the structure of Hollywood and stretching across its entire history. From the euphemistically- termed ‘casting couch’ to the control of stars’ reproductive choices, and from the indirect expulsion of female directors (O’Hara, 2021), to male ownership of women’s work (McLean, 2022) and the multiple limitations placed upon women of colour, the professional experience in Hollywood for women has consistently been different from that of their male colleagues. These inequalities have at the same time been both enacted and challenged in plain sight. Backstudio pictures (Cohan, 2019) and stardom films (McNally, 2021) disturb their promotion of Hollywood mythology with characters who negotiate their professional lives around these gendered obstacles; historical films and TV dramas revisit and revise these myths with alternative histories; and biopics, documentaries, press articles, television interviews, biographies, autobiographies and social media become sites of disclosure, resistance and activism. These storied spaces convey the extent to which abuse and inequality has become an historically pervasive and recognized aspect of women’s experience in the film industry and of the structural fabric of Hollywood.

This volume seeks a range of original essays that explore film, television and other media narratives depicting inequality and abuse as part of women’s professional and personal lives in Hollywood. The book aims to address both fictional and non-fictional narratives and to explore historical and contemporary case studies.

Areas of interest might include but are not limited to:

  • Conflict between Hollywood mythology and exposure of female experience in backstudio pictures and stardom films
  • Narratives of stars and other actors, directors, screenwriters, producers, costume designers
  • Implicit and explicit exposure in scandal magazines
  • The use of autobiography by female stars to construct alternative narratives
  • Screen narratives of Hollywood as activism
  • Documentary and alternative histories of Hollywood
  • Intersectional inequality in the experiences of women of colour
  • The male saviour and a patriarchal system
  • Sexual abuse as professional control
  • Depictions of the impact of ageism on women’s careers
  • Fact and fiction boundary crossing in the biopic
  • Specific eras of inequality for women in Hollywood
  • Narratives of individual and/or collective challenges to inequality
  • Press narratives of abuse cases
  • The impact of social media on narratives of inequality and abuse
  • Narratives of disappearance from the screen due to inequality or abuse
  • Exposing vs normalizing inequality and/or abuse through its depiction
  • Studio controls over relationships and reproductive choices
  • Hollywood narratives framed through historical context
  • The careless mistreatment of women’s bodies in narratives of Hollywood
  • Hollywood’s emotionally abusive relationship with women
  • The impact of women writers, directors and producers on the exposure of inequality and narratives of resistance

Chapter proposals should be submitted as a 300-400 word abstract to the editor, Dr Karen McNally, at womenandhollywoodbook@gmail.com by Friday 15 July 2022. Please include an author biography of 100-150 words. Final chapters will be 6,000 to 7,000 words and due by Friday 16 December 2022. Please feel free to email with any queries prior to submission of abstracts. A leading publisher is being approached for publication.

Works Cited:

Steven Cohan, Hollywood by Hollywood: The Backstudio Picture and the Mystique of Making Movies (Oxford: OUP, 2019)

Adrienne L. McLean, All for Beauty: Makeup and Hairdressing in Hollywood’s Studio Era (New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 2022)

Karen McNally, The Stardom Film (New York: Wallflower-Columbia University Press, 2021)

Helen O’Hara, Women vs Hollywood: The Fall and Rise of Women in Film (London: Little, Brown Book Group, 2021)

—————————————————————

Dr Karen McNally

Reader in American Film, Television and Cultural History

London Metropolitan University

Recent Publications:

American Television during a Television Presidency (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2022)

https://www.wsupress.wayne.edu/books/detail/american-television-during-television-presidency

The Stardom Film (New York: Wallflower-Columbia University Press, 2021)

http://cup.columbia.edu/book/the-stardom-film/9780231184014

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Life Narratives: Self-referential Proclamations

Journal of American Studies of Turkey (JAST): Special Issue on Life Narratives

Guest edited by Bilge Mutluay Çetintaş, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey

Deadline for Full-Text Submissions: July 15, 2022

American life writing has a long tradition starting with the diaries, journals, and captivity narratives kept by Pilgrims and Puritans such as Mary Rowlandson’s The Sovereignty and Goodness of God: Being a Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682), to more canonized life writings such as Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography (1791).

In their seminal book Reading Autobiography  (2010), Sidonie Smith and Julia Watson point out that “autobiography” refers to the traditional western mode of life writing that emerged during the Enlightenment in the late eighteenth century. Unfairly discrediting other life narrating forms, autobiography refers to the traditional representative self-writing of sovereign individuals. Thus, Smith and Watson prefer “life writing” or “life narratives” as an all inclusive umbrella term instead of “autobiography,” or the more flexible term “memoir.”

For postmodern and postcolonial critics, the “I” in self-representation is far from the coherent and unified essentialist individual of autobiographies. The self is a fragmented entity, created through the limitations of language and positioned in multiple discourses. In Autobiography and Postmodernism (1994), Leigh Gilmore observes the relationship between truth telling and agency as the core of all autobiographical narrations, complicated further by ideology, gender, identity, and authority. She views autobiographical acts as rooted in conventions and power relations by evoking Foucault’s conception of power, stating that self-referential narratives create “a cultural and discursive site of truth production in relation to the disciplinary boundary of punishment” (59).

In whatever form they may appear, life narratives are part of our lives in an increasing and overwhelming amount. The recent global (semi)forced pandemic lockdowns have  augmented the sharing and observing of daily life. Trying out recipes, body training, playing instruments, singing, or demonstrating various hobbies on web-based platforms have become statements of existence or acts of self-assertion. In response to destabilized and unsafe public spheres, domestic enclosures have transformed into permanent sites of renewed interest in autobiographical acts.

With this renewed “autobiographical turn” in mind, the guest editor of this issue of JAST seeks original, previously unpublished manuscripts on American life narratives, dealing with any period or subject. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Politics and poetics of American life writing
  • Critical studies on American life narratives
  • The limits, challenges, and possibilities of self-referential portrayals
  • The role of memory, agency, and authority in life narratives
  • Life writing in American poetry, novels or theater (fictionalized lives)
  • Life narratives in performance and the visual arts (autobiographical videos, street performance, photography, exhibitions, etc.)
  • Life narratives in TV series, movies, web-based channels, etc.
  • Online lives (digital life stories, social media, dating apps, etc.)
  • Genres of American life writing (apology, autofiction, autothanatography, biomythography, captivity narrative, diary, eco(auto)biography, gastrography, jockography, journal, letters, memoir, periautography, prison narratives, scriptotheraphy, slave narratives, spiritual narratives, travel narratives, witness narratives etc.)
  • Popular culture and life writing
  • American women’s life writing
  • Immigrant and ethnic life narratives
  • Family life-writing or collaborative life writing
  • Public figures and celebrity life writing
  • Graphic life narratives (autographics)
  • Life writing and consciousness raising
  • Activism and life writing
  • Hybridity, diaspora, and (forced) displacement in life narratives
  • Dis/ability and life writing
  • The global pandemic and life narratives
  • Teaching life narratives

Full-text manuscripts of between 6,000 and 8,000 words in MLA style (with parenthetical internal citations, a Works Cited page, minimal footnotes, and in Times New Roman 12-point font), should be emailed as Microsoft Word attachments to Bilge Mutluay Çetintaş (bilge.mutluay@gmail.com) by July 15, 2022. Please include an abstract (150 words), keywords, and a one-paragraph bio (150 words, written in the third-person) with all manuscripts. Topic inquiries are welcome prior to full-text submission.

Contact Info:

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Bilge Mutluay Çetintaş, Guest Editor

Contact Info:

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Bilge Mutluay Çetintaş

Contact Email:

bilge.mutluay@gmail.com

URL:

http://www.asat-jast.org/index.php/jast/call-for-papers

Themed Journal Issue on “Narrative and Identity”

The Australasian Journal of Popular Culture

deadline for submissions:

July 10, 2022

lorna.piatti-farnell@aut.ac.nz

The call for papers for the next issue of the Australasian Journal of Popular Culture (Issue 11.1-2), on the general theme of ‘narrative and identity’, is now open.

Article submissions on any aspect of the theme are encouraged. The Issue’s Editors particulalry invite articles on the following topics:

– self-representation on social media
– representations of disability and neurodiversity in popular culture
– re-inventions of genre and viewership/readership in popular culture
– alternative realities and modes of storytelling in (video) games
– online fandoms and identity
– popular icons

The deadline for submissions of full articles (5-6k words) is 10 July 2022. The Journal is indexed in SCOPUS (among others), and its remit is broad and international. Further information about the Journal can be found here: https://www.intellectbooks.com/the-australasian-journal-of-popular-culture

Please submit your articles for consideration (together with a short bio and insitutional affiliation) to both editors: Professor Lorna Piatti-Farnell (lorna.piatti-farnell@aut.ac.nz) and Dr Ashleigh Prosser (ashleigh.prosser@uwa.edu.au).

The Issue will be published (both in print and electronically) in December 2022.

Tasavvur Collective’s 2022 Symposium – ‘Writing Muslim Women in South Asia’

deadline for submissions: 

July 1, 2022

Symposium, 5-6 August, 2022

Tasavvur Collective, Universities of Edinburgh, St. Andrews and Exeter

contact email:

Tasavvurcollective@gmail.com

Symposium Concept Note and Call for Papers

From the Aurat March in Pakistan to the Shaheen Bagh protests in India, Muslim women have been at the forefront of political change and social upheaval, both in recent years and in the past. With Bangladeshi lawyer Sara Hossain as the recipient of the International Women of Courage Award in 2016 for reforming legislation on violence against women and Arooj Aftab as the first Pakistani woman to win a Grammy in 2022, these achievements are also not limited to any single sphere of cultural influence. And yet, the dominant narrative surrounding the experiences of Muslim women continues to focus on the oppressions they have faced, with little to no consideration given to the way they have overcome these challenges. As such, the category of ‘Muslim Woman’ has been essentialised in ethonographic, Orientalist and neo-liberal discourses since it began to be ‘studied’, a narrative that scholars and activists alike are seeking to challenge more and more every day.

This essentialist discourse was recently highlighted across South Asia, thus proving the necessity of challenging such narratives. On March 15th 2022, the Karnataka High Court in India upheld a government order to deny entry to Muslim women who wear the hijab into educational institutions by ruling that the “hijab is not essential to Islam”. Two separate incidents of auctioning Muslim women online for ‘deals’ were reported within 8 months of each other between 2021-22 and the perpetrators of both were let off by the Delhi High Court on “humanitarian grounds”. In Sri Lanka, a similar anti-Muslim sentiment has been reverberating through the appeals of Buddhist monk group Bodu Bala Sena (BSS) to ban the burqa as a “sign of religious extremism”. Across the border in Pakistan, the Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam-Fazl (JUI-F) organised a ‘Hijab March’ in solidarity with the Muslim women in Karnataka in February 2022. Rather than focusing on freedom of choice, party leaders used the opportunity to take a stance against the Aurat March, an annual demonstration for women’s rights held across Pakistan on 8th March to coincide with International Women’s Day. Aurat March was, and is, constantly accused of violating haya (modesty), with particular reference made to“objectionable slogans” such as #MeraJismMeriMarzi.

There is a long and often neglected history of Muslim women intervening in debates about ‘reform’, decolonisation and citizenship to assert their own interests and identities, pioneering the rise of feminist scholarship and activism in South Asia. From Begum Rokeya Sakhawat Hosain to Kamila Shamsie, one can trace a history of Muslim women writers and thinkers who have fundamentally altered contemporary literary and political discourse. A careful examination of these narratives surrounding Muslim women’s intellectual and political existence validates the significant work of scholars like Shenila Khoja-Moolji and Yasmin Saikia, who have argued that attempts to emancipate Muslim women have had to contend with simultaneously imposing uniform, majoritarian models of femininity– whether it is colonial modernity or orthodox religiosity. Navigating these binaries of emancipation and oppression, Muslim women have carved their own identities to interrogate and subvert these categorisations. This symposium is an attempt to bring together scholars, thinkers, artists and activists to create such a discursive space for a timely conversation on Muslim women’s pasts and present.

Each of our panels foregrounds the agential capacity of Muslim women in writing themselves and others, as they contend with shifting dynamics of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and caste, within and with relation to South Asia. This symposium hopes to disrupt the essentializing discourse on Muslim women’s identity by exploring the polyphonic nature of human subjectivities.
Discussion topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Narratives of gender, sexuality and queerness Agency and artistic expression in Muslim women
  • Protest, resistance, and activism
  • Nationalism, nation and gender; Partition(s) Space, place and temporality
  • Purdah, privacy and public discourse
  • Marriage, family, and domesticity
  • Technology; social media; cybercrime
  • Sair: narratives of travel, cosmopolitanism and mobility
  • ‘Modern’ Muslim women; self-fashioning in the age of empire
  • Sharif Ladki: reform, education and girlhood
  • Zaat: intersections of caste and gender in South Asian Islam
  • Begumati Zubaan: gender and multilingualism

We invite established academics and early-career/PhD scholars within the fields of humanities and social sciences, and outside of these realms, as well as non-academic voices working on and representing Muslim women’s perspectives with reference to South Asia to present 20-minute papers, mixed-media presentations or any other forms of discussion on or around the above themes. Please send 300 word abstracts/presentation outlines including a short biography of not more than 100 words to tasavvurcollective@gmail.com. The deadline for submission of abstracts is 1st July 2022, and selected participants will be contacted with the final schedule by 15th July 2022. The symposium will be held online via Zoom on 5th-6th August 2022.

Symposium organisers: Fatima Z. Naveed (University of Exeter), Sheelalipi Sahana (University of Edinburgh) and
Zehra Kazmi (University of St. Andrews) of the Tasavvur Collective. Follow us on Twitter: @tasavvurcollect for updates.

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On (Re)Shaping Identity: Self-Portraiture and the Quotidian

PAMLA 2022 – Los Angeles, CA (November 11-13, 2022 – entirely in-person

deadline for submissions: 

July 1, 2022

Please contact presiding officer for this session, Ariana Lyriotakis, with any questions: lyriotaa@tcd.ie

Special Session – CFP

Persona and confessional poetry of the Postmodern period enact an undeniable relationship with the quotidian. But how do these poems explore a visual depiction and an expression of self-identity in ordinary life? This panel will explore the methods by which poets manipulate and reject aesthetic production in their poetry, while calling into question subjectivity and truthful composition.

This special session will explore poetic self-portraiture and the shaping of identity within the bounds of the quotidian. John Ashbery’s “Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror” is perhaps one of the more notable examples from this era; as a poetry firmly situated within the intermediality of poetic textual images and art, he addresses “the enchant of self with self” through personal depiction and aesthetic production. But what is revealed to the reader in these moments of vulnerability and self-appraisal? How can the poet be both subject and object, while constructing a poetic likeness amongst the commonplace? This panel seeks poetry of self-encounter, whether banal or familiar, to interrogate an inward/outward representation of the self within these constructs.

Contributions are invited relating to any of the following aspects, as well as broader interpretations of the theme which may illuminate and elucidate in greater detail. Please be in touch if you have any questions or require further clarification.

  • Depictions of the domestic and the visual
  • Intermediality of poetic textual images and art
  • Interrogations of the actual and the self
  • Orality and performance in poetry
  • Visuality of text and experimentation
  • Mimesis and the composition of ordinary spaces
  • Interdeterminacy and temporality

Abstracts must be submitted through the PAMLA website only.

The web address for this session’s CFP is: https://pamla.ballastacademic.com/Home/S/18564

All panel participants/presenters must join PAMLA by July 1, 2022.

https://pamla.ballastacademic.com

CALL FOR PAPERS: 

LIFE WRITING AS WORLD LITERATURE (book)

Deadline for abstracts: July 1, 2022

Deadline for final essays: January 1, 2023

The series Literatures as World Literature by Bloomsbury Publishing aims to “take a novel approach to world literature by analyzing specific constellations — according to language, nation, form, or theme — of literary texts and authors in their own world-literary dimensions.” https://www.bloomsbury.com/us/series/literatures-as-world-literature/

The proposed volume will be dedicated to life writing. We use “life writing” as a broad term encompassing a wide variety of personal narratives. We also recognize the capaciousness of the term “world literature” and the accompanying challenges. By putting life writing and world literature into dialogue, we seek to explore their rich shared history, as well as new areas of research.

Authors are encouraged to explore, among others
the intersecting histories of the two fields
debates in world literature concerning auto/biographical genres
autobiographical texts outside the Western canons (East Asia, Latin America, Northern Africa, Middle East)
autobiographical works as they move in translation through global contexts
autobiographical works as they move across time and media (remediation, intermediality, etc.)
the role of materiality in life writing
visual narratives, new media, affective networks, and the role of life writing in participatory democracy
autobiographical texts in “world literature” courses and in cultural diplomacy
the role of autobiographical texts in eco or medical humanities
the homogenizing effects of autobiographical technology and data bias

Please submit abstracts of 350 words, along with a short bio, to the Editors: Helga Lenart-Cheng (hl4@stmarys-ca.edu) and Ioana Luca (ioana.luca@ntnu.edu.tw) by July 1, 2022.

Helga Lenart-Cheng
Associate Professor
World Languages and Cultures
Honors Program, Director
Saint Mary’s College of California
Book office hours here
Forthcoming in 2022: Story Revolutions: Collective Narratives from the Enlightenment to the Digital Age

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Tasavvur Collective’s 2022 Symposium – ‘Writing Muslim Women in South Asia’

deadline for submissions: 

July 1, 2022

Tasavvur Collective, Universities of Edinburgh, St. Andrews and Exeter

contact email:

Tasavvurcollective@gmail.com

Symposium Concept Note and Call for Papers

From the Aurat March in Pakistan to the Shaheen Bagh protests in India, Muslim women have been at the forefront of political change and social upheaval, both in recent years and in the past. With Bangladeshi lawyer Sara Hossain as the recipient of the International Women of Courage Award in 2016 for reforming legislation on violence against women and Arooj Aftab as the first Pakistani woman to win a Grammy in 2022, these achievements are also not limited to any single sphere of cultural influence. And yet, the dominant narrative surrounding the experiences of Muslim women continues to focus on the oppressions they have faced, with little to no consideration given to the way they have overcome these challenges. As such, the category of ‘Muslim Woman’ has been essentialised in ethonographic, Orientalist and neo-liberal discourses since it began to be ‘studied’, a narrative that scholars and activists alike are seeking to challenge more and more every day.

This essentialist discourse was recently highlighted across South Asia, thus proving the necessity of challenging such narratives. On March 15th 2022, the Karnataka High Court in India upheld a government order to deny entry to Muslim women who wear the hijab into educational institutions by ruling that the “hijab is not essential to Islam”. Two separate incidents of auctioning Muslim women online for ‘deals’ were reported within 8 months of each other between 2021-22 and the perpetrators of both were let off by the Delhi High Court on “humanitarian grounds”. In Sri Lanka, a similar anti-Muslim sentiment has been reverberating through the appeals of Buddhist monk group Bodu Bala Sena (BSS) to ban the burqa as a “sign of religious extremism”. Across the border in Pakistan, the Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam-Fazl (JUI-F) organised a ‘Hijab March’ in solidarity with the Muslim women in Karnataka in February 2022. Rather than focusing on freedom of choice, party leaders used the opportunity to take a stance against the Aurat March, an annual demonstration for women’s rights held across Pakistan on 8th March to coincide with International Women’s Day. Aurat March was, and is, constantly accused of violating haya (modesty), with particular reference made to“objectionable slogans” such as #MeraJismMeriMarzi.

There is a long and often neglected history of Muslim women intervening in debates about ‘reform’, decolonisation and citizenship to assert their own interests and identities, pioneering the rise of feminist scholarship and activism in South Asia. From Begum Rokeya Sakhawat Hosain to Kamila Shamsie, one can trace a history of Muslim women writers and thinkers who have fundamentally altered contemporary literary and political discourse. A careful examination of these narratives surrounding Muslim women’s intellectual and political existence validates the significant work of scholars like Shenila Khoja-Moolji and Yasmin Saikia, who have argued that attempts to emancipate Muslim women have had to contend with simultaneously imposing uniform, majoritarian models of femininity– whether it is colonial modernity or orthodox religiosity. Navigating these binaries of emancipation and oppression, Muslim women have carved their own identities to interrogate and subvert these categorisations. This symposium is an attempt to bring together scholars, thinkers, artists and activists to create such a discursive space for a timely conversation on Muslim women’s pasts and present.

Each of our panels foregrounds the agential capacity of Muslim women in writing themselves and others, as they contend with shifting dynamics of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and caste, within and with relation to South Asia. This symposium hopes to disrupt the essentializing discourse on Muslim women’s identity by exploring the polyphonic nature of human subjectivities.
Discussion topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Narratives of gender, sexuality and queerness Agency and artistic expression in Muslim women
  • Protest, resistance, and activism
  • Nationalism, nation and gender; Partition(s) Space, place and temporality
  • Purdah, privacy and public discourse
  • Marriage, family, and domesticity
  • Technology; social media; cybercrime
  • Sair: narratives of travel, cosmopolitanism and mobility
  • ‘Modern’ Muslim women; self-fashioning in the age of empire
  • Sharif Ladki: reform, education and girlhood
  • Zaat: intersections of caste and gender in South Asian Islam
  • Begumati Zubaan: gender and multilingualism

We invite established academics and early-career/PhD scholars within the fields of humanities and social sciences, and outside of these realms, as well as non-academic voices working on and representing Muslim women’s perspectives with reference to South Asia to present 20-minute papers, mixed-media presentations or any other forms of discussion on or around the above themes. Please send 300 word abstracts/presentation outlines including a short biography of not more than 100 words to tasavvurcollective@gmail.com. The deadline for submission of abstracts is 1st July 2022, and selected participants will be contacted with the final schedule by 15th July 2022. The symposium will be held online via Zoom on 5th-6th August 2022.

Symposium organisers: Fatima Z. Naveed (University of Exeter), Sheelalipi Sahana (University of Edinburgh) and
Zehra Kazmi (University of St. Andrews) of the Tasavvur Collective. Follow us on Twitter: @tasavvurcollect for updates.

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Deadline for Submissions: July 1, 2022

Reimagining #MeToo in South Asia And the Diaspora (Edited Collection of Essays)

Dr. Nidhi Shrivastava

contact email:

shrivastavan@sacredheart.edu

This edited volume seeks to examine how sexual violence and feminist interventions in South Asia and the Diaspora have been articulated in the context of but, more importantly, in opposition to the #MeToo Movement. We seek to understand how the feminist movement has radically diverged from the assimilationist discourse of the #MeToo Movement and, consequently, the Global North. The #MeToo movement has not made an impact at the grassroots level because it is hinged on the victim-survivor to speak up. In an era where the Global North has been a model for influencing change in the Global South, there has been an inconspicuous absence of recognition and impact of the #MeToo Movement. In addition, survivors’ testimonies lie at the center of the #MeToo movement, which demystifies victim-shaming and victim-blaming, legitimizing the survivor’s testimony as the unquestionable truth.

Since 2017, the #MeToo movement has been successful in the conviction of Harvey Weinstein, who was at the center of the landmark trial. The #MeToo has had a significant impact worldwide on how we understand sexual harassment, rape, and gendered violence, especially in the US. However, this global women’s movement has had little reach in South Asia, where access to virtual platforms is limited, and hashtags are still unknown. The #MeToo Movement in South Asia and the Diaspora was taken up briefly by the media and entertainment industry but has failed to make a concrete impact in many ways. This can be attributed to multiple reasons – there are several regionally specific movements, such as the 2009 Pink Chaddi Campaign and 2011 #WhyLoiter campaign, that have been radically popular within the sub-continent.

In the South Asian context, such testimonies are still taboo, which leads to survivors refusing to share and relive their experiences/narratives even if they have the means and access. Therefore, our edited volume seeks to problematize the #MeToo movement in order to reimagine and contextualize it in South Asia and the South Asian diaspora as a much-needed intervention to examine the implications of a transnational feminist movement. We wish to explore questions such as: how the #MeToo movement can move away from Hollywood/Bollywood/workplace and elitist exclusivity. How can it be more inclusive of non-white and marginalized voices?

In light of the ongoing and increasing gender-based violence occurring in South Asia and the diaspora, our edited volume will reflect on these questions as we seek to understand new ways of formulating complex and nuanced gendered subjectivities vis-à-vis the lens of post-colonial feminism and intersectionality. Our focus shifts away from the traditional approaches of victimization to generate dialogue and hopefully create a new platform to break the silence and encourage discomforting narratives to normalize conversations surrounding this pivotal issue.

Themes include but are not limited to the following:

  • Pedagogy and Transformative Learning via #MeToo in the Classroom
  • Queer/LGBTQI+ Spaces within #MeToo
  • New Masculinities
  • Contemporary Gender Movements and Resistances
  • Caste, Gender, Class, and Social Spaces
  • Problematization of #MeToo and ‘Speaking Up’
  • New Modalities of Testimonies
  • Resistance and Digital Feminist Interventions
  • New Feminist Mediations
  • Militarized Feminist Modernities
  • Ageism
  • Viral Videos
  • Censorship, Cultural Production, and Minority Literature
  • Mythologies, Legends, and Sexuality

We welcome informal queries, and potential contributors may submit a 500-750 word abstract and 2 page CV by July 1, 2022. Please direct queries to Dr Nidhi Shrivastava (Sacred Heart University), shrivastavan@sacredheart.edu, Dr Ruma Sinha (Syracuse University), rumas1@gmail.com, and Dr Billie T. Guarino (Jamia Milia Islamia), thoidingjam@gmail.com. Acceptance of the final articles is subject to double-blind peer review. The final deadline for submitting 5,000- 6,000-word articles will be November 15, 2022.

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Deadline for Submissions June 30, 2022

Representations of Border Crossings in Media, Literature, and the Arts

International Academic Conference:15-16 December 2022

MIDEX Centre, University of Central Lancashire

(Research Strand: Representations of Migration, Diaspora and Exile in Media, Literature, and Art)

CALL FOR PAPERS

Border crossings delineate movement from a place, nation, and culture, inter alia, to another. Border crossers, Jane Jackson (2014) writes, can move temporarily or permanently, and crossings can be forced or voluntary, successful or unsuccessful, contemporary or historical. They can lead to multicultural identity formations, or to experiences and feelings of exclusion and isolation (Martin and Nakayama 2008). Because they are embodied experiences, they are determined by race, ethnicity, citizenship status, religion and gender, as well as by biopolitical and necropolitical practices, particularly, when deemed ‘irregular.’ Representations of border crossings play a key role in media, literature, visual, as well as performance arts. Historical and contemporary border crossings form a core segment of literary and artistic production as shown by the publication of literary and graphic migration narratives, museum exhibitions, installations in galleries and open public spaces, and via dance, music and theatre performances (Viljoen 2013). At the same time, representations of contemporary ‘irregular’ border crossings foreground the injurious implications of border control practices, as well as media responsibilities of a ‘crisis’ (Chouliaraki and Stolic 2017).

For this conference, we invite papers that explore representations of border crossings in media, literature, and the arts. We seek to examine the kinds of narratives that can be told through media, artistic and literary attempts to speak about border-crossing subjects. We hope to determine the extent to which such representations cross borders themselves by being exposed to culturally different audiences (Friedman 2005). We further mean to investigate how border-crossing ‘selves’ and ‘others’, collective, or individual, become displayed in such representations and whether hegemonic, (neo-)colonial hierarchies become undone or reproduced through them. How can a person in the position of the ‘host,’ for instance, ‘imagine another without doing violence to [their] object of description’ (Black 2010: 1)? How can representations of liminal, border-crossing subjects disrupt narratives of modernity/coloniality (Schimanski and Wolfe 2013; Mignolo 2011)? Can such representations show ‘how changing perceptions of borders relate to shifting aesthetic practices’ (Wolfe 2014: 1; Schimanski and Wolfe 2007)? How do they illustrate that ‘as the border crosser crosses the border, new […] borders are created and crossed in the crosser’s own story, and in the story of the border itself’ (Schimanski 2006: 47)? What are the strategies that would enable nuanced interpretations of such representations (see Schimanski and Wolfe 2017)?

We call for researchers and practitioners to submit proposals of up to 250 words for 20-minute presentations exploring border-crossings in literature, media and the arts. We also invite creative practitioners to submit performances, readings, (video) installations, and exhibitions, inter alia. The themes that can be explored include, but are not limited to:

• Exilic, diasporic, migrant, refugee, and asylum-seeking border crossers

• Border-crossing, gender, and sexuality

• Decolonial and postcolonial border-crossings

• Border-crossing traumas

• Border-crossing memories

• Affective border-crossings

• Border-crossing as an opportunity

• Metaphorical, cultural, and linguistic border crossings

Please submit your proposals to bordercrossing@uclan.ac.uk by 30th of June, 2022.

References:

Black, S. (2010), Fiction Across Borders: Imagining the Lives of Others in Late-Twentieth Century Fiction, New York : Columbia University Press.

Chouliaraki, L. and T. Stolic (2017), ‘Rethinking Media Responsibility in the Refugee “Crisis:” A Visual Typology of European News’, Media, Culture & Society, 39(8):1162-77.

Friedman, S. S. (2005), ‘Spatial Poetics and Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things’, in J. Phelan and P. J. Rabinowitz (eds), A Companion to Narrative Theory, 192-205, Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing.

Jackson, J. (2014), Introducing Language and Intercultural Communication, London: Routledge.

Martin, J.N. and Nakayama, T.K. (2008), Experiencing Intercultural Communication: An Introduction, New York: McGraw-Hill.

Mignolo, D. W. (2011), The Darker Side of Western Modernity: Global Futures, Decolonial Options, New York: Duke University Press.

Schimanski, J. (2006), ‘Crossing and Reading: Notes towards a Theory and Method’, Nordlit, 19: 41-63.

Schimanski, J. and S. Wolfe (2007), ‘Entry Points: An Introduction’ in J. Schimanski and S. Wolfe (eds), Border Poetics De-Limited, 9-26, Hannover: Wehrhahn Verlag.

____. (2013), ‘The Aesthetics of Borders’, in K. Aukrust (ed), Assigning Cultural Values, 235-250, Frankfurt: Peter Lang.

____. eds. (2017), Border Aesthetics: Concepts and Intersections, New York: Berghahn.

Viljoen, H., ed. (2013), Crossing Borders, Dissolving Boundaries, Amsterdam: Rodopi.

Wolfe, S. (2014), ‘Border Aesthetics/Border Works’, Nordlit, 31:1-5.

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“’My strength, my comfort, my intense delight’: Women, Art and Lifewriting in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries.”

Universities Art Association of Canada annual conference Oct 27-29, University of Toronto.

Deadline for abstracts: June 30.

Like her contemporary Eugène Delacroix, British watercolourist Elizabeth Murray left the “West” in the early 1800s for the “Orient,” recording her adventures in extensive writings and images. However, while Delacroix’s journals and notebooks became widely celebrated, Murray’s account slid into obscurity—even though Delacroix’s journey lasted only six months and generated two articles, while Murray’s time in the region prompted her two-volume autobiography Sixteen Years of an Artist’s Life in Morocco, Spain, and the Canary Islands. Moreover, accounts by other women from that century—Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun; Elizabeth Butler—similarly languished, creating the sense that this era’s female artists neither left home nor published autobiographies. This panel aims to explode this misapprehension by convening discussions of lifewriting by women artists of the 1800s and earlier. We welcome proposals regarding all lifewriting forms (e.g. diaries, letters), with particular interest in accounts originating outside normative “Western” narratives, and/or regarding now-obscure autobiographies.

Per standard practice, you need to join UAAC if your paper is accepted – but you don’t need to join to submit a proposal. Questions? creeve@ocadu.ca

Application process and full conference CFP here.

Charles Reeve

OCAD University

Chair, Liberal Studies

Faculty of Arts & Science

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CALL FOR PAPERS
North-American Novelists’ Autobiographical Acts: Nonfictional Disruptions

Aix-Marseilles University, 6/7 July 2023
Organizers: Sophie Vallas (Aix-Marseilles University, LERMA), Arnaud Schmitt (University of Bordeaux, CLIMAS)

Deadline for Submissions June 30, 2022
Addressing the topic of autobiographical texts or memoirs published by novelists, what she calls “the literary writer’s autobiography,” Laura Marcus underlines that the reader’s awareness of the name and reputation of the author immediately confers a certain literary status on the autobiographical text: “Not all autobiographers are writers by profession, though there is a widespread assumption that the literary writer’s autobiography best defines the genre.” Far from the host of confessional memoirs, either by celebrities or unknown authors, a publishing phenomenon identified by Rockwell Gray as a “memoir boom” in his 1982 article “Autobiography Now,” and far from so-called autobiographical novels or autofictions which, according to Maurice Couturier, allowed many writers to “smuggle their own autobiographies,” this conference will focus on autobiographical texts—paratextually and unequivocally identified as such—published by American novelists, on “the literary writer’s autobiography” in other words, and on their influence on the perception of the overall work of their author. We will wonder how autobiographical acts happen, when they happen, in a career dominated by fiction, what their links with the fictional part of the work are or why they are often perceived as minor texts among a fictional body of major ones. Also, do they conjure up specific writing techniques, a separate creative space? The disruption caused by autobiographical texts in a literary work mostly devoted to the writing of fiction raises several questions concerning the artistic logic underlying them, the way they are embedded in the complete oeuvre of the author and the editorial and paratextual choices made for their publication.
It often seems logical that authors should turn to life writing at the end of their career, an introspective act embracing their whole life, revisiting their own work. Mark Twain, who published a few chapters of his autobiography in the years prior to his death, decided nevertheless that its publication would be a posthumous act, a hundred years after his death more precisely (The Autobiography of Mark Twain, 2010). Other texts, also published late in their authors’ life, focus on the death of a relative or a friend while offering authors the opportunity to reflect on their own life, inexorably drawing to a close: Joan Didion’s autobiographical diptych, The Year of the Magical Thinking in 2005 (simultaneously mourning the death and celebrating the life of her husband, John Dunne) and Blue Nights in 2011 (doing the same for Didion’s adopted daughter, Quintana, who died in 2005), belongs to this crepuscular tradition in which writing almost amounts to issuing legal, performative acts standing for marriage, adoption, death. Such is also the case for Philip Roth’s Patrimony (1991). Conversely, some autobiographical texts herald the birth of an author: Paul Auster’s The Invention of Solitude (1982) delivered, in prose, the new voice of a poet and essayist who, from then on, would dedicate his career as a novelist to developing and fictionalizing many topics already present in this seminal memoir. Auster has gone on regularly publishing autobiographical narratives, each time revisiting his life from a different angle and adding new acts to the play of his life (The Red Notebook, 1995; Hand to Mouth, 1997; Winter Journal, 2012; Report from the Interior, 2013).
For other autobiographical texts, what is at stake is less the moment when they get written, either at the beginning or at the end of a career, than their capacity of exploring the very art of their authors. In that case, they tend to exist as so many comments on the fictional works which they occasionally revisit. Joyce Carol Oates, for instance, has kept on analyzing the act of writing throughout the years ((Woman) Writer: Occasions and Opportunities, 1974; The Faith of a Writer: Life, Craft, Art, 2003; A Widow’s Story. A Memoir, 2011; The Lost Landscape. A Writer’s Coming of Age, 2015). At the very opposite of Oates’ regular autobiographical practice, James Salter’s Burning the Days (1997) stands as a unique autobiographical text in a body of work otherwise entirely devoted to fiction, almost like a faulty act, even if the volume sounds like Salter’s powerful novels in terms of structure and voice, much to the delight of his readers. On the other hand, certain autobiographical texts, just like Richard Wright’s Black Boy (1945) for instance, can be seen as irreversible acts which eclipse the author’s fictional production.
Philippe Lejeune once regretted that “the dirty habit of publishing diaries has resulted into most people writing their privacy while decked out in their very best attire.” Is a novelist, and even more so an established one, not tempted, indeed, to write their autobiography in their best array, drifting away from spontaneous, supposedly authentic autobiographical acts which tend to be nowadays published on social networks? Autobiography indeed involves an element of risk and exposure since it may, whether purposefully or not, allow the reader to get a behind-the-scenes look at the making of fiction, and thus disrupt the construction of the figure of the author. Proposals may address, among other issues, the following:
– The origin of the autobiographical act in a novelist’s career
– The minor works/major works dialectics.
– Stylistic specificities of autobiographical narratives versus fictional texts
– The balance in an author’s oeuvre, and more specifically the place occupied by the autobiographical texts in the overall work
– The reception of the autobiographical texts, often isolated or unknown
– The dialogue between fictional and non-fictional texts within a work (Laura Marcus: “The literary writer’s autobiography also bears on, and frequently comments upon, his or her other works”)
– The tools needed for analysis (similar, different?) to study the autobiographical texts
– The persistence of a distance between the narrator and the author, even in an autobiographical text, similar to that embodied by the concept of implied narrator whose presence Jim Phelan, for example, detects even in referential texts such as Joan Didion’s The Year of MagicalThinking.

Tasavvur Collective’s 2022 Symposium – ‘Writing Muslim Women in South Asia’

deadline for submissions: 

July 1, 2022

Symposium, 5-6 August, 2022

Tasavvur Collective, Universities of Edinburgh, St. Andrews and Exeter

contact email:

Tasavvurcollective@gmail.com

Symposium Concept Note and Call for Papers

From the Aurat March in Pakistan to the Shaheen Bagh protests in India, Muslim women have been at the forefront of political change and social upheaval, both in recent years and in the past. With Bangladeshi lawyer Sara Hossain as the recipient of the International Women of Courage Award in 2016 for reforming legislation on violence against women and Arooj Aftab as the first Pakistani woman to win a Grammy in 2022, these achievements are also not limited to any single sphere of cultural influence. And yet, the dominant narrative surrounding the experiences of Muslim women continues to focus on the oppressions they have faced, with little to no consideration given to the way they have overcome these challenges. As such, the category of ‘Muslim Woman’ has been essentialised in ethonographic, Orientalist and neo-liberal discourses since it began to be ‘studied’, a narrative that scholars and activists alike are seeking to challenge more and more every day.

This essentialist discourse was recently highlighted across South Asia, thus proving the necessity of challenging such narratives. On March 15th 2022, the Karnataka High Court in India upheld a government order to deny entry to Muslim women who wear the hijab into educational institutions by ruling that the “hijab is not essential to Islam”. Two separate incidents of auctioning Muslim women online for ‘deals’ were reported within 8 months of each other between 2021-22 and the perpetrators of both were let off by the Delhi High Court on “humanitarian grounds”. In Sri Lanka, a similar anti-Muslim sentiment has been reverberating through the appeals of Buddhist monk group Bodu Bala Sena (BSS) to ban the burqa as a “sign of religious extremism”. Across the border in Pakistan, the Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam-Fazl (JUI-F) organised a ‘Hijab March’ in solidarity with the Muslim women in Karnataka in February 2022. Rather than focusing on freedom of choice, party leaders used the opportunity to take a stance against the Aurat March, an annual demonstration for women’s rights held across Pakistan on 8th March to coincide with International Women’s Day. Aurat March was, and is, constantly accused of violating haya (modesty), with particular reference made to“objectionable slogans” such as #MeraJismMeriMarzi.

There is a long and often neglected history of Muslim women intervening in debates about ‘reform’, decolonisation and citizenship to assert their own interests and identities, pioneering the rise of feminist scholarship and activism in South Asia. From Begum Rokeya Sakhawat Hosain to Kamila Shamsie, one can trace a history of Muslim women writers and thinkers who have fundamentally altered contemporary literary and political discourse. A careful examination of these narratives surrounding Muslim women’s intellectual and political existence validates the significant work of scholars like Shenila Khoja-Moolji and Yasmin Saikia, who have argued that attempts to emancipate Muslim women have had to contend with simultaneously imposing uniform, majoritarian models of femininity– whether it is colonial modernity or orthodox religiosity. Navigating these binaries of emancipation and oppression, Muslim women have carved their own identities to interrogate and subvert these categorisations. This symposium is an attempt to bring together scholars, thinkers, artists and activists to create such a discursive space for a timely conversation on Muslim women’s pasts and present.

Each of our panels foregrounds the agential capacity of Muslim women in writing themselves and others, as they contend with shifting dynamics of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and caste, within and with relation to South Asia. This symposium hopes to disrupt the essentializing discourse on Muslim women’s identity by exploring the polyphonic nature of human subjectivities.
Discussion topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Narratives of gender, sexuality and queerness Agency and artistic expression in Muslim women
  • Protest, resistance, and activism
  • Nationalism, nation and gender; Partition(s) Space, place and temporality
  • Purdah, privacy and public discourse
  • Marriage, family, and domesticity
  • Technology; social media; cybercrime
  • Sair: narratives of travel, cosmopolitanism and mobility
  • ‘Modern’ Muslim women; self-fashioning in the age of empire
  • Sharif Ladki: reform, education and girlhood
  • Zaat: intersections of caste and gender in South Asian Islam
  • Begumati Zubaan: gender and multilingualism

We invite established academics and early-career/PhD scholars within the fields of humanities and social sciences, and outside of these realms, as well as non-academic voices working on and representing Muslim women’s perspectives with reference to South Asia to present 20-minute papers, mixed-media presentations or any other forms of discussion on or around the above themes. Please send 300 word abstracts/presentation outlines including a short biography of not more than 100 words to tasavvurcollective@gmail.com. The deadline for submission of abstracts is 1st July 2022, and selected participants will be contacted with the final schedule by 15th July 2022. The symposium will be held online via Zoom on 5th-6th August 2022.

Symposium organisers: Fatima Z. Naveed (University of Exeter), Sheelalipi Sahana (University of Edinburgh) and
Zehra Kazmi (University of St. Andrews) of the Tasavvur Collective. Follow us on Twitter: @tasavvurcollect for updates.

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On (Re)Shaping Identity: Self-Portraiture and the Quotidian

PAMLA 2022 – Los Angeles, CA (November 11-13, 2022 – entirely in-person

deadline for submissions: 

July 1, 2022

Please contact presiding officer for this session, Ariana Lyriotakis, with any questions: lyriotaa@tcd.ie

Special Session – CFP

Persona and confessional poetry of the Postmodern period enact an undeniable relationship with the quotidian. But how do these poems explore a visual depiction and an expression of self-identity in ordinary life? This panel will explore the methods by which poets manipulate and reject aesthetic production in their poetry, while calling into question subjectivity and truthful composition.

This special session will explore poetic self-portraiture and the shaping of identity within the bounds of the quotidian. John Ashbery’s “Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror” is perhaps one of the more notable examples from this era; as a poetry firmly situated within the intermediality of poetic textual images and art, he addresses “the enchant of self with self” through personal depiction and aesthetic production. But what is revealed to the reader in these moments of vulnerability and self-appraisal? How can the poet be both subject and object, while constructing a poetic likeness amongst the commonplace? This panel seeks poetry of self-encounter, whether banal or familiar, to interrogate an inward/outward representation of the self within these constructs.

Contributions are invited relating to any of the following aspects, as well as broader interpretations of the theme which may illuminate and elucidate in greater detail. Please be in touch if you have any questions or require further clarification.

  • Depictions of the domestic and the visual
  • Intermediality of poetic textual images and art
  • Interrogations of the actual and the self
  • Orality and performance in poetry
  • Visuality of text and experimentation
  • Mimesis and the composition of ordinary spaces
  • Interdeterminacy and temporality

Abstracts must be submitted through the PAMLA website only.

The web address for this session’s CFP is: https://pamla.ballastacademic.com/Home/S/18564

All panel participants/presenters must join PAMLA by July 1, 2022.

https://pamla.ballastacademic.com

CALL FOR PAPERS: 

LIFE WRITING AS WORLD LITERATURE (book)

Deadline for abstracts: July 1, 2022

Deadline for final essays: January 1, 2023

The series Literatures as World Literature by Bloomsbury Publishing aims to “take a novel approach to world literature by analyzing specific constellations — according to language, nation, form, or theme — of literary texts and authors in their own world-literary dimensions.” https://www.bloomsbury.com/us/series/literatures-as-world-literature/

The proposed volume will be dedicated to life writing. We use “life writing” as a broad term encompassing a wide variety of personal narratives. We also recognize the capaciousness of the term “world literature” and the accompanying challenges. By putting life writing and world literature into dialogue, we seek to explore their rich shared history, as well as new areas of research.

Authors are encouraged to explore, among others
the intersecting histories of the two fields
debates in world literature concerning auto/biographical genres
autobiographical texts outside the Western canons (East Asia, Latin America, Northern Africa, Middle East)
autobiographical works as they move in translation through global contexts
autobiographical works as they move across time and media (remediation, intermediality, etc.)
the role of materiality in life writing
visual narratives, new media, affective networks, and the role of life writing in participatory democracy
autobiographical texts in “world literature” courses and in cultural diplomacy
the role of autobiographical texts in eco or medical humanities
the homogenizing effects of autobiographical technology and data bias

Please submit abstracts of 350 words, along with a short bio, to the Editors: Helga Lenart-Cheng (hl4@stmarys-ca.edu) and Ioana Luca (ioana.luca@ntnu.edu.tw) by July 1, 2022.

Helga Lenart-Cheng
Associate Professor
World Languages and Cultures
Honors Program, Director
Saint Mary’s College of California
Book office hours here
Forthcoming in 2022: Story Revolutions: Collective Narratives from the Enlightenment to the Digital Age

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Tasavvur Collective’s 2022 Symposium – ‘Writing Muslim Women in South Asia’

deadline for submissions: 

July 1, 2022

Tasavvur Collective, Universities of Edinburgh, St. Andrews and Exeter

contact email:

Tasavvurcollective@gmail.com

Symposium Concept Note and Call for Papers

From the Aurat March in Pakistan to the Shaheen Bagh protests in India, Muslim women have been at the forefront of political change and social upheaval, both in recent years and in the past. With Bangladeshi lawyer Sara Hossain as the recipient of the International Women of Courage Award in 2016 for reforming legislation on violence against women and Arooj Aftab as the first Pakistani woman to win a Grammy in 2022, these achievements are also not limited to any single sphere of cultural influence. And yet, the dominant narrative surrounding the experiences of Muslim women continues to focus on the oppressions they have faced, with little to no consideration given to the way they have overcome these challenges. As such, the category of ‘Muslim Woman’ has been essentialised in ethonographic, Orientalist and neo-liberal discourses since it began to be ‘studied’, a narrative that scholars and activists alike are seeking to challenge more and more every day.

This essentialist discourse was recently highlighted across South Asia, thus proving the necessity of challenging such narratives. On March 15th 2022, the Karnataka High Court in India upheld a government order to deny entry to Muslim women who wear the hijab into educational institutions by ruling that the “hijab is not essential to Islam”. Two separate incidents of auctioning Muslim women online for ‘deals’ were reported within 8 months of each other between 2021-22 and the perpetrators of both were let off by the Delhi High Court on “humanitarian grounds”. In Sri Lanka, a similar anti-Muslim sentiment has been reverberating through the appeals of Buddhist monk group Bodu Bala Sena (BSS) to ban the burqa as a “sign of religious extremism”. Across the border in Pakistan, the Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam-Fazl (JUI-F) organised a ‘Hijab March’ in solidarity with the Muslim women in Karnataka in February 2022. Rather than focusing on freedom of choice, party leaders used the opportunity to take a stance against the Aurat March, an annual demonstration for women’s rights held across Pakistan on 8th March to coincide with International Women’s Day. Aurat March was, and is, constantly accused of violating haya (modesty), with particular reference made to“objectionable slogans” such as #MeraJismMeriMarzi.

There is a long and often neglected history of Muslim women intervening in debates about ‘reform’, decolonisation and citizenship to assert their own interests and identities, pioneering the rise of feminist scholarship and activism in South Asia. From Begum Rokeya Sakhawat Hosain to Kamila Shamsie, one can trace a history of Muslim women writers and thinkers who have fundamentally altered contemporary literary and political discourse. A careful examination of these narratives surrounding Muslim women’s intellectual and political existence validates the significant work of scholars like Shenila Khoja-Moolji and Yasmin Saikia, who have argued that attempts to emancipate Muslim women have had to contend with simultaneously imposing uniform, majoritarian models of femininity– whether it is colonial modernity or orthodox religiosity. Navigating these binaries of emancipation and oppression, Muslim women have carved their own identities to interrogate and subvert these categorisations. This symposium is an attempt to bring together scholars, thinkers, artists and activists to create such a discursive space for a timely conversation on Muslim women’s pasts and present.

Each of our panels foregrounds the agential capacity of Muslim women in writing themselves and others, as they contend with shifting dynamics of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and caste, within and with relation to South Asia. This symposium hopes to disrupt the essentializing discourse on Muslim women’s identity by exploring the polyphonic nature of human subjectivities.
Discussion topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Narratives of gender, sexuality and queerness Agency and artistic expression in Muslim women
  • Protest, resistance, and activism
  • Nationalism, nation and gender; Partition(s) Space, place and temporality
  • Purdah, privacy and public discourse
  • Marriage, family, and domesticity
  • Technology; social media; cybercrime
  • Sair: narratives of travel, cosmopolitanism and mobility
  • ‘Modern’ Muslim women; self-fashioning in the age of empire
  • Sharif Ladki: reform, education and girlhood
  • Zaat: intersections of caste and gender in South Asian Islam
  • Begumati Zubaan: gender and multilingualism

We invite established academics and early-career/PhD scholars within the fields of humanities and social sciences, and outside of these realms, as well as non-academic voices working on and representing Muslim women’s perspectives with reference to South Asia to present 20-minute papers, mixed-media presentations or any other forms of discussion on or around the above themes. Please send 300 word abstracts/presentation outlines including a short biography of not more than 100 words to tasavvurcollective@gmail.com. The deadline for submission of abstracts is 1st July 2022, and selected participants will be contacted with the final schedule by 15th July 2022. The symposium will be held online via Zoom on 5th-6th August 2022.

Symposium organisers: Fatima Z. Naveed (University of Exeter), Sheelalipi Sahana (University of Edinburgh) and
Zehra Kazmi (University of St. Andrews) of the Tasavvur Collective. Follow us on Twitter: @tasavvurcollect for updates.

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Deadline for Submissions: July 1, 2022

Reimagining #MeToo in South Asia And the Diaspora (Edited Collection of Essays)

Dr. Nidhi Shrivastava

contact email:

shrivastavan@sacredheart.edu

This edited volume seeks to examine how sexual violence and feminist interventions in South Asia and the Diaspora have been articulated in the context of but, more importantly, in opposition to the #MeToo Movement. We seek to understand how the feminist movement has radically diverged from the assimilationist discourse of the #MeToo Movement and, consequently, the Global North. The #MeToo movement has not made an impact at the grassroots level because it is hinged on the victim-survivor to speak up. In an era where the Global North has been a model for influencing change in the Global South, there has been an inconspicuous absence of recognition and impact of the #MeToo Movement. In addition, survivors’ testimonies lie at the center of the #MeToo movement, which demystifies victim-shaming and victim-blaming, legitimizing the survivor’s testimony as the unquestionable truth.

Since 2017, the #MeToo movement has been successful in the conviction of Harvey Weinstein, who was at the center of the landmark trial. The #MeToo has had a significant impact worldwide on how we understand sexual harassment, rape, and gendered violence, especially in the US. However, this global women’s movement has had little reach in South Asia, where access to virtual platforms is limited, and hashtags are still unknown. The #MeToo Movement in South Asia and the Diaspora was taken up briefly by the media and entertainment industry but has failed to make a concrete impact in many ways. This can be attributed to multiple reasons – there are several regionally specific movements, such as the 2009 Pink Chaddi Campaign and 2011 #WhyLoiter campaign, that have been radically popular within the sub-continent.

In the South Asian context, such testimonies are still taboo, which leads to survivors refusing to share and relive their experiences/narratives even if they have the means and access. Therefore, our edited volume seeks to problematize the #MeToo movement in order to reimagine and contextualize it in South Asia and the South Asian diaspora as a much-needed intervention to examine the implications of a transnational feminist movement. We wish to explore questions such as: how the #MeToo movement can move away from Hollywood/Bollywood/workplace and elitist exclusivity. How can it be more inclusive of non-white and marginalized voices?

In light of the ongoing and increasing gender-based violence occurring in South Asia and the diaspora, our edited volume will reflect on these questions as we seek to understand new ways of formulating complex and nuanced gendered subjectivities vis-à-vis the lens of post-colonial feminism and intersectionality. Our focus shifts away from the traditional approaches of victimization to generate dialogue and hopefully create a new platform to break the silence and encourage discomforting narratives to normalize conversations surrounding this pivotal issue.

Themes include but are not limited to the following:

  • Pedagogy and Transformative Learning via #MeToo in the Classroom
  • Queer/LGBTQI+ Spaces within #MeToo
  • New Masculinities
  • Contemporary Gender Movements and Resistances
  • Caste, Gender, Class, and Social Spaces
  • Problematization of #MeToo and ‘Speaking Up’
  • New Modalities of Testimonies
  • Resistance and Digital Feminist Interventions
  • New Feminist Mediations
  • Militarized Feminist Modernities
  • Ageism
  • Viral Videos
  • Censorship, Cultural Production, and Minority Literature
  • Mythologies, Legends, and Sexuality

We welcome informal queries, and potential contributors may submit a 500-750 word abstract and 2 page CV by July 1, 2022. Please direct queries to Dr Nidhi Shrivastava (Sacred Heart University), shrivastavan@sacredheart.edu, Dr Ruma Sinha (Syracuse University), rumas1@gmail.com, and Dr Billie T. Guarino (Jamia Milia Islamia), thoidingjam@gmail.com. Acceptance of the final articles is subject to double-blind peer review. The final deadline for submitting 5,000- 6,000-word articles will be November 15, 2022.

Deadline for Submissions June 30, 2022

Representations of Border Crossings in Media, Literature, and the Arts

International Academic Conference:15-16 December 2022

MIDEX Centre, University of Central Lancashire

(Research Strand: Representations of Migration, Diaspora and Exile in Media, Literature, and Art)

CALL FOR PAPERS

Border crossings delineate movement from a place, nation, and culture, inter alia, to another. Border crossers, Jane Jackson (2014) writes, can move temporarily or permanently, and crossings can be forced or voluntary, successful or unsuccessful, contemporary or historical. They can lead to multicultural identity formations, or to experiences and feelings of exclusion and isolation (Martin and Nakayama 2008). Because they are embodied experiences, they are determined by race, ethnicity, citizenship status, religion and gender, as well as by biopolitical and necropolitical practices, particularly, when deemed ‘irregular.’ Representations of border crossings play a key role in media, literature, visual, as well as performance arts. Historical and contemporary border crossings form a core segment of literary and artistic production as shown by the publication of literary and graphic migration narratives, museum exhibitions, installations in galleries and open public spaces, and via dance, music and theatre performances (Viljoen 2013). At the same time, representations of contemporary ‘irregular’ border crossings foreground the injurious implications of border control practices, as well as media responsibilities of a ‘crisis’ (Chouliaraki and Stolic 2017).

For this conference, we invite papers that explore representations of border crossings in media, literature, and the arts. We seek to examine the kinds of narratives that can be told through media, artistic and literary attempts to speak about border-crossing subjects. We hope to determine the extent to which such representations cross borders themselves by being exposed to culturally different audiences (Friedman 2005). We further mean to investigate how border-crossing ‘selves’ and ‘others’, collective, or individual, become displayed in such representations and whether hegemonic, (neo-)colonial hierarchies become undone or reproduced through them. How can a person in the position of the ‘host,’ for instance, ‘imagine another without doing violence to [their] object of description’ (Black 2010: 1)? How can representations of liminal, border-crossing subjects disrupt narratives of modernity/coloniality (Schimanski and Wolfe 2013; Mignolo 2011)? Can such representations show ‘how changing perceptions of borders relate to shifting aesthetic practices’ (Wolfe 2014: 1; Schimanski and Wolfe 2007)? How do they illustrate that ‘as the border crosser crosses the border, new […] borders are created and crossed in the crosser’s own story, and in the story of the border itself’ (Schimanski 2006: 47)? What are the strategies that would enable nuanced interpretations of such representations (see Schimanski and Wolfe 2017)?

We call for researchers and practitioners to submit proposals of up to 250 words for 20-minute presentations exploring border-crossings in literature, media and the arts. We also invite creative practitioners to submit performances, readings, (video) installations, and exhibitions, inter alia. The themes that can be explored include, but are not limited to:

• Exilic, diasporic, migrant, refugee, and asylum-seeking border crossers

• Border-crossing, gender, and sexuality

• Decolonial and postcolonial border-crossings

• Border-crossing traumas

• Border-crossing memories

• Affective border-crossings

• Border-crossing as an opportunity

• Metaphorical, cultural, and linguistic border crossings

Please submit your proposals to bordercrossing@uclan.ac.uk by 30th of June, 2022.

References:

Black, S. (2010), Fiction Across Borders: Imagining the Lives of Others in Late-Twentieth Century Fiction, New York : Columbia University Press.

Chouliaraki, L. and T. Stolic (2017), ‘Rethinking Media Responsibility in the Refugee “Crisis:” A Visual Typology of European News’, Media, Culture & Society, 39(8):1162-77.

Friedman, S. S. (2005), ‘Spatial Poetics and Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things’, in J. Phelan and P. J. Rabinowitz (eds), A Companion to Narrative Theory, 192-205, Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing.

Jackson, J. (2014), Introducing Language and Intercultural Communication, London: Routledge.

Martin, J.N. and Nakayama, T.K. (2008), Experiencing Intercultural Communication: An Introduction, New York: McGraw-Hill.

Mignolo, D. W. (2011), The Darker Side of Western Modernity: Global Futures, Decolonial Options, New York: Duke University Press.

Schimanski, J. (2006), ‘Crossing and Reading: Notes towards a Theory and Method’, Nordlit, 19: 41-63.

Schimanski, J. and S. Wolfe (2007), ‘Entry Points: An Introduction’ in J. Schimanski and S. Wolfe (eds), Border Poetics De-Limited, 9-26, Hannover: Wehrhahn Verlag.

____. (2013), ‘The Aesthetics of Borders’, in K. Aukrust (ed), Assigning Cultural Values, 235-250, Frankfurt: Peter Lang.

____. eds. (2017), Border Aesthetics: Concepts and Intersections, New York: Berghahn.

Viljoen, H., ed. (2013), Crossing Borders, Dissolving Boundaries, Amsterdam: Rodopi.

Wolfe, S. (2014), ‘Border Aesthetics/Border Works’, Nordlit, 31:1-5.

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“’My strength, my comfort, my intense delight’: Women, Art and Lifewriting in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries.”

Universities Art Association of Canada annual conference Oct 27-29, University of Toronto.

Deadline for abstracts: June 30.

Like her contemporary Eugène Delacroix, British watercolourist Elizabeth Murray left the “West” in the early 1800s for the “Orient,” recording her adventures in extensive writings and images. However, while Delacroix’s journals and notebooks became widely celebrated, Murray’s account slid into obscurity—even though Delacroix’s journey lasted only six months and generated two articles, while Murray’s time in the region prompted her two-volume autobiography Sixteen Years of an Artist’s Life in Morocco, Spain, and the Canary Islands. Moreover, accounts by other women from that century—Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun; Elizabeth Butler—similarly languished, creating the sense that this era’s female artists neither left home nor published autobiographies. This panel aims to explode this misapprehension by convening discussions of lifewriting by women artists of the 1800s and earlier. We welcome proposals regarding all lifewriting forms (e.g. diaries, letters), with particular interest in accounts originating outside normative “Western” narratives, and/or regarding now-obscure autobiographies.

Per standard practice, you need to join UAAC if your paper is accepted – but you don’t need to join to submit a proposal. Questions? creeve@ocadu.ca

Application process and full conference CFP here.

Charles Reeve

OCAD University

Chair, Liberal Studies

Faculty of Arts & Science

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CALL FOR PAPERS
North-American Novelists’ Autobiographical Acts: Nonfictional Disruptions

Aix-Marseilles University, 6/7 July 2023
Organizers: Sophie Vallas (Aix-Marseilles University, LERMA), Arnaud Schmitt (University of Bordeaux, CLIMAS)

Deadline for Submissions June 30, 2022
Addressing the topic of autobiographical texts or memoirs published by novelists, what she calls “the literary writer’s autobiography,” Laura Marcus underlines that the reader’s awareness of the name and reputation of the author immediately confers a certain literary status on the autobiographical text: “Not all autobiographers are writers by profession, though there is a widespread assumption that the literary writer’s autobiography best defines the genre.” Far from the host of confessional memoirs, either by celebrities or unknown authors, a publishing phenomenon identified by Rockwell Gray as a “memoir boom” in his 1982 article “Autobiography Now,” and far from so-called autobiographical novels or autofictions which, according to Maurice Couturier, allowed many writers to “smuggle their own autobiographies,” this conference will focus on autobiographical texts—paratextually and unequivocally identified as such—published by American novelists, on “the literary writer’s autobiography” in other words, and on their influence on the perception of the overall work of their author. We will wonder how autobiographical acts happen, when they happen, in a career dominated by fiction, what their links with the fictional part of the work are or why they are often perceived as minor texts among a fictional body of major ones. Also, do they conjure up specific writing techniques, a separate creative space? The disruption caused by autobiographical texts in a literary work mostly devoted to the writing of fiction raises several questions concerning the artistic logic underlying them, the way they are embedded in the complete oeuvre of the author and the editorial and paratextual choices made for their publication.
It often seems logical that authors should turn to life writing at the end of their career, an introspective act embracing their whole life, revisiting their own work. Mark Twain, who published a few chapters of his autobiography in the years prior to his death, decided nevertheless that its publication would be a posthumous act, a hundred years after his death more precisely (The Autobiography of Mark Twain, 2010). Other texts, also published late in their authors’ life, focus on the death of a relative or a friend while offering authors the opportunity to reflect on their own life, inexorably drawing to a close: Joan Didion’s autobiographical diptych, The Year of the Magical Thinking in 2005 (simultaneously mourning the death and celebrating the life of her husband, John Dunne) and Blue Nights in 2011 (doing the same for Didion’s adopted daughter, Quintana, who died in 2005), belongs to this crepuscular tradition in which writing almost amounts to issuing legal, performative acts standing for marriage, adoption, death. Such is also the case for Philip Roth’s Patrimony (1991). Conversely, some autobiographical texts herald the birth of an author: Paul Auster’s The Invention of Solitude (1982) delivered, in prose, the new voice of a poet and essayist who, from then on, would dedicate his career as a novelist to developing and fictionalizing many topics already present in this seminal memoir. Auster has gone on regularly publishing autobiographical narratives, each time revisiting his life from a different angle and adding new acts to the play of his life (The Red Notebook, 1995; Hand to Mouth, 1997; Winter Journal, 2012; Report from the Interior, 2013).
For other autobiographical texts, what is at stake is less the moment when they get written, either at the beginning or at the end of a career, than their capacity of exploring the very art of their authors. In that case, they tend to exist as so many comments on the fictional works which they occasionally revisit. Joyce Carol Oates, for instance, has kept on analyzing the act of writing throughout the years ((Woman) Writer: Occasions and Opportunities, 1974; The Faith of a Writer: Life, Craft, Art, 2003; A Widow’s Story. A Memoir, 2011; The Lost Landscape. A Writer’s Coming of Age, 2015). At the very opposite of Oates’ regular autobiographical practice, James Salter’s Burning the Days (1997) stands as a unique autobiographical text in a body of work otherwise entirely devoted to fiction, almost like a faulty act, even if the volume sounds like Salter’s powerful novels in terms of structure and voice, much to the delight of his readers. On the other hand, certain autobiographical texts, just like Richard Wright’s Black Boy (1945) for instance, can be seen as irreversible acts which eclipse the author’s fictional production.
Philippe Lejeune once regretted that “the dirty habit of publishing diaries has resulted into most people writing their privacy while decked out in their very best attire.” Is a novelist, and even more so an established one, not tempted, indeed, to write their autobiography in their best array, drifting away from spontaneous, supposedly authentic autobiographical acts which tend to be nowadays published on social networks? Autobiography indeed involves an element of risk and exposure since it may, whether purposefully or not, allow the reader to get a behind-the-scenes look at the making of fiction, and thus disrupt the construction of the figure of the author. Proposals may address, among other issues, the following:
– The origin of the autobiographical act in a novelist’s career
– The minor works/major works dialectics.
– Stylistic specificities of autobiographical narratives versus fictional texts
– The balance in an author’s oeuvre, and more specifically the place occupied by the autobiographical texts in the overall work
– The reception of the autobiographical texts, often isolated or unknown
– The dialogue between fictional and non-fictional texts within a work (Laura Marcus: “The literary writer’s autobiography also bears on, and frequently comments upon, his or her other works”)
– The tools needed for analysis (similar, different?) to study the autobiographical texts
– The persistence of a distance between the narrator and the author, even in an autobiographical text, similar to that embodied by the concept of implied narrator whose presence Jim Phelan, for example, detects even in referential texts such as Joan Didion’s The Year of MagicalThinking.

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Tasavvur Collective’s 2022 Symposium – ‘Writing Muslim Women in South Asia’

deadline for submissions: 

July 1, 2022

Symposium, 5-6 August, 2022

Tasavvur Collective, Universities of Edinburgh, St. Andrews and Exeter

contact email:

Tasavvurcollective@gmail.com

Symposium Concept Note and Call for Papers

From the Aurat March in Pakistan to the Shaheen Bagh protests in India, Muslim women have been at the forefront of political change and social upheaval, both in recent years and in the past. With Bangladeshi lawyer Sara Hossain as the recipient of the International Women of Courage Award in 2016 for reforming legislation on violence against women and Arooj Aftab as the first Pakistani woman to win a Grammy in 2022, these achievements are also not limited to any single sphere of cultural influence. And yet, the dominant narrative surrounding the experiences of Muslim women continues to focus on the oppressions they have faced, with little to no consideration given to the way they have overcome these challenges. As such, the category of ‘Muslim Woman’ has been essentialised in ethonographic, Orientalist and neo-liberal discourses since it began to be ‘studied’, a narrative that scholars and activists alike are seeking to challenge more and more every day.

This essentialist discourse was recently highlighted across South Asia, thus proving the necessity of challenging such narratives. On March 15th 2022, the Karnataka High Court in India upheld a government order to deny entry to Muslim women who wear the hijab into educational institutions by ruling that the “hijab is not essential to Islam”. Two separate incidents of auctioning Muslim women online for ‘deals’ were reported within 8 months of each other between 2021-22 and the perpetrators of both were let off by the Delhi High Court on “humanitarian grounds”. In Sri Lanka, a similar anti-Muslim sentiment has been reverberating through the appeals of Buddhist monk group Bodu Bala Sena (BSS) to ban the burqa as a “sign of religious extremism”. Across the border in Pakistan, the Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam-Fazl (JUI-F) organised a ‘Hijab March’ in solidarity with the Muslim women in Karnataka in February 2022. Rather than focusing on freedom of choice, party leaders used the opportunity to take a stance against the Aurat March, an annual demonstration for women’s rights held across Pakistan on 8th March to coincide with International Women’s Day. Aurat March was, and is, constantly accused of violating haya (modesty), with particular reference made to“objectionable slogans” such as #MeraJismMeriMarzi.

There is a long and often neglected history of Muslim women intervening in debates about ‘reform’, decolonisation and citizenship to assert their own interests and identities, pioneering the rise of feminist scholarship and activism in South Asia. From Begum Rokeya Sakhawat Hosain to Kamila Shamsie, one can trace a history of Muslim women writers and thinkers who have fundamentally altered contemporary literary and political discourse. A careful examination of these narratives surrounding Muslim women’s intellectual and political existence validates the significant work of scholars like Shenila Khoja-Moolji and Yasmin Saikia, who have argued that attempts to emancipate Muslim women have had to contend with simultaneously imposing uniform, majoritarian models of femininity– whether it is colonial modernity or orthodox religiosity. Navigating these binaries of emancipation and oppression, Muslim women have carved their own identities to interrogate and subvert these categorisations. This symposium is an attempt to bring together scholars, thinkers, artists and activists to create such a discursive space for a timely conversation on Muslim women’s pasts and present.

Each of our panels foregrounds the agential capacity of Muslim women in writing themselves and others, as they contend with shifting dynamics of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and caste, within and with relation to South Asia. This symposium hopes to disrupt the essentializing discourse on Muslim women’s identity by exploring the polyphonic nature of human subjectivities.
Discussion topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Narratives of gender, sexuality and queerness Agency and artistic expression in Muslim women
  • Protest, resistance, and activism
  • Nationalism, nation and gender; Partition(s) Space, place and temporality
  • Purdah, privacy and public discourse
  • Marriage, family, and domesticity
  • Technology; social media; cybercrime
  • Sair: narratives of travel, cosmopolitanism and mobility
  • ‘Modern’ Muslim women; self-fashioning in the age of empire
  • Sharif Ladki: reform, education and girlhood
  • Zaat: intersections of caste and gender in South Asian Islam
  • Begumati Zubaan: gender and multilingualism

We invite established academics and early-career/PhD scholars within the fields of humanities and social sciences, and outside of these realms, as well as non-academic voices working on and representing Muslim women’s perspectives with reference to South Asia to present 20-minute papers, mixed-media presentations or any other forms of discussion on or around the above themes. Please send 300 word abstracts/presentation outlines including a short biography of not more than 100 words to tasavvurcollective@gmail.com. The deadline for submission of abstracts is 1st July 2022, and selected participants will be contacted with the final schedule by 15th July 2022. The symposium will be held online via Zoom on 5th-6th August 2022.

Symposium organisers: Fatima Z. Naveed (University of Exeter), Sheelalipi Sahana (University of Edinburgh) and
Zehra Kazmi (University of St. Andrews) of the Tasavvur Collective. Follow us on Twitter: @tasavvurcollect for updates.

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On (Re)Shaping Identity: Self-Portraiture and the Quotidian

PAMLA 2022 – Los Angeles, CA (November 11-13, 2022 – entirely in-person

deadline for submissions: 

July 1, 2022

Please contact presiding officer for this session, Ariana Lyriotakis, with any questions: lyriotaa@tcd.ie

Special Session – CFP

Persona and confessional poetry of the Postmodern period enact an undeniable relationship with the quotidian. But how do these poems explore a visual depiction and an expression of self-identity in ordinary life? This panel will explore the methods by which poets manipulate and reject aesthetic production in their poetry, while calling into question subjectivity and truthful composition.

This special session will explore poetic self-portraiture and the shaping of identity within the bounds of the quotidian. John Ashbery’s “Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror” is perhaps one of the more notable examples from this era; as a poetry firmly situated within the intermediality of poetic textual images and art, he addresses “the enchant of self with self” through personal depiction and aesthetic production. But what is revealed to the reader in these moments of vulnerability and self-appraisal? How can the poet be both subject and object, while constructing a poetic likeness amongst the commonplace? This panel seeks poetry of self-encounter, whether banal or familiar, to interrogate an inward/outward representation of the self within these constructs.

Contributions are invited relating to any of the following aspects, as well as broader interpretations of the theme which may illuminate and elucidate in greater detail. Please be in touch if you have any questions or require further clarification.

  • Depictions of the domestic and the visual
  • Intermediality of poetic textual images and art
  • Interrogations of the actual and the self
  • Orality and performance in poetry
  • Visuality of text and experimentation
  • Mimesis and the composition of ordinary spaces
  • Interdeterminacy and temporality

Abstracts must be submitted through the PAMLA website only.

The web address for this session’s CFP is: https://pamla.ballastacademic.com/Home/S/18564

All panel participants/presenters must join PAMLA by July 1, 2022.

https://pamla.ballastacademic.com

CALL FOR PAPERS: 

LIFE WRITING AS WORLD LITERATURE (book)

Deadline for abstracts: July 1, 2022

Deadline for final essays: January 1, 2023

The series Literatures as World Literature by Bloomsbury Publishing aims to “take a novel approach to world literature by analyzing specific constellations — according to language, nation, form, or theme — of literary texts and authors in their own world-literary dimensions.” https://www.bloomsbury.com/us/series/literatures-as-world-literature/

The proposed volume will be dedicated to life writing. We use “life writing” as a broad term encompassing a wide variety of personal narratives. We also recognize the capaciousness of the term “world literature” and the accompanying challenges. By putting life writing and world literature into dialogue, we seek to explore their rich shared history, as well as new areas of research.

Authors are encouraged to explore, among others
the intersecting histories of the two fields
debates in world literature concerning auto/biographical genres
autobiographical texts outside the Western canons (East Asia, Latin America, Northern Africa, Middle East)
autobiographical works as they move in translation through global contexts
autobiographical works as they move across time and media (remediation, intermediality, etc.)
the role of materiality in life writing
visual narratives, new media, affective networks, and the role of life writing in participatory democracy
autobiographical texts in “world literature” courses and in cultural diplomacy
the role of autobiographical texts in eco or medical humanities
the homogenizing effects of autobiographical technology and data bias

Please submit abstracts of 350 words, along with a short bio, to the Editors: Helga Lenart-Cheng (hl4@stmarys-ca.edu) and Ioana Luca (ioana.luca@ntnu.edu.tw) by July 1, 2022.

Helga Lenart-Cheng
Associate Professor
World Languages and Cultures
Honors Program, Director
Saint Mary’s College of California
Book office hours here
Forthcoming in 2022: Story Revolutions: Collective Narratives from the Enlightenment to the Digital Age

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Tasavvur Collective’s 2022 Symposium – ‘Writing Muslim Women in South Asia’

deadline for submissions: 

July 1, 2022

Tasavvur Collective, Universities of Edinburgh, St. Andrews and Exeter

contact email:

Tasavvurcollective@gmail.com

Symposium Concept Note and Call for Papers

From the Aurat March in Pakistan to the Shaheen Bagh protests in India, Muslim women have been at the forefront of political change and social upheaval, both in recent years and in the past. With Bangladeshi lawyer Sara Hossain as the recipient of the International Women of Courage Award in 2016 for reforming legislation on violence against women and Arooj Aftab as the first Pakistani woman to win a Grammy in 2022, these achievements are also not limited to any single sphere of cultural influence. And yet, the dominant narrative surrounding the experiences of Muslim women continues to focus on the oppressions they have faced, with little to no consideration given to the way they have overcome these challenges. As such, the category of ‘Muslim Woman’ has been essentialised in ethonographic, Orientalist and neo-liberal discourses since it began to be ‘studied’, a narrative that scholars and activists alike are seeking to challenge more and more every day.

This essentialist discourse was recently highlighted across South Asia, thus proving the necessity of challenging such narratives. On March 15th 2022, the Karnataka High Court in India upheld a government order to deny entry to Muslim women who wear the hijab into educational institutions by ruling that the “hijab is not essential to Islam”. Two separate incidents of auctioning Muslim women online for ‘deals’ were reported within 8 months of each other between 2021-22 and the perpetrators of both were let off by the Delhi High Court on “humanitarian grounds”. In Sri Lanka, a similar anti-Muslim sentiment has been reverberating through the appeals of Buddhist monk group Bodu Bala Sena (BSS) to ban the burqa as a “sign of religious extremism”. Across the border in Pakistan, the Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam-Fazl (JUI-F) organised a ‘Hijab March’ in solidarity with the Muslim women in Karnataka in February 2022. Rather than focusing on freedom of choice, party leaders used the opportunity to take a stance against the Aurat March, an annual demonstration for women’s rights held across Pakistan on 8th March to coincide with International Women’s Day. Aurat March was, and is, constantly accused of violating haya (modesty), with particular reference made to“objectionable slogans” such as #MeraJismMeriMarzi.

There is a long and often neglected history of Muslim women intervening in debates about ‘reform’, decolonisation and citizenship to assert their own interests and identities, pioneering the rise of feminist scholarship and activism in South Asia. From Begum Rokeya Sakhawat Hosain to Kamila Shamsie, one can trace a history of Muslim women writers and thinkers who have fundamentally altered contemporary literary and political discourse. A careful examination of these narratives surrounding Muslim women’s intellectual and political existence validates the significant work of scholars like Shenila Khoja-Moolji and Yasmin Saikia, who have argued that attempts to emancipate Muslim women have had to contend with simultaneously imposing uniform, majoritarian models of femininity– whether it is colonial modernity or orthodox religiosity. Navigating these binaries of emancipation and oppression, Muslim women have carved their own identities to interrogate and subvert these categorisations. This symposium is an attempt to bring together scholars, thinkers, artists and activists to create such a discursive space for a timely conversation on Muslim women’s pasts and present.

Each of our panels foregrounds the agential capacity of Muslim women in writing themselves and others, as they contend with shifting dynamics of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and caste, within and with relation to South Asia. This symposium hopes to disrupt the essentializing discourse on Muslim women’s identity by exploring the polyphonic nature of human subjectivities.
Discussion topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Narratives of gender, sexuality and queerness Agency and artistic expression in Muslim women
  • Protest, resistance, and activism
  • Nationalism, nation and gender; Partition(s) Space, place and temporality
  • Purdah, privacy and public discourse
  • Marriage, family, and domesticity
  • Technology; social media; cybercrime
  • Sair: narratives of travel, cosmopolitanism and mobility
  • ‘Modern’ Muslim women; self-fashioning in the age of empire
  • Sharif Ladki: reform, education and girlhood
  • Zaat: intersections of caste and gender in South Asian Islam
  • Begumati Zubaan: gender and multilingualism

We invite established academics and early-career/PhD scholars within the fields of humanities and social sciences, and outside of these realms, as well as non-academic voices working on and representing Muslim women’s perspectives with reference to South Asia to present 20-minute papers, mixed-media presentations or any other forms of discussion on or around the above themes. Please send 300 word abstracts/presentation outlines including a short biography of not more than 100 words to tasavvurcollective@gmail.com. The deadline for submission of abstracts is 1st July 2022, and selected participants will be contacted with the final schedule by 15th July 2022. The symposium will be held online via Zoom on 5th-6th August 2022.

Symposium organisers: Fatima Z. Naveed (University of Exeter), Sheelalipi Sahana (University of Edinburgh) and
Zehra Kazmi (University of St. Andrews) of the Tasavvur Collective. Follow us on Twitter: @tasavvurcollect for updates.

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Deadline for Submissions: July 1, 2022

Reimagining #MeToo in South Asia And the Diaspora (Edited Collection of Essays)

Dr. Nidhi Shrivastava

contact email:

shrivastavan@sacredheart.edu

This edited volume seeks to examine how sexual violence and feminist interventions in South Asia and the Diaspora have been articulated in the context of but, more importantly, in opposition to the #MeToo Movement. We seek to understand how the feminist movement has radically diverged from the assimilationist discourse of the #MeToo Movement and, consequently, the Global North. The #MeToo movement has not made an impact at the grassroots level because it is hinged on the victim-survivor to speak up. In an era where the Global North has been a model for influencing change in the Global South, there has been an inconspicuous absence of recognition and impact of the #MeToo Movement. In addition, survivors’ testimonies lie at the center of the #MeToo movement, which demystifies victim-shaming and victim-blaming, legitimizing the survivor’s testimony as the unquestionable truth.

Since 2017, the #MeToo movement has been successful in the conviction of Harvey Weinstein, who was at the center of the landmark trial. The #MeToo has had a significant impact worldwide on how we understand sexual harassment, rape, and gendered violence, especially in the US. However, this global women’s movement has had little reach in South Asia, where access to virtual platforms is limited, and hashtags are still unknown. The #MeToo Movement in South Asia and the Diaspora was taken up briefly by the media and entertainment industry but has failed to make a concrete impact in many ways. This can be attributed to multiple reasons – there are several regionally specific movements, such as the 2009 Pink Chaddi Campaign and 2011 #WhyLoiter campaign, that have been radically popular within the sub-continent.

In the South Asian context, such testimonies are still taboo, which leads to survivors refusing to share and relive their experiences/narratives even if they have the means and access. Therefore, our edited volume seeks to problematize the #MeToo movement in order to reimagine and contextualize it in South Asia and the South Asian diaspora as a much-needed intervention to examine the implications of a transnational feminist movement. We wish to explore questions such as: how the #MeToo movement can move away from Hollywood/Bollywood/workplace and elitist exclusivity. How can it be more inclusive of non-white and marginalized voices?

In light of the ongoing and increasing gender-based violence occurring in South Asia and the diaspora, our edited volume will reflect on these questions as we seek to understand new ways of formulating complex and nuanced gendered subjectivities vis-à-vis the lens of post-colonial feminism and intersectionality. Our focus shifts away from the traditional approaches of victimization to generate dialogue and hopefully create a new platform to break the silence and encourage discomforting narratives to normalize conversations surrounding this pivotal issue.

Themes include but are not limited to the following:

  • Pedagogy and Transformative Learning via #MeToo in the Classroom
  • Queer/LGBTQI+ Spaces within #MeToo
  • New Masculinities
  • Contemporary Gender Movements and Resistances
  • Caste, Gender, Class, and Social Spaces
  • Problematization of #MeToo and ‘Speaking Up’
  • New Modalities of Testimonies
  • Resistance and Digital Feminist Interventions
  • New Feminist Mediations
  • Militarized Feminist Modernities
  • Ageism
  • Viral Videos
  • Censorship, Cultural Production, and Minority Literature
  • Mythologies, Legends, and Sexuality

We welcome informal queries, and potential contributors may submit a 500-750 word abstract and 2 page CV by July 1, 2022. Please direct queries to Dr Nidhi Shrivastava (Sacred Heart University), shrivastavan@sacredheart.edu, Dr Ruma Sinha (Syracuse University), rumas1@gmail.com, and Dr Billie T. Guarino (Jamia Milia Islamia), thoidingjam@gmail.com. Acceptance of the final articles is subject to double-blind peer review. The final deadline for submitting 5,000- 6,000-word articles will be November 15, 2022

Deadline for Proposals June 20, 2022

Autobiography: a matter of geometry?XXI International Symposium of the Scientific Observatoryfor Written, Oral and Iconographic Autobiographical Memory, organized by: Mediapolis.Europa, cultural association http://mediapoliseuropa.com/ and Mnemosyne, o la costruzione del senso, Presses universitaires de Louvain https://pul.uclouvain.be/review/Rome (Italy), 2, 3, 4 November 2022

This call for papers aims to invite proposals that examine the relationship between a subject who narrates him/herself and the spatial dimension. This is not about seeing oneself in space, or casting a glance on space, but presenting oneself through a mental space. The subject can choose an omniscient or a partial vision, can interpose obstacles by asking questions on his/her identity, can find a way of observing him/herself from the outside. This call for papers intends to consider not fictional works but rather autobiographical ones. Under the register of fiction, the category of space has in fact many points of reference that can be inscribed into defined pathways: think of the themes of wandering, nomadic thought, utopia (u-topos: non-place), Foucault’s discourse on heterotopia, Kafka’s vision, and much more. The autobiographical pact, which remains a fixed point, obliges one to take existential responsibility as a single focal point. (Ph. Lejeune, 1975). In archaic Latin, the word existence means exsistere, ex + sistere. According to the Enciclopedia Treccani, in the language of philosophy, it is the state of every reality as it is, or, specifically, the state of a reality that can be the object of a sensory experience. In our case, this means that the subject that recounts his/her own existence chooses a place in which to situate, envision, project, pro-ject him/herself. For those who engage in their own autobiography, the complexity lies in being able to avail of an external eye. In Life of Hernri Brulard, Stendhal writes: “… what eye can see itself?”
At the beginning of the 20th century, the expression biography of self underscores the distancing taken by the writer from him/herself. Dostoevsky talks about self-accounting regarding his novel The Double (1846).
In the past fifty years, many video artists have focused their research on the use of video as an external eye. They have intended to contrast the vision that, beginning from the Renaissance, had wanted to objectivise space; according to Christine Van Assche, the point of view of the spectator [N.B.: stimulated by some work of video art] is no longer the single and unperturbed point of view of the observer of Brunelleschi’s ‘tablet’; it is already perturbed, unstable, moving, but inevitably, physically, psychologically, and intellectually active. Van Assche refers to Rosalind Krauss’ essay The Aesthetics of Narcissism (1976). On this matter, see also issue n. 48 (1988) of Communication. The theme of defining the subject’s mental space is at the heart of a significant part of contemporary art and particularly video art.   The longitude and latitude of the self
‘Super-ego, subconscious, to emerge, to remove’ are words that highlight the subject’s vertical position in space. Psychoanalysis has given prominence to this geometry of the psyche. Freud compares memory to the stratification of Roman excavations, an archaeology of memory (Civilization and Its Discontents [1930]).
The subject’s relationship to space is one of the dominant themes, the very focal point, of existentialism, which, beginning with Kierkegaard, crosses our contemporaneity. In the chapter “The subjective truth, inwardness; truth is subjectivity” in Concluding Unscientific Postscript to the Philosophical Crumbs (2009 [1846]), Kierkegaard places inwardness at the centre, which is a choice, a path, a posture, a centripetal movement. Even supposing an objective reality, to give a meaning to our cosmos, to our cosmoi, everything then returns to subjectivity: “for as Hamlet says, existence and non-existence have only subjective significance.” (2009 [1846], p. 163). The I = I (which comes from Fichte), is a constant in Kierkegaard’s thinking, which connects the subject’s identity to a permanent inward movement.  The Swiss psychiatrist Binswanger (1881-1966), defines Kierkegaard’s conception as ‘passion of inwardness’, meaning that one can assume oneself only beginning from within oneself. As already said, Kierkegaard insists upon the term ‘existence’ by underscoring how the self and only the self is in its isolation, in its being acontextual, it can determine itself by leaving external interferences at the margins. Little by little, Binswanger, a staunch follower of Kirkegaard, will come to Heidegger. Observing patients’ language and behaviour, he examines the “basic forms and perception of human Dasein” (1942), noting the importance of space in the vision that patients have of themselves. Binswanger observes that, in order to describe themselves, patients closely connect bodily sensitivity and affectivity to space. Thus Binswanger orients himself towards a method that he calls Daseinsanalysis, a term that clearly refers to Heiddeger’s Dasein. Heidegger writes: “Space is not in the subject, nor is the world in space. Space is rather ‘in’ the world in so far as space has been disclosed by that Being-in-the-world which is constitutive of Dasein. Space is not to be found in the subject, nor does the subject observe the world ‘as if’ that world were in a space; but the ‘subject’ (Dasein), if well understood ontologically, is spatial.” (Being and Time, 1972 [1927], p.145, Paragraph 24, “Space and Dasein’s Spatiality”). This way of thinking about space will represent a change compared to all previous philosophy, and it will be only the beginning of a series of reflections on the subject-space relationship. Sartre, Merleu-Ponty, Camus will undertake to develop aspects that go beyond Heidegger’s ontological discourse.   The space of the subject in language  In childhood and in pathological psychic states, it is through awareness of space that one manifests oneself. In The Psychology of Intelligence, Jean Piaget explains that space is a primary category of consciousness in children’s thinking (1967).
“To bring back to earth” or “to be over the moon” are expressions of our Dasein, our existence. And even though myths and poetry allow us – through a universalizing metaphorical language – sensations, feelings, psychic experiences, the self nonetheless remains the original subject of what climbs or falls. (L. Binswanger 2012, p. 42). Binswanger, who starts from Heidegger, moves away from the latter’s ontological conception, which is his own, to immerse it in concrete cases. A whole vocabulary situates in space the acts of the patient’s dasein: vertiginous height, climbing, aerial altitude, the infinite, etc. (L. Binswanger 1971, pp. 237-245).   Some linguistic expressions reveal how the self situates itself in the space that it constantly places in relation to his/her own persona.
George Lakoff and Mark Johnson (2003 [1980]), in Metaphors We Live By (see paragraph “The ME-FIRST Orientation”], show how our way of recounting is modelled on a way of thinking in which the concept of up wins over that of down, front always precedes back, and here precedes there (Ibid., pp. 132-133). A whole cultural conception governs these forms of expression, in which the individual regards him/herself as at the epicentre in relation to the surrounding world that he/she modulates.
The order of words was studied by William E. Cooper and John Robert Ross, 1975, World Order.   The subject’s framing of the world  Man frames the world and frames himself in the world.
A metalanguage interprets the subject’s framing of the world, as Lotman writes. In particular, he talks about this in two essays on, respectively, the problem of artistic space in Gogol’s prose and the semiotics of cultural space, 1975 [1968]. The writing on Gogol constitutes an important methodological reference. The extremization of a longitudinal contextualization of existence is described by Borges in a paradoxical manner: “So complex is reality, and so fragmentary and simplified is history, that an omniscient observer could write an indefinite, almost infinite, number of biographies of a man, each emphasizing different facts; we would have to read many of them before we realized that the protagonist was the same”. (1974 [1943]. Borges highlights how, by longitudinally crossing a life, each time choosing only one aspect and ignoring the others, we would find ourself before many parallel lives of a single person. This reflection could be transposed as it is to autobiographical writing. Borges shows how fragile a linear description of existence is. In Lines–A brief history (2007), Tim Ingold calls ‘ghostly lines’ those that derive from abstractions and constitute points of reference in various cultures, especially the Western one. These lines have neither consistency nor colour (as a furrow in agriculture could be, for example). It is especially beginning from Euclid that the idea of the straight line dominates visual perception, from which geometric perspective will derive, which insists on presenting reality in a unidirectional manner. (2007, p. 159). Tim Ingold says that when we look at a starry sky, for example, we define the constellations of the stars by connecting them through abstract lines until we imagine structured figures. (Ibid., p. 49). This is completely normal in our Western vision. Moreover, the conviction that history is evolutionary has generated genealogical trees in which past generations, instead of being brought back to the roots, are placed on the branches. Instead of a lineage as it was in the representation of ancestors in ancient Rome, our Western civilization has created an upward progression, towards the future. (Ibid., pp. 104-109).   Lotman observes how, in the military field, front line is a watchword, an anticipatory geometry. And yet, those who experience war realize the difficulties in finding this vision, this geometry, in concrete experience. In the short autobiography Non-Memoirs (2001 [1994]) on the war years spent on different Soviet fronts, Lotman writes that it is difficult to write about war because only those who have never been to war know what it is. He argues that is like describing a huge space with no precise boundaries and no internal unity, pointing out that there is one war in winter and another in spring; one during retreat and another during defence and offence; one in the day and one at night; one in the infantry, another in the artillery, and a third one in the aviation; one for the soldier and another for the journalist arriving at the front. (Ibid., p. 50-51).
In other words, the meaning that the individual and the community attribute to space is the result of processes of mutual semantization.   Marginalia and opacity  Authors and writers can choose particular habitats to avoid situating themselves and being seen in spaces that are, so to speak, conventional. We consider only two examples: Edgar Allan Poe’s Marginalia and Rousseau’s Confessions as seen by Starobinski in his book La transparence et l’obstacle. At the beginning of Marginalia (1844), Edgar Allan Poe writes: “In getting my books, I have always been solicitous of an ample margin; this not so much through any love of the thing in itself, however agreeable, as for the facility it affords me of pencilling suggested thoughts, agreements and differences of opinion, or brief critical comments in general.” And further on: “In the marginalia, too, we talk only to ourselves; we therefore talk freshly – boldly – originally – with abandonment – without conceit”. [Bold is ours].
To put events into perspective also means to omit, to put aside spaces and aspects of one’s own life. Just as Starobinski highlights regarding Rousseau’s Confessions. It is possible to play with transparency (to see everything) and the obstacle. Starobinski calls this strategy Poppaea’s veil. Tacitus writes about Poppaea: “Her conversation was charming and her wit anything but dull. She professed virtue, while she practised laxity. Seldom did she appear in public, and it was always with her face partly veiled, either to disappoint men’s gaze or to set off her beauty.” Annals XIII, 45. Poppaea did not want to conceal herself, she wanted to be glimpsed. A painting by an unknown artist from the School of Fontainebleau (1550-1560), in the MAH Musée d’art et d’histoire, Geneva, 1839, shows Sabina Poppaea wrapped in gauze, in a falsely modest pose. Starobinski wrote a long introduction to L’oeil vivant (1961), “Le voile de Poppée”, in which he argues that it is possible to intentionally interpose obstacles to the space of communication with the other, pointing out that that which is hidden is the other face of a presence. He asserts that Poppaea’s veil, which is both an obstacle and an interposed sign, generates an alienated perfection that, through her own escape, demands to be retrieved through our desire. By virtue of the interdiction posed by the obstacle, he continues, there appears a whole depth that passes as essential. He goes on to argue that fascination emanates from a real presence that forces us to prefer what she dissimulates, the remoteness that she prevents us from understanding, at the very moment in which she offers herself. (Ibid., p. 10).
Starobinski’s subtle analysis takes into account our mental spaces, how they are constructed. Another important aspect concerns the influence on the construction of mental space due to circumstances less strictly subjective, so to speak: Foucault’s analysis of heterotopia (see Conference, 14 May 1967, Paris); the writings of Deleuze and Guattari on the concept of deterritorialization (1975) – ideas that allows us to understand the incidence of culture on the way of individually conceiving space.
In conclusion: if for Kierkegaard, come what may, introspection will never be a matter of geography, yet we know that conceiving oneself in space is certainly different for an American Indian, or an Eskimo, or a New Yorker. As Henri Lefèvre’s studies indicate, mental space does not correspond to either knowledge in space, or on space; that is, mental space is not external to the subject (1968). And yet, this individuality of mental space, as Lefèvre illustrates, is the long-term result of our interaction with the world and exposure to the universe, to the semiosphere, in which we find ourself living.   Bibliographic references  -Beatrice Barbalato, 2018, “Le ‘FRONT’ sémantique de Non-memorie de Lotman”, 61-77. in (ed.) Cathérine Gravet, and al., with Serge Deruette, Pierre Gillis, Katherine Rondou, Cahiers Internationaux de Symbolisme, n. 149-150-151.
-Raymond Bellour, Anne Marie Duguet, (dir.), 1988, Vidéo, Communication n. 48.
-Ludwig Binswanger, 1942, Grundformen und Erkenntnis menschliche Daseins, Zurich, Niehans.
Introduction à l’analyse existentielle, 1971, translated from the German by J. Verdeaux and Roland Kuhn, preface by R. Kuhn and Henri Maldiney.
Rêve et existence, 2012 [1930], translation and introduction by Françoise Dastur, afterword by E. Basso, Paris, Vrin.
-Caterina Borelli, 2018, «The House He Built : autobiografia in una casa», in B. Barbalato (dir.), Auto/biographie, polyphonie, plurivocalité, Mnemosyne n. 11, PuL, Presses universitaires de Louvain.
https://ojs.uclouvain.be/index.php/Mnemosyne/article/view/14123
-Jorge Luis Borges, “On William Beckford’s Vathek” [1943]
https://www.gwern.net/docs/borges/1943-borges-onwilliambeckfordsvathek.pdf
-William Cooper and John Robert Ross, 1975, “World order”, pp. 63–111, R. E. Grossman and al. (eds.), Papers from the parasession on functionalism, Chicago, Chicago Linguistic Society. -Gilles Deleuze, Félix Guattari 1975, Capitalisme et schizophrénie-L’AntiOedipe, v. I, Parigi, Éditions du Minuit.
-Michel Foucault 2004 [1967], Des espaces autres, 12-19, Érès “Empan” 2004/2, n. 54.
-Sigmund Freud, first published in 1930, Civilization and Its Discontents, translation by James Strachey, https://www.stephenhicks.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/FreudS-CIVILIZATION-AND-ITS-DISCONTENTS-text-final.pdf
-Martin Heidegger, 1972 [1927], Being and Time, translated by John Macquarrie and Edward Robinson, Oxford, Blackwell Publishers Ltd. -Tim Ingold 2007, Lines – A brief history, London-New York, Routledge.
https://taskscape.files.wordpress.com/2011/03/lines-a-brief-history.pdf
-Søren Kierkegaard, 2009 [1847], “The subjective truth, inwardness; truth is subjectivity,” p. 163, in Conclusive Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Crumbs, edited and translated by Alistair Hannay, Cambridge University Press.
-Rosalind Krauss 1976, The Aesthetics of Narcissism, Cambridge. -Georges Lakoff, Mark Johnson, 2003 [1980], Metaphors We Live By, Chicago-London, The University of Chicago Press.
-Henri Lefèvre, 1974, La production de l’espace, Paris, Anthropos.
-Philippe Lejeune, Le pacte autobiographique, Paris, Seuil, 1975.
-Yuri M. Lotman, 1975 [1968], “Semiotica dello spazio culturale”, 143-248, “Il problema dello spazio artistico in Gogol”, 193-248, translated by Sergio Molinari, in J. M. Lotman and Boris A. Uspenskij, Tipologia della cultura, edited by Remo Faccani and Marzio Marzaduri, translated from the Russian into Italian by Manila Barbato Faccani, Remo Faccani, Marzio Marzaduri, Sergio Molinari, Milano, Bompiani. -, 2001 [1994], Non-Memorie, Silvia Burini and Alessandro Niero (edited and translated), introduction by Maria Corti, Novara, Interlinea. Original Russian text “Ne-memuary”, 1994, in Lotmanovskij sbornik, I-C-Garant, Moscow.
-Jean Piaget, “L’élaboration de la pensée”, pp. 129-165, in Ibid., La psychologie de l’intelligence, Paris, Colin, 1967.
-Edgar Allan Poe, «Marginalia part I», 1844-1849, United States Magazine and Democratic Review, November 1844. http://pinkmonkey.com/dl/library1/marg.pdf
-Tacitus, Annals, from Tacitus, Complete Works of Tacitus, Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb, Sara Bryant, edited for Perseus, New York. Random House, Inc., reprinted 1942.
https://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.02.0078%3Abook%3D13%3Achapter%3D45
-Christine Van Assche 1992, Une histoire de vidéo, introduction to the catalogue of Musée d’Art moderne du Centre Pompidou, Vidéo et après, Paris, Éditions Carré.   Scientific Committee
Beatrice BARBALATO, Mediapolis.Europa  May CHEHAB, Université de Chypre
Fabio CISMONDI, Euro Fusion
Antonio CASTILLO GÓMEZ, Univ. d’Alcalà de Henares
Françoise HIRAUX, Univ. cath. de Louvain
Giulia PELILLO-HESTERMEYER, Universität Heidelberg
Anna TYLUSIŃSKA-KOWALSKA, Uniwersytet Warszawski
Organization
Irene MELICIANI, managing director Mediapolis.Europa   Symposium – Rome 2, 3, 4 November 2022Autobiography: a matter of geometry?Enrolments LANGUAGES ADMITTED FOR THE INTERVENTIONS: English, French, Italian, Spanish. Every speaker will speak in their chosen language; there will be no simultaneous translation. A rough passive understanding would be desirable.
A) The deadline for the submission of papers is 20 June 2022. Candidates are asked to present an abstract of up to 250 words, with citation of two reference texts, and a brief curriculum vitae of up to 100 words, with possible mention of two publications, be they articles or books. These must be submitted online on the conference registration page of the http://mediapoliseuropa.com/ Website.
The scientific committee will read and select every proposal that will be sent to the conference registration page of the http://mediapoliseuropa.com/ Website. For information, please contact the following: beatrice.barbalato@gmail.com,
irenemeliciani@gmail.com.
Notification of the accepted proposals will be given on 30 June 2022.   B) In regard to enrolment in the colloquium, once the proposal is accepted the fees are the following:
Before 30 July 2022: 110,00€
From 1 to 30 August 2022: 130,00€
Enrolment cannot be accepted in loco.
Ph.D. students:
Before 30 July 2022: 75,00€
From 1 to 30 August 2022: 90,00€
Enrolment cannot be accepted in loco.
Participation only 30,00 €   Virtual: All conference activities will be available through our webinar format. You will receive the conference link through the email address you provide in your registration.
A) For information on registration fees, past symposia, the association’s activities, and the organising and scientific teams, please refer to our website:  http://mediapoliseuropa.com/
The association Mediapolis.Europa contributes to the publication of the journal Mnemosyne, o la costruzione del senso, Presses universitaires de Louvain, www.i6doc.com.
Indexed as a scientific journal in: https://dbh.nsd.uib.no/publiseringskanaler/erihplus/periodical/info?id=488665

Deadline for Application June 15, 2022

Vacancy for PhD researcher: “Broadcast Biographies. Innovations in Genre and Medium (1945-2020)”

by Birgit Van Puymbroeck

The Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Faculty of Languages and Humanities, Department of Linguistics and Literary Studies, is looking for a four-year full-time PhD researcher in the field of literary studies as part of the FWO funded research project “Broadcast Biographies. Innovations in Genre and Medium (1945-2020)”.

1. Project

This project is situated at the intersection of life writing, literary radio studies and cultural memory studies. It examines the literary radio biography in Britain and (West-)Germany in the period 1945-2020 along three complementary lines: its production and reception history, its genre and media conventions and its cultural memory function. Despite the rich history of biographical writing on and for radio, little research exists on the radio biography as genre, let alone on its role as a potential catalyst for genre and media innovation. Neither the vast scholarship on life writing nor the field of radio studies have paid systematic attention to biographies created specifically for radio. Still, as this project aims to show, the radio biography gives us a unique insight in the ongoing mediation of life narratives and the history of radio itself. By writing lives for the radio, literary authors such as Alfred Andersch, Martin Esslin, Gerhard Rühm, Angela Carter and Tom Stoppard also chronicle the life of radio itself, reflecting on the possibilities and limits of both genre and medium.

In this project, we mainly focus on productions by (post)modernist and neo-avant-garde authors. We aim to study the genre and function of the broadcast biography, including its role in the transnational exchange between the two central national broadcasting cultures in this project.

2. Position

We offer a four-year full-time PhD position (subject to annual positive evaluation). The successful candidate will carry out the project as a doctoral researcher in close collaboration with the two supervisors at the Centre for Literary and Intermedial Crossing (CLIC) at VUB (https://clic.research.vub.be/en/home). The candidate will write a doctoral dissertation on the subject of the radio biography, carry out archival work on selected authors and productions (in the UK and Germany), (co-)publish the results of the research in academic articles and books, present at national and international conferences and co-host scientific meetings. The candidate will complete the doctoral training programme of the Faculty of Arts and Humanities at VUB (https://student.vub.be/en/phd/doctoral-training#doctoral-schools) and is expected to defend their doctoral dissertation in 2026. Please be aware that the position requires you to be present in the department on a regular basis (3 days per week).

3. Profile

  • You hold a master’s degree in (literature in) English, (literature in) German, comparative literature (or a comparable degree) or you will have obtained this by the start date of this position.
  • You demonstrate excellent study results. Previous academic experience (publications, conference presentations, etc.) will be considered an asset.
  • You have a demonstrable interest in twentieth-century and/or contemporary literature, life writing, biography studies, literary radio studies, sound studies, media history or cultural memory studies. Previous experience with archival research will be considered an asset.
  • You are an enthusiastic researcher, capable of conducting research both independently and in team.
  • You are willing to conduct research stays abroad in function of archival research and knowledge exchange.
  • You act in accordance with the rules regarding scientific integrity, as described in the VUB charter for researchers: https://www.vub.be/en/violations-of-scientific-integrityinbreuken-op-wetenschappelijke-integriteit#information-in-english`
  • You have excellent academic English-language skills (oral and written). A good command of the German language is highly desirable.

4. Offer

  • We offer a four-year full-time doctoral position (requiring enrolment as a doctoral student at VUB), subject to an annual positive evaluation.
  • The planned starting date is 1 September 2022, or as soon as possible thereafter.
  • You will receive a salary in one of the grades defined by the Belgian government. Depending on previous professional experience, the monthly tax-free salary varies from approx. € 2541 to max. € 2704 (EU staff) / approx. € 2318 to max. € 2466 (non-EU staff). In addition, you are provided with a shared office space and work laptop, library access, social and health benefits, and free access to Belgian public transport for your commute to campus.
  • As an employee of VUB, you will work in a dynamic, diverse, and multilingual environment. For this function, VUB’s Brussels Humanities, Sciences & Engineering Campus (Etterbeek) will serve as your home base. Our campus is a green oasis in the capital city of Flanders, Belgium, and Europe, and has an excellent restaurant and extensive sport facilities. It is within easy reach (twenty minutes by public transport) of the city centre of Brussels and has a direct train connection to Brussels National Airport. Childcare facilities are to be found within walking distance.
  • For more information on what it is like to work at VUB, go to www.vub.ac.be/en/jobs.

5. Application procedure

Applications should include (in one PDF file):

(1) a cover/motivation letter;

(2) your academic CV with details about your bachelor and master qualifications (including grades) and your previous academic experience (if applicable);

(3) a short text on how you envisage your contribution to the project, especially the doctoral dissertation that you would be working on (max. 1000 words). Please mention your approach, research question and potential cases;

(4) the names of two referees.

Also include (in a separate PDF file) a writing sample (e.g. your MA thesis, a research paper or academic article). Clearly mention your name on your writing sample.

Please send your application by e-mail to both supervisors, Prof. dr. Inge Arteel (Inge.Arteel@vub.be) and Prof. dr. Birgit Van Puymbroeck (birgit.van.puymbroeck@vub.be). The deadline is 15 June 2022 (midnight, CET). Shortlisted candidates will be interviewed in the week of 4 July 2022 on the Humanities Campus of Vrije Universiteit Brussel or online.

If you have any questions, please contact Inge.Arteel@vub.be or birgit.van.puymbroeck@vub.be.

Deadline for Submissions June 15, 2022

Call for Book Chapters: “Narrative medicine: trauma and ethics”

Deadline: June 15, 2022

Vernon Press invites book chapter proposals to be included in a forthcoming scholarly volume on “Narrative medicine: trauma and ethics” edited by associate professor Anders Juhl Rasmussen and professor, MD, Morten Sodemann, University of Southern Denmark.

Narrative medicine is a scholarly discipline based on narrative theory, close reading, phenomenological inquiry, and creative writing that fortifies clinical practices of all health disciplines with ways to honor the stories of people who seek and give care. Narrative medicine was created at Columbia University in 2000, and through partnerships the field has giving rise to narrative medicine courses worldwide that give students and clinicians the opportunity to read, write, and reflect on clinical experiences. In recent years, new art-based intervention studies with patients have evolved under the same heading as “system narrative medicine”.

Narrative ethics was introduced in the 1990’s, and shared decision making in ethical dilemmas will always have a crucial role in narrative medicine. This book seeks to ask broad questions about how traumas are narrated and known, how they are conceived in society trough art and treated in the health care system by methods of narrative medicine. These kinds of trauma could be adverse childhood events, sexual abuse, natural disasters, or trauma related to armed conflict, terrorism, persecution, etc.

We welcome proposals that are interdisciplinary in nature and can come from disciplines that include literary studies, cultural studies, media studies, anthropology, psychology, psychoanalysis, history, philosophy, sociology, etc. We seek book chapters that range from approximately 5000-6000 words in length to include in this edited collection.

We invite chapter proposals that explore a wide variety of topics such as:

– to what extend can traumatic events be narrated, known, and measured?

– how does narratives in art shape commonly held beliefs in society about e.g. rape trauma?

– how may clinicians learn to ethically encounter trauma patients through literature?

– could an adoption of Trauma Informed Care practices supplement narrative medicine?

– how can art-based intervention studies address shared decision making with trauma patients, e.g. in ethical dilemmas?

– in which way can creative/expressive writing and close/shared reading help patients heal or repair from trauma?

Please send a 300-word abstract, project title, and a brief bio in English to Anders Juhl Rasmussen and Morten Sodemann (Volume Editors) at: ajr@sdu.dk and msodemann@health.du.dk  by June 15, 2022.

Contact Info:

Anders Juhl Rasmussen and Morten Sodemann (Volume Editors) at ajr@sdu.dk and msodemann@health.du.dk

Contact Email:

ajr@sdu.dk

Deadline for Submissions–between March 1 and June 1, 2022

Dear colleagues,   We are pleased to announce the call for papers to the dossier The auto/biographical space in university culture and extension, of the Revista UFG.
Revista UFG is an international refereed journal based on the Federal University of Goiás, in Brazil, aimed at diffusion studies on different areas of knowledge applied to social practices, focusing on culture and extension at universities. Revista UFG welcomes article manuscripts, reviews, and visual essays submissions from all fields, including works from multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary areas.   The present call for papers departs from a critical-reflective movement that permeated many university practices since the pandemics, raising questions about individuals, groups, and institutions’ roles in teaching, research, and culture connected to communities beyond the academy. Creating spaces for active listening and sharing stories at the university has become essential in searching for innovative solutions and transformative narratives that may contribute to social justice and change beyond the university’s walls. This dossier welcomes reflections and expressions that stimulate the imagination about possible futures for post-pandemic university practices. We encourage texts departing from what we have learned so far, considering subjectivities, perceptions, and life stories that may point out other ways of doing and being in/with the world.   >> Submissions: from 1st March to 1st June 2022 >> Modalities: Articles, Essays, Reviews, Visual Essays >> Guidelines for submissions: https://www.revistas.ufg.br/revistaufg/about/submissions (please, on the website, click on the options on the right-side column for accessing translated content in English, Spanish or Portuguese).   If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us. We look forward to receiving your submissions.

Best,

Manoela dos Anjos Afonso Rodrigues – UFG (manoelaafonso@ufg.br)

Cláudia Mariza Mattos Brandão – UFPel (claummattos@gmail.com)

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ReStorying Ageing: Older Women and Life Writing

May 24th, 2-6pm (Irish time; GMT+1), via Zoom (Booking link below)

This webinar brings together researchers, writers and the public as part of the Bealtaine Festival 2022. Through presentations, discussions and readings, the online event will explore the empowering potential of women’s creativity and life writing, and the importance of recognising the diversity of women’s experiences as they grow older, experiences which are so often stereotyped in literature and culture.

Speakers: Ashton Applewhite, Prof. Molly Andrews, Dr Mary McGill, Éilís Ní Dhuibhne, Dr Áine Ní Léime, Helen O’Rahilly, & participants from a life writing workshop for women aged 50 and older.

Organisers: Dr Michaela Schrage-Frueh (School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures, NUI Galway), Dr Maggie O’Neill (Irish Centre for Social Gerontology, NUI Galway) and Karen Hanrahan (University of Brighton / Moore Institute), in partnership with Age & Opportunity and with funding from the Irish Research Council.

Attendance is free but booking is essential: https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/restorying-ageing-older-women-and-life-writing-tickets-311983570257

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In the Spaces Provided: Career Narratives and Academic Womanhood

Advance Contract: Routledge Press, Series in Auto/biography Studies

Deadline for abstract: June 1st, 2022

Contact: ortiz@tcnj.edu

In her introduction to Essays in Life Writing, Marlene Kadar suggests that self-expressive life writing can invite readers into the overwhelming “too muchness” of the subject’s life.[i] Career construction specialist, Larry Cochrane finds that the more functional career narrative minimizes the life story that individuals “may want and need to tell” in favor of articulating and promoting an academic brand. As Cochran quips, scholars must leave out “all that would captivate us in a good autobiography.”[ii] Ultimately, these two forms of self-representation are made to face opposite directions and academics are socialized to believe that these genres cannot trust one another. This thinking is more harmful than helpful for women academics who stand to benefit from inserting themselves into their work as a means to transform the historically male-defined terms upon which their disciplines and the profession at large have been built. As Alison Black rightly asserts of career narratives, “There is a richness to [women’s] individual experiences and stories that must not be reduced. From these can emerge a collective vision that speaks to our individual, emotional and embodied lives – lives which the neoliberal university too oft deems insignificant”[iii]

In the Spaces Provided is an edited collection of auto-theoretical essays by women life writing scholars who explore their early-career, mid-career, late-career, and “alt-career” experiences with the documents that shape their professional careers: the institutional auto/biography of employment letters, curriculum vitae, tenure portfolios, promotion dossiers, professional bios, academic website profiles, and other self-authored narratives required by institutions to self-promote for opportunities and resources.
I am seeking a diverse range of expert considerations of how life writing theory and practice enable our thinking about access to the highly regulated spaces of self-construction in academic career documentation. Contributors are invited to turn the lenses of life writing theory and methodology inward as self-aware subjects negotiating frameworks for writing and reviewing self-authored academic career documents. I encourage contributions that model a range of theoretical moves for exposing and subverting the traps of self-representation the repressive norms of professional review in which explorations of personhood – including experiences of gender, ability, sexuality, age, nationhood, race, and class – are inhibited.
I invite contributions attuned to engagements with:


[i] Kadar, Marlene. Essays on Life Writing: From Genre to Critical Practice. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1992, 4.

[ii] Cochran, Larry R. “Narrative as a Paradigm for Career Research.” Methodological Approaches to the Study of Career, Richard A. Young and William Borgen, eds., New York: Praeger. 1990, 71-86.

[iii] Black, Alison, “Women Activating Agency in Academia: Metaphors, Manifestos and Memoir, Alison L. Black and Susanne Garvis, eds., New York: Routledge, 25.

Dr. Lisa Ortiz-Vilarelle

[Pronouns: she/her/hers]

Professor of English, The College of New Jersey

Fulbright Research Chair in Society and Culture, Univ of Alberta, 2021-22

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Call for Papers

Reading old age, the ageing body and memory in British and American literature and texts of culture

Special Issue, The Polish Journal of English Studies

Deadline for Submissions, June 1, 2022

Age studies point to all life stages as culturally and historically idiosyncratic, and complicated even more by various intersectional perspectives. Within this age(s)-focused field of analysis, humanistic and critical gerontologists as well as historians of old age issued an ardent call to redefine old age as equally ephemeral and multi-layered as any other life stage. Addressing the existing studies of the formative and foundational quality of youth and adulthood, gerontologists of various subdisciplines objected to seeing old age as simply the end of life, and to defining it as a precise point in time rather than a nebulous period with no exact opening temporal bracket. Thane (2000) in particular stressed the difficulty in defining old age in term of chronology only, proposing to view it as a functional and cultural category as well. More precisely, scholars noted, one is sooner made (to feel) old by culture and society than one perceives oneself as being such. Consequently, even if it is an essentially intimate and embodied lived experience, old age must be seen as an experience with a set of socio-cultural prescriptive and proscriptive rules of conduct and decorum as well as social sanctions and rewards.
Addressing all of said emerging conceptual recalibrations, Gullette claimed that indeed age “could be the next analytic and hermeneutic concept to make cutting-edge difference” (2004: 106) in humanist research. . Having specifically worked on middle and old age in her research, she further noted that, just like with other necessary intersectionalities, to talk about ageing is to keep unravelling and disentangling “the din of representations, unseen internalizations, [and] unthinking practices” (Gullette 2004: 27). Old age can then be seen as simultaneously ”the culmination or the dreary denouement of life’s drama” (Cole 2006: xx), written as somatic and mental narratives of decline (Gullette 1997) as well as the most meaningful moment of human existence, “a time for recapitulating, connecting part to part, re-membering” (Carson 1987: xii), leading to wisdom only allowed to the members of this in-group. From such a dialectic other questions are engendered: Do we with age become the embodied repositories of knowledge and guardians of traditions? Do we need to properly perform old age as the various gerontideologies socialize us to do (Mangan 2013)? Are we our ageing bodies? How do our auto/self-narratives change with age? Can we “read the beginning in the end and the end in the beginning” (Baars 2016: 82)?

This themed volume aims to critically address and further identify the meaning(s) behind and potentialities of old age and ageing. As growing and/or being old are not only subjective and embodied experiences but also socio-cultural phenomena, the points of departure in this collection are the three fundamentals in gerontological research: 1) old age, 2) the (ageing) body and 3) memory, the latter understood not only as recollecting one’s spatio-temporal past but, in particular, re-membering one’s somatic “past-ness”. Such intertwining of old age with memory inevitably invites studies of nostalgia, seen as both positive and negative approaches to and perceptions of one’s embodied past. We thus welcome papers that engage in age and gerontological readings within British and American literature and paraliterary texts of culture (i.e. ego-documents, conduct texts, philosophical tracts, etc.) across all historical periods. Book reviews within the field of literary age  studies or literary gerontology are welcome as well.

Please send a 150-200-word abstract (titled Surname_PJES_Old age) together with a short biographical note to  Dr Katarzyna Bronk-Bacon at kbronkk@amu.edu.pl The deadline for submission of abstracts is 1st June 2022. Notifications about proposal acceptance will be sent by 20th June 2022. The deadline for submission of completed papers is 1st November 2022. Planned publication: 2023.

Bibliography

Baars, Jan. 2016. “Concepts of age and aging”, in Geoffrey Scarre (ed.), The Palgrave handbook of the philosophy of aging (London: Palgrave Macmillan), 69-86.
Carson, Ronald A. 1987. ‘Foreword’, in Thomas R. Cole and Sally Gadow (eds.), What does it mean to grow old? Reflections from the humanities. Durham: Duke UP, xi–xiv.
Cole, Thomas R. 2006. The journey of life: A cultural history of aging in America. Cambridge: CUP.
Gullette, Margaret M. Declining to decline: Cultural combat and the politics of the midlife.
Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 1997.
Gullette, Margaret M. 2004. Aged by culture. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Cole, Thomas R., and Sally Gadow, eds. What does it mean to grown old? Reflections from the humanities. Durham: Duke UP, 1987.
Mangan, Michael. Staging ageing: Theatre, performance, and the narrative of decline. Bristol: Intellect, 2013.

Contact Info:

dr Katarzyna Bronk-Bacon

Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland

Contact Email:

kbronkk@amu.edu.pl

URL:

http://pjes.edu.pl/issues/9-2-2023/

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Call for Proposals: The Routledge Companion to Latinx Life Writing

Extended Deadline for Submissions June 3, 2022

Contributions are invited for consideration to be published in a collection of critical essays introducing readers to studies of Latinx life writing, a prominent and essential pan-genre within Latinx literature since Latinx literature began to be conceived as such. Life writing is a broad umbrella term that encompasses a number of genres in which authors take life and lived experience as their core subject. Within Latinx life writing, these genres include memoir, autobiography, and testimonio most centrally. The proposed handbook provides literary criticism of Latinx life writing focusing on its history, key themes and questions, and genres. The handbook will feature chapters on the trends and concerns of Latinx life writers across different historical periods, providing insight into various thematic and generic concerns as they evolve throughout Latinx cultural production.  Although this book is scholarly in nature, the tone will be broadly accessible in order to make the book suitable for a wide audience including graduate students, undergraduate students in community colleges and four-year universities, and classroom instructors.

THE ROUTLEDGE COMPANION TO LATINX LIFE WRITING is under contract with Routledge and is scheduled to be published in 2024.

Please note that we are seeking essays of literary criticism; we are not seeking creative works of Latinx life writing at this time. We are seeking proposals specifically in the following areas:

  • 19th century and U.S. occupation narratives (oral histories-narratives, correspondence, memories, diaries)
  • Crónica, relatos, testimonios
  • Fictionalized autobiographies/life writing in fiction/plays
  • Corridos, folklore, oral forms
  • Correspondence (in wartime or Latino veterans or because of family separation, etc.)
  • Poetry of protest
  • Coming of age autobiographical narratives
  • Experimental autobiographical works
  • Education testimonios
  • Chicana and Latina “Third World” women of color feminist mixed genre writing
  • Autobiographical narratives of exile
  • LGBTQ+/Queer articulations
  • Testimonios and new media (Digital Humanities, digital storytelling)
  • Grief, trauma narratives
  • Graphic narratives
  • Undocumented narrative

We are seeking only original, never before published work at this time. Please submit a no more than two page abstract (approximately 500 words) of a chapter that you wish to be considered for this handbook by June 3, 2022 (the deadline has been extended), as well as a 2 page abbreviated curriculum vitae.

Contact Info:

For more information, contact co-editors Dr. Maria Joaquina Villaseñor, mvillasenor@csumb.edu or Dr. Christine Fernandez, chrfernandez@csumb.edu

Contact Email:

mvillasenor@csumb.edu

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Dear IABA List Members,
 
We would like to let you know that the deadline for the call for entries into Biography’s annual annotated bibliography has been extended to Monday, May 15. Please see below for information on submission guidelines.
 
Biography’s annual annotated bibliography of critical and theoretical works on life writing is the most extensive reference of its kind, and before finalizing it, we want to make sure it is as timely, inclusive, and extensive as possible.
 
So if last year (from January to December 2021) you published, edited, or co-edited a book, wrote an article for a journal or an essay for an edited collection, or completed your doctoral dissertation, we would appreciate having that information, so that we can incorporate it into the list. (There is of course a very good chance that we have already included it, but this will make sure your work is noted.)
 
We would request the following information:
 
·      Full bibliographic information for each text, formatted according to MLA 9 style
·      A one-sentence annotation per text
 
We are especially committed to noting publications in languages other than English. If you could provide an annotation in English, however, that would be helpful.
 
We would appreciate getting the information by Monday, May 15. Please send your information to Zoë Sprott (gabiog@hawaii.edu).
 
Thanks in advance. This bibliography usually has between 1,400 and 1,500 entries, and represents the most extensive annual critical survey of the field. We want to make sure your work appears within it.
 
Zoë E. Sprott (she/her/hers)
Editorial Assistant and Reviews Editor
The Center for Biographical Research
Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly
1960 East-West Road
Biomed B104
Honolulu, HI 96822
Tel: (808) 956-3774
Email: gabiog@aikoy

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Autobiography Panel, 119th Annual PAMLA Conference

119th Annual Pacific Ancient and Modern Languages Association Conference

Friday, November 11, 2022 to Sunday, November 13, 2022
UCLA Luskin Conference Center and Hotel in Los Angeles, California
Hosted by the University of California, Los Angeles

Deadline for Submissions, May 15, 2022

PAMLA’s Autobiography panel is currently accepting submissions for in-person sessions!

“Autobiography creates a self as the right instrument to seek meaning.”

-Patricia Hampl

We are open to a wide range of papers which explore auto/biographical constructions of the self across genres, geographies, and modes. We are especially interested in papers attuned to the conference theme, “Geographies of the Fantastic and the Quotidian,” and welcome proposals which regard auto/biographical expression as a mode for mapping geographies within and around the self. In what ways do fantastic and quotidian places and spaces inform identity? How are place and space represented in auto/biographical texts? How might auto/biographical texts shape audience understandings of and orientations to particular places? How might auto/biographical representations of those places impact their physical geographies in material ways?

We encourage presenters to explore auto/biography through interdisciplinary approaches, such as affect studies and cognitive science, theories of the archive and archival sciences, area studies, critical race theory, digital humanities, feminist and theories of gender, genre studies, materialism, media studies, queer theory, phenomenology, post- and decolonial studies, psychology, translation and adaptation studies, and more. Possible genres and topics could include but are not limited to: autofiction and biofiction, autotheory, collective autobiography, conquest and encounter narratives, diaries, documentary film, glitch feminism, intersectional subjectivity, lyric essays, maps, memoir, pedagogical applications for life writing, photography, social media, and other techniques of self-narration and self-fashioning.

Submit an abstract directly through the Autobiography panel submission page, or search the PAMLA comprehensive Call for Papers. Contact Emily Travis (etravis@ucsc.edu) with any questions.

About PAMLA and this year’s theme:

The Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association is a scholarly association designed for those teaching or conducting research in a diverse range of literary, linguistic, and cultural interests, both ancient and modern, in the United States and abroad. PAMLA members include faculty and students in language and literature departments in colleges and universities, as well as interdisciplinary scholars from other disciplines and independent scholars.

This year’s theme, “Geographies of the Fantastic and the Quotidian,” invites scholars to consider the overdetermined landscapes both of the imagination and of everyday experience. Particularly fascinating might be explorations of the extraordinary, the exemplary, the “out of this world” sorts of places, real and figurative: the spaces of the fantastic and the bizarre. Conversely, the lived and experienced environments of the banal might spark equally fertile archaeologies of the everyday. For that is the allure of the often inscrutable or illegible cities of the imagination: they open up new territories

Contact Info:

Emily Travis, UC Santa Cruz

Contact Email:
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Call for Contributions

Edited Collection:

In the Spaces Provided: Career Narratives and Academic Womanhood

Advance Contract: Routledge Press, Series in Auto/biography Studies

Deadline for abstract: May 15th, 2022

Contact: ortiz@tcnj.edu

In her introduction to Essays in Life Writing, Marlene Kadar suggests that self-expressive life writing can invite readers into the overwhelming “too muchness” of the subject’s life.[i] Career construction specialist, Larry Cochrane finds that the more functional career narrative minimizes the life story that individuals “may want and need to tell” in favor of articulating and promoting an academic brand. As Cochran quips, scholars must leave out “all that would captivate us in a good autobiography.”[ii] Ultimately, these two forms of self-representation are made to face opposite directions and academics are socialized to believe that these genres cannot trust one another. This thinking is more harmful than helpful for women academics who stand to benefit from inserting themselves into their work as a means to transform the historically male-defined terms upon which their disciplines and the profession at large have been built. As Alison Black rightly asserts of career narratives, “There is a richness to [women’s] individual experiences and stories that must not be reduced. From these can emerge a collective vision that speaks to our individual, emotional and embodied lives – lives which the neoliberal university too oft deems insignificant”[iii]

In the Spaces Provided is an edited collection of auto-theoretical essays by women life writing scholars who explore their early-career, mid-career, late-career, and “alt-career” experiences with the documents that shape their professional careers: the institutional auto/biography of employment letters, curriculum vitae, tenure portfolios, promotion dossiers, professional bios, academic website profiles, and other self-authored narratives required by institutions to self-promote for opportunities and resources.
I am seeking a diverse range of expert considerations of how life writing theory and practice enable our thinking about access to the highly regulated spaces of self-construction in academic career documentation. Contributors are invited to turn the lenses of life writing theory and methodology inward as self-aware subjects negotiating frameworks for writing and reviewing self-authored academic career documents. I encourage contributions that model a range of theoretical moves for exposing and subverting the traps of self-representation the repressive norms of professional review in which explorations of personhood – including experiences of gender, ability, sexuality, age, nationhood, race, and class – are inhibited.

I invite contributions attuned to engagements with:

* Social justice approaches to hiring, tenure, and promotion
* Tools, practices, and policies of career self-documentation
* Paradoxes of privacy and disclosure
* Parenthood and career expectations
* Decolonizing, anti-racist, and anti-sexist career affiliations
* Ableist expectations of academic success
* Mentoring and career narratives
* Visibility, intelligibility, and embodiment
* Approaches to racial, indigenous, and cultural identity
* Social networking and “new media
* Digital modalities for academic career review
* Retirement and late-career perspectives on career construction
* Alt-academic transitions
* Contingent and transient academic posts
* Career mobility and representations of movement
* Academic career coaching
* Comparative experiences in transnational contexts
* Revealing and concealing LGBTQ personhood
* Self-promotion and Self-advocacy in academic institutions
* Straddling teaching, administration, service, and scholarship

Please send a brief abstract (300 words) and a brief biographical statement (100 words) to Lisa Ortiz-Vilarelle (ortiz@tcnj.edu) by May 15th, 2022. 
Those invited to submit full essays will be notified by June 1st, 2022. Completed contributions (6,500-8,000 words including notes and bibliography) will be due October 1st, 2022.

About the editor: Lisa Ortiz-Vilarelle is Professor of English at The College of New Jersey. She is author of Américanas, Autocracy, and Autobiographical Innovation Overwriting the Dictator (Routledge, 2020). Other work appears in Biography: An Interdsciplinary QuarterlyEuropean Journal of Life Writinga/b: Auto/Biography Studies, and Life Writing. She serves as book review editor for a/b: Auto/Biography Studies and is a 2021-22 Fulbright Research Chair in Arts and Humanities at the University of Alberta in E


[i] Kadar, Marlene. Essays on Life Writing: From Genre to Critical Practice. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1992, 4.
[ii] Cochran, Larry R. “Narrative as a Paradigm for Career Research.” Methodological Approaches to the Study of Career, Richard A. Young and William Borgen, eds., New York: Praeger. 1990, 71-86.
[iii] Black, Alison, “Women Activating Agency in Academia: Metaphors, Manifestos and Memoir, Alison L. Black and Susanne Garvis, eds., New York: Routledge, 25.
Dr. Lisa Ortiz-Vilarelle

[Pronouns: she/her/hers]

Professor of English, The College of New Jersey
Fulbright Research Chair in Society and Culture, Univ of Alberta, 2021-22

Genre Studies Delegate, Modern Language Association
Book Reviews Editor, a/b: Auto/Biography Studies
Author,Américanas, Autocracy, and Autobiographical Innovation

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Colleagues,
We hope you are doing well.
KaaVonia and I have a new call for papers we are sharing with you.
We have included an abstract below.
We welcome your questions, submissions, and collaborations.
Much peace,
Lucy and Kaa
Biographical and Documentary Research Special Interest Group, AERA

Educational Embodiments: 

Life Writing the Body 

 

A volume in the Research in Life Writing and Education Series (Information Age Publishing) 

 

Call For Papers: 

Abstracts Due May 15, 2022 

 

(Peer-Reviewed Edited Collection) 

 

Edited by: 

Lucy E. Bailey, Oklahoma State University, & KaaVonia Hinton, Old Dominion University 

 

This book focuses on life writing that centers body politics and embodiment in educational spaces. The aim of the book is to consider, examine, and voice the lived, fleshy, textured body as a site of politics, a site of embodied educative experiences, and a site of learning and teaching. We welcome varied genres of life writing that engage with diverse theories, epistemologies and ontologies to explore experiences and politics of educative and learning body-minds (Clare, 2017) in varied educational environments and locales, whether virtual spaces, homes, hospitals, workshops, or classrooms. Researchers and educators alike have long championed the disembodied researcher and teacher as the ideal collectors and vehicles for knowledge production and emphasized the intellect over the full body in pedagogies, analyses, and fieldwork. Drew Leder (1990), in fact, reminded us decades ago that our bodies often disappear from our consciousness, emerging only in moments in which we are injured, in pain, or suffering. Writers have long recognized the need to narrate experiences with wounding and healing to explore and reclaim the self (e.g., Couser, 1997, 2007; Frank, 1995; Leder, 1990). Further, we are always enfleshed in diverse ways in various locales, always changing, moving, becoming, aging, singing, aching, growing, becoming marred, and scarred, and stronger and bigger, and smaller again. We are embodied with others, interacting with other body-mind-souls that awaken interrelational proxemics and kinesthetic experiences. We learn from moving, in moving, or, become an “I” or a “we” through and within that movement (Brown, 2013; Thompson, 2017; Young, 2005). All of these embodied engagements have educative potential. 

Tentative Submission and Publishing Timeline 

Proposals Due May 15, 2022  

  • Notification of Proposal Acceptance: June 15, 2022  
  • Full versions of selected papers are due to the editors: by September 15, 2022 
  • Suggestions and revisions on submissions sent to authors from the editors: November 1, 2022 
  • Final, revised essay for peer-review due to editors: January 15, 2023 
  • Anticipated Date for Publication: Late Spring, Summer, 2023  Please submit 300-500 word abstract to Lucy.bailey@okstate.edu and khintonj@odu.edu, using the subject line, “life writing the body”.  
  1. A single Word file using American Psychological Association, 7th Edition; 
  • An abstract of 300-500 words, with a working title, proposed components of the chapter; methodological/inquiry approach; possible theoretical allegiances for the chapter; potential significance for scholarship on the field of education, teaching, or life writing; a statement concerning which of the three themes you are pursuing; a working bibliography of 5–10 sources; and 
  • Brief biographical note or 1 page CV from author(s). 
Peace, LB
Lucy E. Bailey, Ph.D.
Social Foundations and Qualitative Inquiry
Director of Gender, Women’s, and Sexuality Studies
Member, Digital Humanities Initiative
Oklahoma State University
She/Her/Hers
215 Willard Hall
Stillwater, OK 74074
lucy.bailey@okstate.edu
Co-Editor, Research in Life Writing in Education Book Series
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2022 PAMLA | On (Re)Shaping Identity: Self-Portraiture and the Quotidian

November 11, 2022 to November 13, 2022

Deadline for Submissions, May 15, 2022

Please contact the presiding officer for this session, Ariana Lyriotakis, with any questions: lyriotaa@tcd.ie

CFP submissions must be submitted through PAMLA’s portal, as listed below.

119th session of PAMLA

2022 – Los Angeles, CA (November 11-13, 2022 – entirely in-person)

Special Session – CFP “On (Re)Shaping Identity: Self-Portraiture and the Quotidian

Persona and confessional poetry of the Postmodern period enact an undeniable relationship with the quotidian. But how do these poems explore a visual depiction and an expression of self-identity in ordinary life? This panel will explore the methods by which poets manipulate and reject aesthetic production in their poetry, while calling into question subjectivity and truthful composition.

This special session will explore poetic self-portraiture and the shaping of identity within the bounds of the quotidian. John Ashbery’s “Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror” is perhaps one of the more notable examples from this era; as a poetry firmly situated within the intermediality of poetic textual images and art, he addresses “the enchant of self with self” through personal depiction and aesthetic production. But what is revealed to the reader in these moments of vulnerability and self-appraisal? How can the poet be both subject and object, while constructing a poetic likeness amongst the commonplace? This panel seeks poetry of self-encounter, whether banal or familiar, to interrogate an inward/outward representation of the self within these constructs.

Contributions are invited relating to any of the following aspects, as well as broader interpretations of the theme which may illuminate and elucidate in greater detail.

  • Depictions of the domestic and the visual
  • Intermediality of poetic textual images and art
  • Interrogations of the actual and the self
  • Orality and performance in poetry
  • Visuality of text and experimentation
  • Mimesis and the composition of ordinary spaces
  • Interdeterminacy and temporality

Deadline: May 15, 2022. Abstracts must be submitted through the PAMLA website only .

The web address for this session’s CFP is: https://pamla.ballastacademic.com/Home/S/18564

All panel participants/presenters must join PAMLA by July 1, 2022.

https://pamla.ballastacademic.com

Contact Info:

Presiding Officer for this Special Session at PAMLA:

Ariana Lyriotakis, Trinity College Dublin

lyriotaa@tcd.ie

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Memoir 101: Writing Your Life Story.

Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA) Conference, November 11-13, 2022. Los Angeles, California

deadline for submissions:
May 15, 2022
contact email:

The conference theme, “Geographies of the Fantastic and Quotidian,” can easily apply to personal narratives of Memoir and creative non-fiction. Let’s explore how the writers of these genres navigate memories, fantasies, and realities of life to create stories rich in lessons and meaning.

This session will serve as a gathering place for memoir authors, editors, and readers. At first glance, writing our life stories seems easy, but anyone who’s ever braved the task will tell you otherwise. What makes writing memoirs and creative non-fiction so tricky? The answer lies in recognizing the elements of our stories most appealing to our readers. In this workshop, we’ll set off to dispel the myths about one of today’s most popular genres. We’ll also explore the main elements of memoir, and learn techniques a writer can use to create a dynamic personal narrative.


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2022 BIO Conference

Friday through Sunday, May 13–15, 2022

Online

Biographers International Organization (BIO) welcomes biographers, editors, agents, publishers, and publicity professionals from across the nation and around the world to the 12th annual BIO Conference, being held virtually. BIO is honored again to partner with the Leon Levy Center for Biography to host this event. Registration for the 2022 BIO Conference is now available through Eventbrite.

The 2022 BIO conference will take place online Friday through Sunday, May 13–15, 2022. Panels, social hours, and roundtables are live and take place in real time. Other events are prerecorded and may be watched at your convenience. The panels will also be recorded and available to conference participants a week or two after the conference itself.

The cost of registration is $49 for BIO members, $99 for nonmembers. Those in need of financial assistance may apply for a Chip Bishop Fellowship here.

The conference will begin with the James Atlas Plenary, in which two experimental biographers address the theme of the conference: “Disrupting the Conventions of Biography.” Plenary speakers will be Craig Brown, author of 99 Glimpses of Princess Margaret and 150 Glimpses of the Beatles; and George Packer, author of Our Man: Richard Holbrooke and the End of the America Century.

On Saturday the 2022 BIO Award winner, Megan Marshall, will deliver the keynote address. A long-time advocate for biography and biographers, Marshall is the author of The Peabody Sisters: Three Women Who Ignited American RomanticismMargaret Fuller: A New American Life; and Elizabeth Bishop: A Miracle for Breakfast. Her books have received multiple awards, including the Pulitzer Prize for Margaret Fuller.

Panels on the basics of biography, its craft, its business aspects, and its recent disruptions are offered on all three days. Sixteen live Zoom panels will include Biography in the Age of #metoo; Biography in Different Forms; Biography in the Worst of Times; Biographies of Families and Family Members; Black Women’s Biography; and Bertelsmann and the Future of Publishing.

Also offered will be round tables on various subjects, short readings of new books by members, announcements of the Biblio award and fellowship winners, and the announcement of the Plutarch Award for the best biography of 2021, as judged by biographers. New this year will be two virtual social hours, one on Friday afternoon and the other on Sunday evening.

Additional information is available on the BIO website.

Linda Leavell
President, Biographers International Organization
president@biographersinternational.org
biographersinternational.org

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New Perspectives on the “Confessing Animal”

Conference: Berlin (& online), 22-23 July 2022

See also: https://disclosureconference.wordpress.com/

+++ DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS: 10 MAY 2022 +++

Never has Foucault’s diagnosis of “confessing animal[s]” (or “beast[s] of confession,” which would be a far better translation of the French bête d’aveu) been more relevant than it is today. The first two decades of the twenty-first century have seen an exponential growth of confessing, primarily, though not exclusively, in the vast digital archive of social media. Whereas twentieth-century confessional phenomena have received considerable attention from literary and cultural critics, the more recent manifestations of confessional culture remain largely unexplored.

On the other hand (though not unrelatedly), social media has also been linked to a new kind of social justice activism that takes place primarily online, as well as having been accused of the rise of identity politics more broadly. While there is good reason to remain skeptical about the media-driven publicizing and commodification of the most intimate details of people’s lives, especially this latter development demonstrates the urgent need we currently have for holding individuals (and other legal entities, such as governments or corporations) accountable for their actions.

Confession, before the Romantic cult of subjectivity reduced it to “mere” self-expression, provided exactly this: a mechanism whereby people can not only be held accountable for their actions but also faced with the consequences of those actions, and, eventually, be released from the burden of their pasts.

These tensions are explored by DISCLOSURE, an interdisciplinary research group founded by a Ph.D. candidate, Sonja Pyykkö (Freie Universität Berlin), with master’s students from various departments represented within the Berlin University Alliance.

We are inviting participants for a two-day symposium over a summer weekend in Berlin (remote online participation possible), set to explore the current state and future directions of the “confessing animal,” as Michel Foucault’s famous diagnosis from The History of Sexuality (1976/78) goes. Foucault was notably suspicious of what he saw as a ritual of voluntary self-subjugation, both in its ancient Christian and contemporary Freudian manifestations.

After decades of Foucault-inspired suspicious criticism, DISCLOSURE seeks to rethink confession in light of the crises of accountability that are becoming the hallmark of twenty-first century social justice projects. Like Foucault, we think that confession is indeed integral to secular modernity, but unlike Foucault, we do not think that this is an altogether bad thing: Rather than a dated and coercive ritual of self-policing, we take confession be a secular means of moral self-inquiry and an aesthetic of self-fashioning focused on character, defined by a set of moral values and principles—ethos.

For our first symposium, we invite scholars working on adjacent topics to join us in developing new critical approaches to the study of confession. We especially welcome comparative and interdisciplinary approaches and perspectives broadening our understanding of what constitutes “confession” in different 21st century contexts.

Proposals for papers, to be presented either in workshop or panel discussion format, may wish to address the following areas:

  • Confession in literature: contemporary poetry, essay, memoir, autofiction and autotheory, narrative nonfiction
  • Confession in performance and media: true crime, podcasts, vlogs and blogs, video games, social media, stand-up comedy, spoken word, performance art
  • Confession in society: social justice movements (e.g., Me Too, Black Lives Matter), identity politics (e.g., LGBTQI+), institutional and incumbent confession (e.g., churches, governments, corporations)

Junior researchers, including master’s students, are likewise encouraged to submit an abstract. Join us in asking what it means to confess in the twenty-first century!

+++ Deadline for Abstracts: 10 May 2022 +++

Abstracts (max. 300 words) must be sent to both Sonja Pyykkö (pyykko@gsnas.fu-berlin.de) and Elizabeth Neumann (claraelin95@zedat.fu-berlin.de). For enquiries, please contact Elizabeth Neumann, claraelin95@zedat.fu-berlin.de.

Organizing committee: Sonja Pyykkö (Graduate School of North American Studies, Freie Universität Berlin), Elizabeth Neumann, Felix Fischer, Konstantin Helm, Hannah Maier-Katkin, Dilayda Tülübaş, Metin Turgut.

This project is funded by the Berlin University Alliance.

Contact Info:

For enquiries, please contact Elizabeth Neumann (she/her), claraelin95@zedat.fu-berlin.de.

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The Epistolary Research Network (TERN)

The Epistolary Research Network (TERN) is pleased to announce its third conference, to be held 30 September – 1 October 2022.

This online symposium seeks papers from scholars everywhere who have an interest in letters and correspondence throughout history. For thousands of years, in every region of the globe, letters brought people together when physical distance separated them. They derive from many parts of society. From princes to prisoners, letters transported greetings and farewells, news from distant friends, consolation in times of anxiety, triumph against rivals, submission to fate. We usually know who wrote them, but who read them?

TERN is especially interested in letters that address a theme which emerged from last year’s conference, “The Other Reader(s).”

From the ancient world to the post-modern, epistolary efforts have often been undertaken with at least one eye toward future unknown readers. For instance, Pliny the Younger used his private correspondence, reworked into books, to give himself and his uncle, Pliny the Elder, distinct identities that continue to impact how we understand these men today. And it was not always the case that letters were destined for the general public or even a specific person. Sometimes epistolary writings ended up in unexpected hands with unintended consequences for those who composed them. Possible topics might include, but are not limited to:

a) letters used to create public identities, distinct from private ones; the benefits or limits to using letters to understand the lives of others

b) the various ways letters were copied, shared or read aloud, and why this was done; how accidental readers create alternative interpretations

c) the role of editors, or anyone involved in turning individual letters into a collection; how their decisions influenced later perceptions of the letter sender, familial relations or our knowledge of history more generally

d) letters that never reached their addressee, including perhaps those of soldiers, immigrants, adventurers, POWs, and the role played by dead letter offices, historians, museums and archives (digital or paper)

Proposals (maximum 250 words) and a brief biography should be sent to ternetwork@hotmail.com. Deadline is May 2, 2022. The conference language will be English. Publication of selected papers will be arranged following the conference.

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***CALL FOR PAPERS***

THEME: Domesticity and Persona (Volume 8, Issue 2)

ISSUE EDITORS: Dr Kim Barbour (University of Adelaide) and Dr Michael Humphrey (Colorado State University)

* Abstracts due – 29 April 2022

Revolutions political, social, personal, technological, and beyond have changed the way many people relate to the word “domestic.” At the same time, the feeling of home is still very familiar to many. This became readily evident during the COVID-19 pandemic, as homes became the scene for a far more expansive set of life activities. For some, rather than crossing beyond a private domain to the shared world, the shared world peered into a slice of millions of private lives, prepared neatly for the eye of a webcam, or interrupted by passing pets, partners, and children. For others, the external gaze was resisted, views carefully obstructed to preserve the sanctity of the domestic sphere. For still others, the domestic space became (or continued to be) a place of surveillance, isolation, imprisonment, and repression.

In the midst of these changes, both new and old, we are calling for theoretical, critical, empirical, and/or creative responses that investigate the persona in domesticity. Which personas flourish in domestic light and which shrink? Who expands or constricts the boundaries of domesticity? What freedoms and/or restrictions await, and for whom? How do we understand domesticity and personas in a time of collapsed contexts and multipurpose spaces?

THEMES AND ISSUES INCLUDE BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO:  

* Parenting, homemaking, life-hacks, pets, home spaces

* Work/Life (im)balance

* Authenticity and the domestic sphere

* Shared domestic spaces and labour

* Queering domesticity

* Protest and counter-narratives of domesticity

* Taboo and domestic personas

* Power, control, violence and victimisation in domestic persona performance

* Domestic personas through history

* Labour and the domestic persona

* Personas in paid domestic work

* Gender, race, and/or class and domestic personas

* Visualising domestic personas

* Visibilising domestic spaces and personas through lockdown and WfH

* Theorising domesticity through persona

* Persona curation and ‘work from home’ / ‘learn from home’ spaces

* Theorising persona through domesticity

* Celebrity and domesticity

* Platformed domesticity and personas

* Domesticity and education

* Domesticating devices and persona building 

To register your interest:

Please submit a 250-300 word abstract to personastudies@gmail.com, including the proposed article/creative response title, and a short author bio (50-100 words) for each contributor, no later than 29 April 2022. Ensure the abstract clearly connects to the theme of the issue – a short statement in the email to explain the fit with the issue is welcome but not necessary. Please see the Key Dates below for the timeline for the issue, noting that deadlines should be read in your own time zone.

Key Dates:

* Abstracts due – 29 April 2022

* Invitation for full papers – 06 May 2022

* Full papers due for peer review – 15 August 2022

* Peer review results returned – 12 September 2022

* Revised papers due – 14 October 2022

* Issue release date – November 2022

Michael Humphrey, Ph.D.
Asst. Professor, Journalism and Media Communication
Clark C 205
Campus Delivery 1785
Colorado State University
Fort Collins, CO 80523
o: 970-480-7583
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“Narrating Lives”: International Conference on Storytelling, (Auto)Biography and (Auto)Ethnography
27-28 August 2022 – London/Online
organised online by
London Centre for Interdisciplinary Research

Life-history approach occupies the central place in conducting and producing  (auto)biographical and (auto)ethnographic studies through the understanding of self, other, and culture. We construct and develop conceptions and practices by engaging with memory through narrative, in order to negotiate ambivalences and uncertainties of the world and to represent (often traumatic) experiences.
The “Narrating Lives” conference will focus on reading and interpreting (auto)biographical texts and methods across the humanities, social sciences, and visual and performing arts. It will analyse theoretical and practical approaches to life writing and the components of (auto)biographical acts, including memory, experience, identity, embodiment, space, and agency. We will attempt to identify key concerns and considerations that led to the development of the methods and to outline the purposes and ethics of (auto)biographical and (auto)ethnographic research.

We aim to explore a variety of techniques for gathering data on the self-from diaries to interviews to social media and to promote understanding of multicultural others, qualitative inquiry, and narrative writing.
Conference panels will be related, but not limited, to:

  • Life Narrative in Historical Perspective
  • Qualitative Research Methods
  • Oral History, Memory and Written Tradition
  • Journalism and Literary Studies
  • Creative Writing and Performing Arts
  • (Auto)Biographical Element in Film Studies, Media and Communication
  • Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy
  • Storytelling in Education
  • Ethics and Politics of Research

Submissions may be proposed in various formats, including:

  • Individually submitted papers (organised into panels by the committee)
  • Panels (3-4 individual papers)
  • Posters

Proposals should be sent by 30 April 2022 to: life-history@lcir.co.uk. To download the paper proposal form and find out more about the latest deadline, please visit our website: https://life-history.lcir.co.uk/.
Please download Paper proposal form.
Registration fee (online participation) – 90 GBP 
Registration fee (physical participation) – TBC
Selected papers will be published in a post-conference volume with ISBN.

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Unending Translation: Creative Critical Experiments in Translation and Life Writing

Deadline for abstract proposals: April 15th, 2022

Publisher: UCL Press (tbc)

The aim of this collected edition is to explore different approaches to translation criticism through the medium of life writing. Traditionally assigned to the paratextual, the translator’s point of view rarely occupies the narrative centre of creative writing and essays. In recent years, however, contemporary translators have taken on a more prominent role in translation criticism, exploring their practice through the medium of memoirs and experimental essays allowing for fragmentation, doubt and openness to be expressed in subjective modes of writing. The translational turn to life writing and the essay can be interpreted as a challenge to the separation between practice and theory which traditionally exists in translation studies. On the one hand, the meeting between translation and life writing can be seen as an attempt to rethink autobiographical forms, reinventing the terms within which we create, shape and think the category of the subject through literature. On the other, creative-critical experiments in essay writing and translation have allowed for a more embodied and situated critical engagement with translation, an opportunity to explore translation as a practice-led thinking of texts and writing in their own right. The meeting between translation and life writing thus shifts our literary focus from thinking about the essence of individual works to thinking about translation as a space of subjective and material entanglement, a practice capable of re-imagining relations not only between cultures but between the traditionally opposed practices of reading and writing, thinking and doing.

In this collected monograph, we ask and call for translators, writers, teachers and critics to approach translation practice from such an embodied, situated position. What happens when translation meets life writing? But also, what happens when translation shapes the essay as a form, and when the essay in its turn continues translation? What happens, in other words, when translation practice becomes the subject rather than the object of literary introspection? How can life writing accounts of translation make us rethink our understanding of the relationship between translation and politics, translation and life?

We welcome experimental essays and life writing experiments, for example: 

– Stories of a translator’s personal experience that narrate the interpretive experience as a writerly one.

– Experimental approaches to translation that rewrite a text through the translator’s engagement with it, or perhaps weave together different types of text, playing with form.

– Reflections on the subject position and voice of the translator, both as a lived experience but also as a politically situated one that is enjoined to tackle on the one hand the appropriative gesture of translation and on the other, the marginalised, secondary position that translation takes in traditional binaries of original/translation.

– Writings that play on the form of the translator’s commentary, responding to the traditional forms of translator prefaces, footnotes etc.

– Essays that multiply translational variants through a collection of hybrid approaches.

– Translations where the figure of the author is translated into the figure of the translator

– Stories of translation that give unique openings onto texts, for example through the interweaving of translation and commentary in the translation of genetic material (manuscripts, authorial marginalia, intertexts etc.)

– Writings that explore translation as fiction, in the sense given by Kate Briggs as an invitation to suspend one’s disbelief, to enter the foreign as though it is familiar, but also that tell a story of the time and place of the translating figure.

– Writings that visibilise the translator’s voice but their process and technique, challenging the injunction to produce a unitary, sole text as a finished product to be sellable.

– Translator writings that reflect upon political and identity dynamics such as feminist translation or decolonial practices. Reflections on the specificity of translating minority, regional, non-standardized or non-national languages are also welcome here.

– Heterolingual experiences that mix languages, texts, translations and originals and deterritorialize the attachment of languages to nation states.

Bibliography

C. Bergvall (2016) Drift. Brooklyn, Nightboat.

K. Briggs (2018) This Little Art. London, Fitzcarraldo Editions.

B. Brown (2011) The Poems of Gaius Valerius Catullus. San Francisco, CA, Krupskaya.

– (2012) Flowering Mall. Berkeley, Roof.

J. Butler. (2019) ‘Gender in Translation: Beyond Monolingualism’, Philosophia. Albany, N.Y. Vol.9 (1), pp.1-25.

A. Carson (2009) Nox. NYC, New Directions.

S. Collins (2016) Currently & Emotion.Londres, Test Centre.

M. Gansel (2017) Translation as Transhumance, trans. by Ros Schwartz. London, Les Fugitives

D. Grass (2021) ‘Translating the Archives: An Autotheoretical Experiment’, in Thinking Through Relation: Encounters in Creative Critical Writing. ed. by Florian Mussgnug, Mathelinda Nabugodi and Thea Petrou. London, Peter Lang.

T. Hermans (1996) ‘The Translator’s Voice in Translated Narrative’, in Target. International Journal of Translation Studies. Vol.8 (1), pp. 23-48.

C. Gepner (2019) Traduire ou perdre pied. Paris, Contre-allée.

N. Grunwald (2021) Sur les bouts de la langue: traduire en féministe/s. Paris: Contre-allée.

S. Kadiu (2019) Reflexive Translation Studies: Translation as Critical Reflection. London, UCL Press.

​​J. Lahiri (2016) In Other Words. New York, Knopf.

S. De Lotbinière-Harwood (1991) Re-belle et infidèle, la traduction comme réecriture au féminin; the Body Bilingual, translation as rewriting in the feminine. Québec, Les Editions du remue-ménage/Women’s Press.

E. Mouré (2004) Sheep’s Vigil by a Fervent Person: A transelation of Alberto Caeiro/Fernando Pessoa’s Oguardador de rebanhos. Toronto,House of Anansi Press.

– (2014) Secession with Incession. Montréal, Book Thug.

J. Osman & J. Spahr (eds.) (2003) Chain 10: Translucinación. Philadelphia, PA, Temple University Press.

N. Ramayya (2019) States of the Body Produced by Love, Ignota Books.

L. Robert-Foley (2013) m. Luxembourg, Corrupt Press.

C. Rossi (2018) ‘Translation as a Creative Force’, The Routledge Handbook of Translation and Culture, ed. by Sue Ann Harding. London, Routledge.

M. de la Torre (2020) Repetition Nineteen. New York, Nightboat Books.

C. Wright (2013) Yoko Tawada’s Portrait of a Tongue. Ottawa, University of Ottawa Press.

Timeline:

Deadline for abstract proposals: April 15th, 2022

Response to proposals: May 15th, 2022

Completed articles due: October 15th

Delphine Grass/Lancaster University, Lily Robert-Foley / Université Paul Valéry Montpellier 3

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CALL FOR PAPERS

Telling Life Stories: Ethos, Positionality, and Structures of Narrative

The reading and analysing of life stories offer multiple perspectives in understanding the self-reflexivity of authorial consciousness, the rhetorical/stylistic fashioning of ethos, and the fabulation/fictionality of narrative. Lived experiences, of the author as well as the reader, allow perception of meaning against the sedimented social, political, and cultural paradigms of the “master” or “grand narrative,” as Jean-François Lyotard puts in his seminal work, The Postmodern Condition (1979). The dialectic of human action and social reality within such narratives serves to map the interrelated progression of individuals and cultures throughout history.

As a challenge to the uniform idea of art as a politicized structure, the heterogeneity introduced by popular culture introduces new questions surrounding emotional engagement and intellectual stimulation within the domain of production and reception of life writing; these questions are reflected in recent experiments with structure, style, and theme. Featuring the agential role of an individual in the larger social-political scheme, autobiographical writing represents a common structure of narrative experience. Even as authors seek to share lifeworlds, readers bring their own positionality and narrative experience to bear in response. The result is an intertexual dialogue, in which authorial expression allows independent enquiries to come to force.

By engaging with life narratives and their readerly interpretation, we gather up resources to reexamine the role of narrative as an epistemology or ‘way of knowing,’ as well as to raise questions pertaining to the subjectivity of the author, the positionality of the reader, and the re-evaluation of factors affecting textual production. The narrative ethos of the writer writing, as reflected in the emotive engagement of the reader reading, highlights the shared experience of such discourse. Interpretation creates narrative models which reflect psychological underpinnings, as influenced by culturally available forms and content. Within this ethical/ethotic textual frame, the identity of the reader is projected along with the constructed identity of the author/protagonist/narrator.

Within the current global pandemic, the existential premise of breathing, face-to-face contact/communication is, for the moment, withheld: we speak through masks–literally. Meeting online, we speak and listen, type and read through screen images and avatars, our living presences subsumed within the technologies of digital representation. This loss of intimacy leads us to revisit a question as old as Western classical rhetoric, though relevant today. It’s a question of ethos: that is, of constructing/representing/positioning the speaking/writing self within the textual space of language. Ethos unfolds within the structures of narrative, positioning the speaker/writer culturally and historically. Further, this unfolding is performed before (and on behalf of) the hearer/reader, who is invited into the textual space as (caring) witness and (critical) respondent. Such is a twofold premise of this issue.

For this issue, we seek submissions that consider, challenge, or generate discussion about life narratives. Serious explorations/applications of emergent fields such as narrative therapy and trauma and memory studies are welcome. We are most interested in those that come from underrepresented perspectives, cultures, or positions that provide an additional view on our collective humanity. Please engage with the topics below or feel free to go beyond:

  • Biopics and the fashioning of the self/persona
  • Visual arts and autoethnography
  • Travel journalism and indigenous cultures
  • Everyday narratives in popular culture
  • Documentaries and docufiction
  • Folklife and community narratives
  • Online personas and the plural selves/subjectivity
  • Intersubjective and intertextual space of narrative
  • Sovereignty of expression amidst media control
  • Narrative politics in popular domain
  • Revisioning exclusion in age of digitization
  • Memoirs from the margins (LGBTQ+)
  • Aborignal life narratives
  • War diaries and journals
  • Mass culture and the consumption of life narratives
  • Reappraisal of historical figures in the times of hypernationalism

Submissions: Only complete papers will be considered for publication. The papers need to be submitted according to the guidelines of the MLA 8th edition. You are welcome to submit full length papers (3,500–10,000 words) along with a 150 words abstract and list of keywords. Please read the submission guidelines before making the submission – http://ellids.com/author-guidelines/submission-guidelines/. Please feel free to email any queries to – editors@ellids.com.

Please make all submissions via the form: https://forms.gle/ButBog95zvvFbyrS8

Submission deadline: 15th April, 2022

Website: http://ellids.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/journal.llids/

Contact Email:

Life’s Not Personal: A Creative – Critical Conference on Experimental Life Writing

deadline for submissions:
April 15, 2022
Midlands4Cities AHRC

There has always been a need to adapt and disrupt conventions to tell one’s story and now there are almost as many forms of life writing as there are different lives. The boundaries of representation are continually being pushed. ‘Life’s Not Personal: A Creative-Critical Conference on Experimental Life Writing’ seeks to explore these narratives from both theoretical and practice-based perspectives.

We are looking for papers that engage with novel modes of life writing, hybridity, marginal perspectives, and the ever-changing parameters of genre and privacy. Genres of interest include but are not limited to: autotheory, autofiction, lyric essays, graphic narratives, online representations of the self and hybrid forms. Papers can be based on any time period using exemplary works that attend to the conference themes.

We’re also looking for creative work that experiments with the ‘I’, plays with the form of life writing or offers a marginalised perspective on writing a life.

Submitted papers will culminate in a creative-critical conference taking place online on Tuesday 26th July 2022. The day will feature an exciting mix of talks and performances, alongside inspiring keynotes, an interactive workshop and opportunities to connect and network. The conference is aimed at researchers and practitioners of all levels working within life-writing. It is being organised in collaboration with Midlands4Cities Doctoral Training Partnership and Arts and Humanities Research Council.

To participate, please send a 250-word abstract outlining your paper or creative piece and a 100-word biography to lifesnotpersonalconference@gmail.com by Friday 15th April 2022.

Direct any queries you have to: lifesnotpersonalconference@gmail.com

For more information, visit the conference website at: https://lifesnotpersonalconference.wordpress.com/ 

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“The Circle of Life” – Birth, Dying, and the Liminality of Life since the Nineteenth Century

September 1, 2022 to September 2, 2022

Deadline for Submissions: April 15, 2022

Poland

Birth and dying are the only life events that everyone experiences – without anyone being able to tell about them. As existential transitions in human life they have a profound significance for every society. Surprisingly, in historical research they are usually considered in isolation. Anthropologists and ethnologists, on the other hand, have been interpreting them as entangled practices for a long time, as envisioned in the concept of liminality and rites of passage by Arnold van Gennep and Victor Turner. In observing that cultures have different approaches to these phenomena, they observed that their functions depended on the specifics of a given society and its cultural beliefs and performances.

However, rites of passage and liminal stages do not only have a cultural dimension. Rather, they are connected with historical change. This can be seen in modern societies where processes such as secularisation, modernisation, scientification, and rationalisation had a major impact on (religious) systems of beliefs as well as everyday life. Therefore, these processes also influenced the meaning of liminality and rites of passage that are subjects to public discourses, political decisions, and legal requirements. To give but two examples: So-called ‘pro-life’ groups try to alter the definition of the beginning of life, in order to prepone the moment the state is obligated to protect this life. The Heartbeat Law in Texas or the decision of the Polish Constitutional Tribunal from October 2020, but also historical discourses like the pre-referendum debates in the Republic of Ireland in the early 1980s show how impactful these discussions about the liminal stage of conception could be in modern societies. In a similar vein, debates on euthanasia have triggered a broad international controversy on when life ends – and on how people can die “with dignity” in the light of medical opportunities to prolong the life of terminal patients further and further. While the ethical and legal legitimacy of mercy killings is still disputed in most countries, passive forms of euthanasia are generally accepted, even in Catholic societies.

Because they are subjects to individual and intimate aspects of human life as well as because of their relevance for societies, the thinking and arguing about liminality and rites of passage tend to be discussed in a controversial manner. The stages of conception, birth(-giving), and dying show exemplarily the general ambivalence liminality and rites of passage can create in political discussions as well as their complex legal implications.

We invite interested scholars to join our conference where we would like to analyse and investigate concepts of liminality and rites of passage in a historical perspective, with a particular focus on social changes in modern industrialised societies.

Thus, we are interested, among others, in the following questions:

  • how do modern, especially pluralist, societies deal with the above mentioned liminal stages at the beginning and end of human life;
  • which factors and processes have influence on changes in understanding and interpreting these stages;
  • how do modern societies and their diverse subgroups react to social change, shifts in values, and scientific innovation with regard to the liminal stages of conception, birth(-giving), and dying;
  • which notions, ideas, and (legal) traditions influence the legislative regulation of these stages?

The workshop will be held at the German Historical Institute in Warsaw on 1 and 2 September 2022 with financial support of the German Research Foundation. In case of travel restrictions due to the pandemic, the workshop will be held in a hybrid or online format. The workshop language will be English. Travel expenses of invited speakers will be reimbursed, accommodation will be provided by the German Historical Institute Warsaw.

Proposals for 20-minutes presentations should include a short abstract (approx. 300 words), a title, a short bio (half a page), institutional affiliation, email address, and should be sent to the workshop organisers Michael Zok (zok@dhi.waw.pl) and Florian Greiner (florian.greiner@ebert-gedenkstaette.de) by 15 April 2022.

Contact Info:

Dr. Michael Zok

German Historical Institute Warsaw

Pałac Karnickich

Aleje Ujazdowskie 39

PL-00-540 Warszawa

zok@dhi.waw.pl

Michael Zok (@doc__zok) / Twitter

Contact Email:

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“Writing Tasmanian Lives” Winter Symposium

22–24 June 2022

University of Tasmania
 

CALL FOR PAPERS

About us 

Writing Lives is a new research program based in the School of Humanities at the University of Tasmania, harnessing existing expertise and building capacity in critical studies of life writing, biography, oral history, microhistory, history of ideas, memoir, and personal writing such as letters and diaries.

Our program is working to foster dialogue about life writing as a form and genre that crosses disciplinary boundaries and embraces possibilities offered by texts, objects, and nonhuman as well as human lives.

We are also working to engage community and cultural sector partners both within lutruwita/Tasmania and nationally in this exciting research area.

The symposium

To showcase the many possibilities offered by this field of research, we are delighted to announce the call for papers for our first symposium, to be held online over the afternoons of Wednesday 22, Thursday 23 and Friday 24 June 2022.

In this symposium we turn our focus to the local as we examine the challenges presented by the discipline and practice of biography and life-writing in and about Tasmania and Tasmanians.

The symposium program will encourage discussion about what is at stake – critically, creatively, historically, and ethically – in writing the life stories of Tasmanians, whether historically well-known or hitherto uncelebrated.

We are especially interested in exploring the following questions:

  • What does it mean to write biography in lutruwita/Tasmania, about its residents (living or dead) or about the lives that have influenced our state’s history?
  • How can we make personal histories and biographies in lutruwita/Tasmania visible to the broader community?
  • How do we connect local life stories to national and international histories and communities?
  • How does lutruwita/Tasmania feature in both human and more-than-human life stories throughout history?
  • What role do collectors and archivists play in documenting and understanding Tasmanian lives?

Papers on the theme of Writing Tasmanian Lives, interpreted in its widest sense, drawing on scholarship and experience from the humanities, creative arts, social sciences, education, and natural science, and from other diverse fields such as library, museum, archives, and cultural studies, are encouraged.

We also welcome papers that engage with broader questions about life writing and biography that go beyond the local context, such as:

  • What is life writing and what forms should it take?
  • Whose lives should we examine?
  • How does the form of life-writing change with the needs of the subject?
  • How can we celebrate diversity through life writing, amplifying the voices of people who have been pushed into the margins of history and literature?
  • How can we decolonise biography?
  • Where lives have not been thoroughly documented, how can we make imaginative use of archival material?

Plenary events include a keynote address by Dr Jessica White (UniSA), about her work writing an ecobiography of Georgiana Molloy, and a panel conversation on writing Indigenous lives. More information about keynote speakers and events will be circulated closer to the date. 

Proposal submissions and registration

Please email abstracts and proposals (200 words approx.) for a 20-minute presentation by Thursday, 14 April 2022 to: writing.lives@utas.edu.au

Submissions should also include your name, institutional affiliation where relevant, e-mail address, the title of your proposed paper, and a short bio (50 words approx.).

We will advise if your proposal has been accepted for inclusion in the program and provide further details of the registration process.

Event delivery and registration

At time of writing, this will be an online event with panel sessions delivered via Zoom.

If possible, some of the keynote plenary sessions and workshops will also take place in person in nipaluna/Hobart. Whether we proceed with any live components will be dependent on the COVID-19 situation and any restrictions that are in place, which will be considered nearer the time.

For further information, do not hesitate to get in touch at writing.lives@utas.edu.au

We look forward to receiving your submission.

Contact Info:

Naomi Milthorpe, University of Tasmania

Contact Email:

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The Center for Biographical Research presents:
Sweat and Salt Water: Generating a Testament to the Legacy of Teresia Kieuea Teaiwa”

Thursday, March 31 at 12PM to 1:15PM (HST) on Zoom
Zoom Meeting ID: 964 6893 6495
Password: 765773
Meeting link: https://hawaii.zoom.us/j/95496570215

Dr. April K. Henderson, Director of Va’aomanū Pasifika—Programmes in Pacific Studies and Samoan Studies, Te Herenga Waka/Victoria University of Wellington

Terence Wesley-Smith, Professor (retired), Center for Pacific Islands Studies, UHM

Katerina Teaiwa, Professor of Pacific Studies and Deputy Director – Higher Degree Research Training in the School of Culture, History and Language, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, Australian National University

Cosponsored by Hamilton Library, the Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution, Hui ʻĀina Pilipili: Native Hawaiian Initiative, the Hawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge, and the Departments of Ethnic Studies, Political Science, and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

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On 21 March 2017, Associate Professor Teresia Kieuea Teaiwa passed away at the age of forty-eight, precipitating an extraordinary outpouring of grief. Mourners referenced Teaiwa’s nurturing interactions, her innovative program-building, her feminist and political activism, her poetry, her Banaban/I-Kiribati/Fiji Islander and African American heritage, and her extraordinary ability to connect with people of all backgrounds.

This talk will focus on Sweat and Salt Water, a collection of Teaiwa’s scholarly and creative contributions over a professional career cut short. Together, the editors will discuss how it honors her legacy in various scholarly fields, including Pacific studies, Indigenous studies, literary studies, security studies, and gender studies.

Katerina Teaiwa is an interdisciplinary scholar and artist of Banaban, I-Kiribati and African American heritage born and raised in Fiji. She is professor and deputy director Higher Degree Research in the School of Culture, History, and Language, College of Asia and the Pacific, at the Australian National University. She was recently named the 2021 Australian University Teacher of the Year for her visionary approach to Pacific studies.

April K. Henderson is senior lecturer and director of Va‘aomanū Pasifika—Programme in Pacific Studies and Samoan Studies at Te Herenga Waka Victoria University of Wellington. Her research focuses on the circulation of music and performing and visual art forms between the US, the Pacific Islands, and Aotearoa New Zealand. She serves on the editorial boards of Perfect Beat and Popular Communication, and co-edits the University of Hawai’i Press book series Indigenous Pacifics, with Professor Noelani Goodyear-Ka‘ōpua. University of Hawai’i Press book series Indigenous Pacifics, co-edited with Professor Noelani Goodyear-Ka‘ōpua.

Terence Wesley-Smith recently retired from the University of Hawai’i after more than three decades with the Center for Pacific Islands Studies. He is a former director of the center, and former editor of The Contemporary Pacific. Professor Wesley-Smith has written extensively about Pacific Islands studies as an interdisciplinary project.

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Stories of Women Who Lost Their Beloved Ones
  The University of Hawai`i is conducting a study:
 
If you identify as a woman, 18 years old or older, and who have lost a beloved one (e.g., significant other, child, parent, siblings) and were one of their caregivers, please share your stories
 
Dr. L. Ayu Saraswati would like to invite you to participate in a research study.
 
The purpose of this study is to learn more about how women cope with the diagnosis and death of their beloved ones. 
 
Study volunteers will receive $ 10 Starbucks or equivalent gift certificate
 
To learn more about the study,
please email Dr. L. Ayu Saraswati at luhp@hawaii.edu  
http://drsaraswati.com

Books:
Saraswati, L. Ayu. Pain Generation: Social Media, Feminist Activism, and the Neoliberal Selfie (New York University Press, 2021) 
     Click here for the Instructor’s Guide
Saraswati, L.A. and Barbara Shaw, eds. Feminist and Queer Theory: An Intersectional and Transnational Reader (Oxford University Press, 2020)
Saraswati, L.A., Barbara Shaw, and Heather Rellihan, eds. Introduction to Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Second Edition. (Oxford University Press, 2020) 
Saraswati, L.A. Seeing Beauty, Sensing Race in Transnational Indonesia (University of Hawaii Press, 2013)

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The Stories We Tell Ourselves About Nice Things
 
Are you of Asian descent and are over 18 years old? 
Do you like to buy nice, luxurious, expensive items?
If the answer is YES

The University of Hawai`i is conducting a study:

Dr. L. Ayu Saraswati would like to invite you to participate in a research study.
 
The purpose of this study is to learn more about why we buy nice, luxurious, expensive items, and whether gender, racial and class backgrounds shape our consumption pattern. 
 
Study volunteers will receive $ 10 Starbucks or equivalent gift certificate
 
To learn more about the study,
please email Dr. L. Ayu Saraswati at luhp@hawaii.edu
 
http://drsaraswati.com
 
Books:
Saraswati, L. Ayu. Pain Generation: Social Media, Feminist Activism, and the Neoliberal Selfie (New York University Press, 2021) 
     Click here for the Instructor’s Guide
Saraswati, L.A. and Barbara Shaw, eds. Feminist and Queer Theory: An Intersectional and Transnational Reader (Oxford University Press, 2020)
Saraswati, L.A., Barbara Shaw, and Heather Rellihan, eds. Introduction to Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Second Edition. (Oxford University Press, 2020) 
Saraswati, L.A. Seeing Beauty, Sensing Race in Transnational Indonesia (University of Hawaii Press, 2013)

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Edited volume: Narratives of Gendered Abuse in Academia

deadline for submissions: 
April 1, 2022
Mary K Holland, SUNY New Paltz and Carrie Rohman, Lafayette College
contact email: 

While the #MeToo movement as a cultural, feminist, and antiracist force has been slowly and steadily uncovering and altering landscapes of gendered harassment and abuse across our society, academia itself as an abusive culture has remained fairly immune to these critiques. Recent events at Harvard, where senior scholars immediately lined up in support of a colleague accused of habitually harassing students, only to withdraw that support later, are sadly typical of the kneejerk defense of institutions and disregard for victims that characterize such cases. Scholars such as Sarah Ahmed have forcefully critiqued academic culture, helping us begin to theorize its endemic harassment and abuse. It is perhaps all too telling that Ahmed herself resigned from academia years ago, in protest over university failures around sexual harassment and assault. Ahmed’s crucial recent study Complaint! documents and explains the structures and mechanisms that enable institutions to reproduce misogyny and intersectional abuses of power rather than protecting individuials. This volume aims to use personal narratives to document what gendered harassment and violence in academia look and feel like, doing for them what Roxane Gay’s Not That Bad has done for rape and rape culture.

In her 1938 Three Guineas, Virginia Woolf repeatedly asks us to consider what it will mean for women to follow their educated brothers into the professions: “It is true that for the past twenty years we have been admitted to the Civil Service and to the Bar; but our position there is still very precarious and our authority of the slightest” (12). Nearly one hundred years later, this sentiment still resonates. Woolf was more than prescient in warning women about what they would face as they joined the ranks of patriarchal institutions. Our contemporary failures to confront the institutional violences that continue to be reproduced within our profession— that we could argue continue to be central to our profession— exacerbate her prophecies all the more.

The 2015 book Women Who Make a Fuss: The Unfaithful Daughters of Virginia Woolf, written by Isabelle Stengers and Vinciane Despret and a collective of academic women, takes up Woolf’s injunction, “think we must,” in order to ask if women in academia have changed the form of thought in their respective fields. While the primary authors make it clear that experiences of gendered “discrimination” are not precisely the centerpiece of their project, the disillusioning realities of being a female academic inevitably seep into their powerful volume. Stengers and Despret highlight the entrapments of academic life, explaining, “we are among those women who have been where Woolf said we must not go, or in any case, not stay, for staying there, seeking to make a career in the university, is to be captured by it (for both young men and women)” (52). As their incorporation of multiple female voices reveals, “once you are inside, they will look for ways to devitalize you” (Sironi qtd. in Stengers and Despret 103).

This edited collection will document narratives of gendered abuse and disadvantage in academia, in order to bear witness to the ways that women, and all whose gender expression falls outside heteronormative masculinity, are devitalized in higher education. We are interested in the power of memoir becoming “anonymous,” in the circulating of anecdote as feminist documentation, and in the idea that the personal is political, theoretical, and professional. The collection will also ask after the ways that academic institutions replicate the kinds of gendered abuses that individuals experience in other forms of relationship, such as partner abuse, abuse in marriage, and abuse in family structures, alongside the failures of various therapeutic models in these analogous scenarios.

The co-editors aim to reimagine the academic editorial process along feminist lines for this project, which will likely involve more communal forms of writing and re-writing than what is standard practice. For instance, we may orchestrate occasional virtual meetings among contributors, as we hope the project will function in the spirit of scholarly, activist, and advocacy frameworks.

Thus, we seek first-person accounts of all varieties of gendered abuse, harassment, and/or discrimination as experienced by women and LGBTQ individuals in academia. We welcome narratives

  • from all academic disciplines;
  • from any size or type of academic institution;
  • from academics at all career stages, from graduate students to senior scholars;
  • about all kinds of gendered abuse, including but not limited to sexual;
  • about events that occurred across multiple years of individuals’ careers, or singular potent events;
  • that focus entirely on personal narrative, and/or that incorporate relevant studies or theory;
  • from writers who want to attach their names to their pieces and those who wish to remain anonymous.

Please submit your 500-750 word abstract, brief c.v., and contact information to both volume editors (hollandm@newpaltz.edu and rohmanc@lafayette.edu) by April 1, 2022. And spread the word to friends and colleagues who might have their own stories to tell.

Mary K. Holland specializes in contemporary literature, theory, and women’s writing at SUNY New Paltz. Her most recent book is #MeToo and Literary Studies: Reading, Writing, and Teaching about Sexual Violence and Rape Culture (co-edited with Heather Hewett; Bloomsbury 2021). She is also the author of two monographs on contemporary lit (Bloomsbury, 2013 and 2020) and co-editor of an MLA volume in the Approaches to Teaching World Literature series (2019).

Carrie Rohman works in animal studies, critical theory, modernism, and performance studies at Lafayette College. Her plenary address at the 2021 Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf examined gendered abuse in academia. Rohman contributed to the “#MeToo and Modernism” cluster in Modernism/modernity (2020) and is Associate Editor at Contemporary Women’s Writing. Her most recent book is Choreographies of the Living: Bioaesthetics in Literature, Art, and Performance (Oxford 2018).

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International Conference

Childhood at War and Genocide:

Children’s experiences of conflict in the 20th and 21st century – Agency, Survival, Memory and Representation

Date: 24-26.10.2022

Location: Center for Holocaust Studies at the Leibniz Institute for Contemporary History (IfZ),
Munich, Germany

Children are the primary victims of wars, armed conflicts, and genocides. They perish first and in disproportionately large numbers.  Wars and genocides also destroy the family and family bonds, and that is so strikingly visible in the case of child survivors who are impacted for life with painful memories of the loss of parents, childhood, and community, and of displacement. Thanks to the last two decades of historical, sociological, anthropological, literary, and ethnographic research, scholars now know much more about the world of thinking, being, and feeling of Jewish and non-Jewish European children and youth, alongside their daily experiences, both during and in the aftermath of the Second World War.

The mass of scholarly works on Jewish and non-Jewish child survivors and youth of the Nazi era, and the studies of the ways young survivors were treated by relatives, adoptive parents, social workers, medical staff, and respective states in the aftermath of the Second World War, is constantly growing. However, large research gaps remain, especially concerning the German war in the East. Similarly, specific histories of child survivors of other genocides in the twenty century and beyond are lacking. But thanks to the recent endorsement of child-centered historical methods and interdisciplinary approaches, the experiences and memories of child survivors of the post-1945 wars and genocides have also begun to be investigated. This offers us a new and vital opportunity for systematic and focused comparative studies of timely topics such as the role of a child’s gender and agency as well as different social groups and resources that enabled the children to survive; family status, gender, and adoption of orphaned children in the aftermath of war and genocide; and the child survivors’ official state status, rehabilitation, education, and displacement, among others.

One of the main goals of the two-and-a-half-day international conference is to shed light on those topics and others, through comparative and transnational lenses. Our aim is not only to seek similarities and differences among cases but also to use one set of phenomena to understand the other. The conference organisers are interested in innovative contributions which tackle various historical and contemporary case studies of children and war and genocide. The organisers have three objectives. First, while the initial focus is on the Holocaust and the occupied European territories during the Second World War, we are also interested in taking a more global outlook at the experiences and representations of children who experienced, witnessed, and survived war and genocide during the twentieth and twenty-first century. Second, to explore similarities and differences in the experiences and life stories of displaced, orphaned, and also physically and mentally disabled young survivors of the Holocaust, and the genocides in Armenian, Rwandan, Cambodian, and Bosnian, among others. And third to examine the effect of war and genocide on children and childhood: on children’s emotions, needs and social identities; children’s social relations within family and friendship and long-life ties; and their role in the reconstruction of family in the aftermath of war and genocide.

The spectrum of possible topics is deliberately broad to allow room for newer approaches and new questions.

We especially welcome papers that relate to the following four thematic blocks:

1. The spaces of experience, agency, and survival of children and adolescents in wars and genocides.

2. The ideological wars against children: genocidal policies and practices and other forms of persecution of children by various political governments and state agents.

3. Similarities and differences in dealing with retrospective experiences of war and genocide. To what extent was it possible to inscribe and process what had been suffered in one’s own biography? To what extent were people sensitive to traumatic experiences of their children, and if so, which ones? What other ways and means of processing (film, literature, associations) exist? To what extent do states legally punish crimes committed against children? And which crimes and charges were in the center of attention? Finally, what consequences does the treatment of childhood in wars and genocides have for today’s culture of remembrance in the respective states?

4. Sources and testimonies: Children hardly leave any sources behind. The aim is to explore which sources and methods can be used to grasp and tell the story of childhood in war. We welcome ideas about hitherto little-known and unused sources. Limitations and methodological weaknesses can and should also be discussed.

To Apply:

We are seeking proposals for 15-20 minutes presentations in English. Applicants should send the title and abstract of their presentation (max. 350 words), a short biography (max. 200 words) including contact information, institutional affiliation, and a reference to 2-3 selected publications to zfhs@ifz-muenchen.de by 31 March 2022.

Invited participants will be notified of their acceptance in the first half of May 2022.

Further information:

Travel and accommodation costs for invited participants will be paid for by the Center for Holocaust Studies. The organisers hope that the conference will take place at the Leibniz Institute for Contemporary History, Munich, Germany. Given the uncertainty of the Covid-19 pandemic, we may also consider a hybrid or online format, or the potential postponement of the conference. A decision about this will be made in due time.

Organisers:

Joanna Michlic, UCL Centre for Collective Violence, Holocaust and Genocide Studies, IAS (UCL-ISA)

Yuliya von Saal, Leibniz Institute for Contemporary History (IfZ)

Anna Ullrich, Center for Holocaust Studies, Leibniz Institute for Contemporary History (IfZ)

Tobias Freimüller, Fritz Bauer Institute (FBI)

The conference is hosted by the Center for Holocaust Studies at the Leibniz Institute of Contemporary History in cooperation with the Fritz Bauer Institute and the Institute of Advanced Studies at University College London.

Contact Info:
Contact Email:
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Online
June 17-18, 2022
Border Crossings and Human Rights in Graphic Narratives
International Workshop:
Call for Papers
Organisers:
Olga Michael (University of Cyprus), Laurike in ’t Veld (Erasmus University Rotterdam)

This workshop aims to explore intersections between border crossings and human rights in fiction and non-fiction graphic narratives. According to Özgün E. Topak, ‘borderzones are spaces where human rights are suspended in favour of sovereign practices, and migrants are left to die’ (2014, 816). Border aesthetics, a theoretical lens through which borders can be examined, conceptualizes them as linguistic, cultural, social, political and spatial entities. Borders are also understood as enabling ‘b/ordering’ practices as well as the formation of ‘narratives or tropes [,] which can […] interrogate their including/excluding function’ (Wolfe and Schimanski 2017, 149). ‘B/ordering’ practices include, inter alia, stereotypical understandings of racially or religiously ‘othered’ male migrants as ‘monstrous’ terrorists, and, correspondingly, of female migrants as silent, passive victims within patriarchal, oppressive contexts from the micro-level of the family to the macro-level of the nation (see Griffiths 2015; Ticktin 2017).
This workshop will focus on graphic narratives that explore borders as sites of exclusion, while also navigating and/or commenting upon practices of ‘b/ordering.’ In addition, it will examine to what extent graphic narratives depicting human rights violations that occur during migratory experiences can indeed challenge, or if they reproduce the ‘including/excluding function’ of the border. In exploring human rights violations emerging during regular or irregular migration journeys, this workshop aims at unpacking the ways in which a human-rights perspective on the border can complicate its conceptualization. As such, it is concerned with the ‘friction and change [that appear] when borders and aesthetics rub against each other and change each other accordingly’ (Rosello and Wolfe 2017: 6), and the ways in which these frictions and changes become manifested in graphic narratives depicting human rights violations at the border.
Migration and detention comics have increasingly drawn academic attention (see Naghibi, Rifkind and Ty 2020; Rifkind 2020; Serrano 2021) and, likewise, representations of human rights violations in contexts of war, conflict, and genocide in comics and graphic novels have also triggered the publication of a significant body of scholarship (Earle 2017; In ’t Veld 2019; Nayar 2021). In an attempt to bring comics studies in migration and human rights together, we invite papers examining any aspect of human rights violations occurring in or enabled by borders, which are here understood as linguistic, cultural, social, political and/or spatial entities, and as enabling both positive interactions and ‘b/ordering’ practices. The questions on human rights and the border as a physical space and a conceptual and framing device that are to be explored during this workshop include the following:
·       To what extent does the comics form, itself based on borders that frame narrative fragments, enable nuanced representations of human rights as intersecting with border crossings?
·       How do the positions of the perpetrator, the victim and the bystander become negotiated in such cases?
·       How does Western humanitarianism become staged in and through borders?
·       What is the educational use and impact of graphic narratives displaying human rights violations occurring at and through the border in higher and/or secondary education?
·       What is the role of such graphic narratives in social justice?
Suggested topics include (but are not limited to):
·       Border aesthetics, human rights and graphic life narratives
·       Online graphic narratives, human rights and migration
·       Perpetrators at the border
·       Gender and perpetration
·       Victims at the border
·       Gender and human rights at the border
·       Space and human rights
·       Children’s rights
·       Western humanitarianism at the border
Please send your proposals of 250-300 words for presentations of no more than twenty minutes and a short bio note of 100-150 words to bordercrossingcomics@gmail.com by March 17th, 2022. Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by April 17th, 2022. The papers selected for the workshop will be published in a special issue of a peer-reviewed journal.

References:
Earle, H. 2017. Comics, Trauma, and the New Art of War. Jackson: U of Mississippi P.
Griffiths, M. 2015. ‘“Here Man is Nothing!:” Gender and Policy in an Asylum Context,’ Men and Masculinities 18(4): 468-88.
In ‘t Veld, L. 2019. The Representation of Genocide in Graphic Novels: Considering the Role of Kitsch. Cham: Palgrave Macmillan.
Naghibi, N., C. Rifkind and E. Ty, eds. 2020. ‘Introduction: Migration, Exile and Diaspora in Graphic Life Narratives,’ a/b: Auto/biography Studies 35(2): 295-304.
Nayar, P. 2021. The Human Rights Graphic Novel: Drawing it Just Right. London: Routledge.
Rifkind, C. 2020. ‘Migrant Detention Comics and the Aesthetic Technologies of Compassion,’ in Documenting Trauma in Comics: Traumatic Pasts, Embodied Histories, and Graphic Reportage, D. Davies and C. Rifkind, eds. Cham: Palgrave Macmillan.
Rosello, M. and S. F. Wolfe. 2017. ‘Introduction,’ in J. Schimanski and S. F. Wolfe (eds.), Border Aesthetics: Concepts and Intersections. New York: Berghahn, pp. 1-24.
Schimanski, J. and S. F. Wolfe, eds. 2017. ‘Intersections: A Conclusion in the Form of a Glossary,’ in Border Aesthetics: Concepts and Intersections. New York: Berghahn, pp. 147-70.
Serrano, L. N., ed. 2021. Immigrants and Comics: Graphic Spaces of Remembrance, Transaction, and Mimesis. New York: Routledge.
Ticktin, M. 2017. ‘A World Without Innocence,’ American Ethnologist: Journal of the American Ethnological Society 44(4): 577-90.
Topak, E. Ö. 2014. ‘The Biopolitical Border in Practice: Surveillance and Death at the Greece–Turkey Borderzones,’ Environment and Planning D: Society and Space 32(5): 815-33.

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Colleagues,

The next of my monthly webinars, Let’s Talk Books at NMU, will feature Melissa Homestead discussing her recent book, The Only Wonderful Things: The Creative Partnership of Willa Cather and Edith Lewis. 

The webinar will be Friday, March 18 at 1:00 Eastern time. I’d love it if you could join us. The registration link is below.

Lynn Domina

You are invited to a Zoom webinar.
When: Mar 18, 2022 01:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
Topic: Let’s Talk Books at NMU – Melissa Homestead

Please register:
https://nmu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Rp0DfO6vR6GLA8u22e4cYg

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

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College Language Association and Black Auto/Biography

Modern Language Association Convention, January 5-8, 2023, San Francisco, USA

Deadline for Submissions: Tuesday, 15 March 2022

Black life writing takes many forms—print, performative, visual, archival. How do different methodologies and modes constitute the work of “writing” black lives? Collaboration with College Language Association Forum. Please submit 300-word abstracts and bios to Joycelyn Moody.

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New Perspectives on the “Confessing Animal”

Berlin, 22-23 July 2022

Deadline for Submissions: 15 March, 2022

Few critics have questioned Foucault’s diagnosis of “confessing animal[s]” (or “beast[s] of confession,” which would be a far better translation of the French bête d’aveu). The more provocative of Foucault’s claims has likewise gone largely unchallenged: Namely, Foucault did not only argue that we have been conditioned into spilling our guts in public and in private, in speech and in writing—he also claimed that we have been tricked into believing that this constant and supposedly voluntary self-disclosure constitutes a rebellious liberation from taboos and censorship. “One has to be completely taken in by this internal ruse of confession,” Foucault writes, to believe that disclosing the most intimate aspects of one’s life to public scrutiny is proof of “freedom” from oppression.

Never has Foucault’s diagnosis been more relevant than it is today. The first two decades of the twenty-first century have seen an exponential growth of confessing, primarily, though not exclusively, in the vast digital archive of social media. Whereas twentieth-century confessional phenomena have received considerable attention from literary and cultural critics, the more recent manifestations of confessional culture remain largely unexplored.

On the other hand (though not unrelatedly), social media has also been linked to a new kind of social justice activism that takes place primarily online, as well as having been accused of the rise of identity politics more broadly. While there is good reason to remain skeptical about the media-driven publicizing and commodification of the most intimate details of people’s lives, especially this latter development demonstrates the urgent need we currently have for holding individuals (and other legal entities, such as governments or corporations) accountable for their actions. Confession, before the Romantic cult of subjectivity reduced it to “mere” self-expression, provided exactly this: a mechanism whereby people can not only be held accountable for their actions but also faced with the consequences of those actions, and, eventually, be released from the burden of their pasts.

These tensions are explored by DISCLOSURE, an interdisciplinary research group founded by a Ph.D. candidate, Sonja Pyykkö (Freie Universität Berlin), with master’s students from various departments represented within the Berlin University Alliance. Drawing on the group leader’s doctoral research project, which examines confession in the combined perspective of literary theory, history, and philosophy, members of DISCLOSURE have been investigating confessions across media since the spring of 2021.

We are inviting participants for a two-day symposium over a summer weekend in Berlin, set to explore the current state and future directions of the “confessing animal,” as Michel Foucault’s famous diagnosis from The History of Sexuality (1976/78) goes. Foucault was notably suspicious of what he saw as a ritual of voluntary self-subjugation, both in its ancient Christian and contemporary Freudian manifestations.

After decades of Foucault-inspired suspicious criticism, DISCLOSURE seeks to rethink confession in light of the crises of accountability that are becoming the hallmark of twenty-first century social justice projects. Like Foucault, we think that confession is indeed integral to secular modernity, but unlike Foucault, we do not think that this is an altogether bad thing: Rather than a dated and coercive ritual of self-policing, we take confession be a secular means of moral self-inquiry and an aesthetic of self-fashioning focused on character, defined by a set of moral values and principles—ethos.

For our first symposium, we invite scholars working on adjacent topics to join us in developing new critical approaches to the study of confession. We especially welcome comparative and interdisciplinary approaches and perspectives broadening our understanding of what constitutes “confession” in different 21st century contexts. Proposals for papers, to be presented either in workshop or panel discussion format, may wish to address the
following areas:

  • Confession in literature: contemporary poetry, essay, memoir, autofiction and autotheory, narrative nonfiction
  • Confession in performance and media: true crime, podcasts, vlogs and blogs, video games, social media, stand-up comedy, spoken word, performance art
  • Confession in society: social justice movements (e.g., Me Too, Black Lives Matter), identity politics (e.g., LGBTQI+), institutional and incumbent confession (e.g., churches, governments, corporations)

Junior researchers, including master’s students, are likewise encouraged to submit an abstract. Join us in asking what it means to confess in the twenty-first century!

Deadline for abstracts: 15 March 2022

This project is funded by the Berlin University Alliance.

Contact Info:

Abstracts for papers (max. 300 words) must be sent to Sonja Pyykkö (pyykko@gsnas.fu-berlin.de) and Elizabeth Neumann (claraelin95@zedat.fu-berlin.de) by March 15, 2022.

For enquiries, please contact Elizabeth Neumann, claraelin95@zedat.fu-berlin.de.

Organizing committee: Sonja Pyykkö (Graduate School of North American Studies, Freie Universität Berlin), Elizabeth Neumann, Felix Fischer, Konstantin Helm, Hannah Maier-Katkin, Dilayda Tülübaş, Metin Turgut.

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Three MLA 2022 Panels from the Life Writing Forum

January 5–8, 2023

San Francisco, California

Deadlines listed below

Joan Didion as Memoirist:
Known for her journalism and novels, Didion also wrote revelatory memoirs. What do they tell us about the work of grieving and parenting; of self-fashioning; of style? 300-word abstracts by 3/5/2022. Contact email: Angela Ards, ardsa@bc.edu

Planetary Lives: 

The 2019 memorial for Iceland’s Okjökull glacier suggests a question: how and why might life writing represent nonhuman, nonanimal existence to testify to climate crisis? 250-word abstracts and short bios by 3/1/2022. Contact email: Megan Brown, megan.brown@drake.edu
Auto/biographies of/as Work:
How do forms of auto/biography capture, create, and/or critique experiences and conditions of work and labour? How do authors view the work of auto/biography itself? Submit 300-word proposals & short bios by 3/7/2022. Contact email: Laurie McNeill, laurie.mcneill@ubc.ca

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Looking Backward, Working Forward: Contemporary Life Writing and the Queer/Trans Past

deadline for submissions: 
March 1, 2022
Megan Paslawski / MLA 2023
contact email:

What strategies are contemporary life writers using to approach queer/trans pasts that remain unrecognized or unrecognizable? Possible topics may include archival silences, biofiction, LGBTQ childhoods and queer temporality, intergenerational mentorship, HIV/AIDS’ legacy, and more.

This call for papers is for a special session at the Modern Language Association 2023 conference, which means that it is a non-guaranteed panel. Please submit 250-word abstracts and CVs to Megan Paslawski (Queens College, CUNY) to be considered for the panel proposal.

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CFP: Domestic Goods: Silence speaks in our interiors, objects, clothing, and keepsakes. (Italian-Canadian perspectives)

CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF ITALIAN STUDIES

June 2- 5, 2022 Annual Conference

https://canadianassociationforitalianstudies.org/

What items do we cherish? Which items do we pass on? Typically, an inheritance item may be attached to a monetary value. What if the object’s value is more in the form of palpable memory? Can the mundane domestic goods of a pot or colander speak of a mother, or the alarm clock speak of a father? What resonates in the prosaic realm? This session will draw on autotopography (Gonzalez), the archive (Derrida), vibrant matter (Bennett), atmospheric attunements (Stewart) and thing theory (Brown).

What domestic goods speak to the heirs of Italian immigrants? How can we speak of intersectional identities in Italian immigrants’ children, grandchildren, and great children? The session will call upon the first (1900-1918), second (1950-1970) and third (1980-onwards) waves of Italian immigrants to Canada.

The goals of this session are to:

  1. Welcome papers addressing themes surrounding domesticity, domestic goods, and the archive,
  2. Create a network of scholars and community members interested in intersectional identity, memory, interiors, objects, clothing and keepsakes and to,
  3. Produce a visually creative anthology of domestic goods and narratives and to,
  4. To support a Call for Papers, for a possible publication in a special issue of the journal Italian Canadiana, University of Toronto.

If you are interested in participating, please send a 350- word abstract and short bio before February 28, 2022:

Lorella Di Cintio, PhD

Ryerson University (renaming in progress)

Toronto, Ontario, CANADA

Email: ldicintio@ryerson.ca

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Transdisciplinary Trauma Studies: Trauma Through Contemporary and Historical Perspectives
https://summeruniversity.ceu.edu/courses/transdisciplinary-trauma-studies-trauma-through-contemporary-and-historical-perspectives

Central European University, Summer University Course
Budapest, July 11–16, 2022
Application deadline: 28 February 2022

The course will show how trauma is present in various areas of social and cultural life; how trauma-informed approaches help understand processes of othering and traumatization, and how they can help in building resilience. We aim to make our students familiar with innovative approaches in studying trauma in different academic fields, and provide them with capacities necessary for developing greater empathy: we would like our students to acquire knowledge and also to develop an awareness of the complexity of how trauma is interwoven into enduring forms of conflict or oppression, and how the long-term impact of trauma is present in our own time.

Director: Anna Menyhért
Faculty: Gillian Eagle, Thomas Fetzer, Gina Donoso, Mykola Makhortykh, Annie St. John-Stark

Co-funded by the Open Society University Network (OSUN)

——————————————–
Prof. Dr. Anna Menyhért
Professor of Trauma Studies, The University of Jewish Studies, Budapest, HU
Summer University Course Director, Central European University, Vienna, AT–Budapest, HU

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Intimate Politics in Anglophone Women’s Writing

(University of Paris-Nanterre, 23-24 September 2022)

An international conference organized by FAAAM (CREA, EA 370)

In nineteenth-century romantic literature, especially poetry and personal writings, the notion of intimacy was understood as springing from the depths of an individual, untainted by cultural forces (hence closer to nature). Yet, as a number of studies have shown—most notably Foucault—intimate relationships are the product of social power structures deriving from a patriarchal gender hierarchy and reinforced by class and ethnic divides. The second-wave feminist slogan, “the personal is political,” coined by Carol Hanisch in 1969, drew our attention to the fact that aspects of women’s lives—housework, sex, familial relationships, etc. —were shaped by broader forces. We therefore invite scholars to examine “the personal is political” in all forms of women’s writings in English.

In Cold Intimacies: The Making of Emotional Capitalism (2007), Eva Illouz argues that the gender divisions that replicate the public and private spheres as well as divisions of labor are also based on emotions, without which men and women would not reproduce their roles and identities. An intense emotional culture participated in the development of capitalism. Twentieth-century America in particular witnessed the invasion of the public sphere by (Freudian) therapeutic discourse while, on the other hand, the private sphere was invaded by economic discourse. Thus, the private sphere of emotions was subjected to intense rationalization.

Furthermore, the multiplicity of sexual and gender expressions in the twenty-first century challenges normative assumptions of intimacy that privilege heterosexual relationships and the biological family unit, consider binary cisgender identities as given, and view sexual or romantic desire as the only ground for developing intimate relationships.

We invite participants to submit proposals treating the following themes:

1) The disclosure of intimacy as a double-edged sword for women in patriarchal cultures: empowerment, emancipation, but also increased vulnerability/exposure, backlash, commodification of intimacy. The #Metoo movement has considerably amplified the risks and benefits of disclosure. Women’s personal writings are especially subjected to this double bind.

What definitions of intimacy do women’s writings offer? How are the paradoxes of intimacy interwoven in women’s writings, negotiated within the constraints of gender, ethnicity and class? How can women writers represent the experience of intimacy (between resistance to disclosure and the need/desire to recount)? What innovative narratives of intimacy do queer identities give birth to?

2) Intimate spaces: one of the ways in which we experience and conceptualize intimacy is through space (public and private spheres, and so on). Intimate relationships involve ideas of proximity and distance. Moreover, intimacy creates space. Historically, the birth of a private, intimate culture in the eighteenth century correlates with the transformation of the private abode: beds began to be relocated to more private rooms, and separate spaces for hygiene were created, to name but a few changes. Just as social spaces are ideologically constructed so that they reproduce gender divisions and roles, so too are intimate spaces. Thus, home has been considered as the female domain because of the representation of women as carers/nurturers. This representation conceals power relationships, and the fact that intimate spaces, like any other space, are heterogeneous and precarious (Rose 1993). Investing women with the role of carer/nurturer grew out of their capacity to reproduce, the uterine space being a site of much conflict and contention. Perceived as the presumed source of hysteria, of women’s assumed propensity for the domestic (Erikson’s inner space) and of the promise/threat of maternity, also described as the cave of the lost Sibyl in Mary Shelley’s introduction to The Last Man (1826), the uterus is often used as a metaphor for literary gestation. The body, and particularly the female body, with its convex and concave forms, its recesses and enclosed spaces, is often associated with the private and the intimate. As Gilbert and Gubar have pointed out, spatial imagery of enclosure and escape has characterized much writing by women (Madwoman 1979: 83, 85). From Charlotte Perkins Gilman (Yellow Wallpaper, 1892) to Margaret Atwood (The Handmaid’s Tale, 1985), heroines have been restricted to rooms and roles. For female artists, the presence or absence of intimate spaces has affected their creative output, as Virginia Woolf powerfully demonstrated in A Room of One’s Own. Because of the elusive nature of spatial intimacy, women writers have sometimes imagined utopian/dystopian worlds to represent it. In Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain’s feminist utopia, Sultana’s Dream, women rule the world as society lives peacefully and prospers through their inventions of solar ovens, flying cars, and cloud condensers, which offer abundant, clean water to the population of “Ladyland.” And the men, who are deemed “fit for nothing,” are shut inside their homes. Participants may also question the role of virtual spaces in favoring/impeding intimacy.

3) Narrative intimacy: According to Lauren Berlant, the concept of intimacy rests upon the development of a story and a narrative. As the reader is not passive in the construction of meaning, reading can be viewed as an intimate experience. Creating and entering a relationship with a reader is sometimes a very strong motivation behind the act of writing—Ruth Ozeki has spoken of writing “embodied prose in order to elicit the same kinds of strong, physical, emotional responses, from the reader” (“Literature is a Kind of Mirror,” 2016). On the poetic side, in milk and honey (2014) and the sun and her flowers (2017), the “instapoet” rupi kaur devised a poetic space combining text and image to recreate personal experiences of – occasionally traumatic – intimacy, which readers have shared and responded to. What kinds of “engagement” (Rita Felski 2008) can occur and develop throughout the reading process and beyond it? To what extent is intimacy created by narrative techniques? What issues of power are at play between (female) author and reader/public? What narrative voices shape intimacy? Participants may also examine experimental, genre-defying works that women have used to turn intimacy and emotion into political concerns.

 

Genres to consider: theatre, poetry, personal writings (diaries, letters, memoirs), first person novels, autofiction, science fiction, epistolary novels, experimental, genre-defying works, prison narratives….

Please send a 300-400-word abstract (for a 20-minute presentation followed by 10 minutes of question/discussion) with a short bio-bibliography to: faaam.nanterre@gmail.com

 FAAAM (Femmes Auteurs Anglo-AMéricaines) is a research seminar whose members share an interest in women’s writing and gender. We have published, in the wake of our two previous conferences,

Women’s Life Writing and the Practice of Reading (Palgrave Macmillan 2018)

https://link.springer.com/book/9783319752464

Text and Image in Women’s Life Writing: Picturing the Female Self (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)

https://link.springer.com/book/9783030848743

Deadline for submissions: February 28th, 2022

Notification of acceptance: March 31st, 2022

Language of the conference: English

Organizing and Scientific Committee:

Claire Bazin (Université Paris-Nanterre), Nicoleta Alexoae-Zagni (Université Paris 8 Vincennes-Saint-Denis), Valérie Baisnée (Université Paris-Saclay), Corinne Bigot (Université Toulouse – Jean-Jaurès), Stephanie Genty (Université d’Évry-Paris/Saclay), Nathalie Saudo-Welby (Université de Picardie Jules Verne)

Select bibliography:

 

Berlant, Lauren, Ed. Intimacy. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000.

Boling, Patricia. Privacy and the Politics of Intimate Life. Cornell UP 1996.

Cooke, Jennifer, Ed. Scenes of Intimacy: Reading, Writing and Theorizing Contemporary Literature. London, New York: Bloomsbury, 2013.  

Dimen, Muriel. Sexuality, Intimacy, Power. Hillsdale, NJ: The Analytic Press, 2003.

Felski, Rita. Uses of Literature. Malden, MA & Oxford: Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2008.

Foucault, Michel. The History of Sexuality: An Introduction, tr. Robert Hurley (Histoire de la sexualité, vol. 1, 1976; New York: Random House, 1978).

Illouz, Eva. Cold Intimacies: The Making of Emotional Capitalism. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press, 2007.

Miguel, Christina. Personal Relationships and Intimacy in the Age of Social Media. Palgrave, 2018.

Rose, Gillian. Feminism & Geography: The Limits of Geographical Knowledge. University of Minnesota Press, 1993.

*

Récit de vie féminin dans l’Europe de l’Est et du Sud-Est/
Women’s Life Writing in Eastern and South-Eastern Europe/
Literatură auto/biografică feminină în Europa de Est şi de Sud-Est

Call for Papers
In the form of memoirs, autobiographies, diaries or correspondence, or given a literary spin as autofiction and biofiction, the experiences of East and South-East European women during wartimes and under the oppressive regimes of the twentieth century (a period laden with contrasts, which in the West was hailed as “a century of women”, Rowbotham 1997, but also framed as an “age of testimony”, Felman and Laub 1992) have been surfacing in the past two decades. The transmission of these narratives followed sinuous paths, taking both verbal and non-verbal forms, relying on both “filial” and “affiliative” networks (Hirsch 2012), and coming from both female victims and female perpetrators (Schwab 2010). If deciphering most of what came to light requires the careful eye of a literary or cultural studies scholar, the broad perspective of a historian, or the attentive ear of a psychoanalyst, some phenomena of resurfacing bring back not only traumatic legacies, but also extremist ones, pushing towards repeating a history of perpetrations (Pető 2020), a concerning tendency which calls for a political scientist’s perspective.
The persistence of women’s psychic wounds, passed on through “postmemory” (Hirsch 1997 & 2012) has generated  “haunting legacies” (Schwab 2010) as it shaped the next generation’s unconscious reflexes, and has found a forceful outlet in works of life writing coming either from second-generation witnesses or from the publication of previously censored works by victims of totalitarian regimes. The transmission of these narratives happened against the backdrop of an uneven social progress, which created gender gaps and accentuated women’s vulnerabilities, despite the presence of emancipation movements, which received official support from some political regimes.
This issue will look at how traumatic memories (lived, inherited, or transmitted) are transformed through the aesthetic agency of literature (sometimes with additional support from photography or visual art), thus building a safe space where the revisiting of the past allows room for both reflection and learning. The volume focuses on a triad of aspects of life writing: witnessing (following distinctions made by Derrida and Agamben, and recently refined by van der Heiden 2019, between the Latin testis, superstes, martyr – derived from the Greek martus – and auctor), enduring (which brings together suffering and duration or survival), and recovering (connoting healing in the intransitive form, but also rescuing or preserving in the transitive). We also want to take into account the influence of censorship and self-censorship on the process of witnessing and the way “missing memory” (Schwartz, Weller, and Winkel, 2021) finds a compensation in fictional forms of life-writing. Contributions should cover the large life writing spectrum (biographical and autobiographical narratives, memoirs, diaries, letters, biofiction, or autofiction), including posthumously published or retrospectively written accounts.
The memory of past trauma or past guilt seeped in through gestures, images, whispers, storytelling, silences. Life writing (broadly conceived to include photography, correspondence, and archival material) has offered the main  instrument to access, reassemble, and give meaning to these traces of history. Deciphering the “communicative legacies of trauma and resilience” (Hannah Klieger, in Mitroiu 2018), the relationship between memory and history (Radstone and Hodgkin 2003), but also between witnessing and literature (Felman and Laub 1992, van der Heiden 2019), are some of our main goals for this special issue. The impact of local context on form (Mrozik & Tippner 2021) has modelled the categories of life writing in Eastern and South-Eastern Europe, providing a vantage point for formulating new theories on the development of genre. We too are very interested in highlighting the local and regional background and the specificity of these political, social and cultural environments, with their impact on women’s life-writing.
We invite submissions on topics including, but not limited to:

  • The value of testimony, persistence, and survival in women’s life writing and of life-based literary narratives (biofictions and autofictions) as related to historical traumas;
  • The role of literature, but also hybrid genres (life writing accounts including photography and visual art) in recovering Eastern and South-Eastern European female experiences of the twentieth century and in recording the postmemory of these experiences in contemporary times;
  • Politics, women’s emancipation movements and their backlashes: 19th century origins, Marxism and the Cold War.
  • The involvement of women from Eastern and South-Eastern Europe in political movements (leftist or rightist adherence, even extremist groups) and, if the case, the resulting traumatic repression as it is portrayed in various media.
  • The impact of the World Wars and the Cold War as well as communist/fascist repression and censorship on the evolution of women’s life writing and memory preservation;
  • The body as site of trauma, recovery, and witnessing in women’s life writing that reflects the historical atrocities of the twentieth century;
  • The transition from suffering witness (martus) to storytelling witness (auctor) in women’s life writing;
  • Establishing transnational connections and routes of memory within Eastern and South-Eastern European women’s life writing;
  • The conflicted identities of descendants and / or close friends of victims but also of perpetrators of historical trauma.

Please submit your proposals to the editors as follows:
Proposals on Romanian life-writing, Cold War and totalitarian contexts: Dr. Andrada Fătu-Tutoveanu, Lecturer, andrada.pintilescu@fspac.ro
Proposals on Biofiction and Autofiction, Postmemory: Laura Cernat, PhD candidate, cernat.laura@kuleuven.be
Proposals on South-East European and Eastern European literature:  Dr. Bavjola Shatro, Associate Professor- shatro.uamd.edu@gmail.com
Deadlines for submissions: ABSTRACTS  (around 300 words): February 10, 2022.
FULL PAPERS (around 8000-9000 words): June 30, 2022.

Bibliography:
Felman, Shoshana, and Laub, Dori. Testimony: Crises of Witnessing in Literature, Psychoanalysis, and History. New York & London: Routledge, 1992.
Hirsch, Marianne. Family Frames: Photography, Narrative, and Postmemory. Cambridge, MA & London: Harvard University Press, 1997.
Hirsch, Marianne. The Generation of Postmemory: Writing and Visual Culture After the Holocaust. New York: Columbia University Press, 2012.
Mitroiu, Simona (ed.). Women’s Narratives and the Postmemory of Displacement in Central and Eastern Europe. Cham: Palgrave, 2018.
Mrozik, Agnieszka, and Tippner, Anja. “Remembering Late Socialism in Autobiographical Novels and Autofictions from Central and Eastern Europe: Introduction”. European Journal of Life Writing. Vol 10, 2021, pp. 1-14.
Pető, Andrea. The Women of the Arrow Cross Party: Invisible Hungarian Perpetrators in the Second World War. Cham: Palgrave, 2020.
Radstone, Susannah, and Hodgkin, Katharine. Regimes of Memory. London & New York: Routledge, 2003.
Rowbotham, Sheila. A Century of Women: The History of Women in Britain and the United States. London: Viking, 1997.
Schwab, Gabrielle. Haunting Legacies: Violent Histories and Transgenerational Trauma. New York: Columbia University Press, 2010.
Schwartz, Matthias, Weller, Nina, and Winkel, Heike. After Memory: World War II in Contemporary Eastern European Literatures. Berlin/ Boston: De Gruyter, 2021.
Van der Heiden, Gert-Jan. The Voice of Misery: A Continental Philosophy of Testimony. New York: SUNY Press, 2019.

Récit de vie féminin dans l’Europe de l’Est et du Sud-Est/
Women’s Life Writing in Eastern and South-Eastern Europe/
Literatură auto/biografică feminină în Europa de Est şi de Sud-Est

Appel à contributions
Soit sous la forme de mémoires, d’autobiographies, de journaux ou de volumes de correspondance, soit recevant une tournure littéraire en tant qu’autofiction et biofiction, les expériences des femmes de l’Europe de l’Est et du Sud-Est en temps de guerre ou pendant les régimes oppressifs du vingtième siècle (période pleine de contrastes, ayant été célébrée comme « un siècle des femmes » dans l’Occident – Rowbotham 1997, mais aussi présentée comme un « âge du témoignage » – Felman and Laub 1992) n’ont cessé d’émerger durant les deux dernières décennies. La transmission de ces récits a suivi des voies sinueuses, prenant des formes parfois verbales et parfois non-verbales, soutenue autant par des réseaux « filiaux » que par des réseaux « affiliatifs » (Hirsch 2012) et provenant tant du côté des femmes victimisées que de celui des femmes coupables d’atrocités (Schwab 2010). Si l’interprétation des documents qui sont parus récemment dans ce domaine serait une tâche pour l’œil soigneux du spécialiste en littérature ou de l’expert en études culturelles, entrainant également la perspective vaste de l’historien ou peut-être l’oreille attentive du psychanalyste, il existe également des phénomènes de réémergence qui réaniment non seulement la mémoire culturelle traumatique, mais également un héritage extrémiste, engendrant la tendance de répéter des violences historiques (Pető 2020), une évolution inquiétante dont l’analyse réclame une expertise en sciences politiques.
La rémanence des blessures psychiques que les femmes ont transmises à leurs proches à travers la « post-mémoire » (Hirsch 1997 & 2012) a généré des « héritages obsédants » (« haunting legacies », Schwab 2010), structurant les réflexes inconscients de la génération suivante. De telles expériences traumatisantes, soit héritées soit vécues, ont trouvé un exutoire puissant dans l’écriture de témoignage pratiquée par la génération des enfants des victimes ou dans la publication des ouvrages autobiographiques ou biographiques émanant directement des victimes des régimes totalitaires et à l’époque censurés. La transmission de ces récits s’est passée dans le contexte d’un progrès social inégalement réparti, qui a créé des disparités de genre et a accentué la vulnérabilité des femmes, malgré l’existence de mouvements d’émancipation, qui ont, pour certains d’entre eux, bénéficié du soutien officiel des régimes politiques.
Ce numéro thématique se penchera sur la manière dont les souvenirs traumatisants (soient-ils vécus, hérités, ou transmis) sont transformés par l’agencement esthétique propre à la littérature (parfois aidée par la photographie ou l’art visuel), afin de construire une zone neutre où la reconsidération du passé donne lieu à la réflexion et, par la même occasion, à l’apprentissage. Le volume se concentre sur une triade d’aspects de l’écriture de vie : témoigner (suivant les distinctions, théorisées par Derrida et Agamben, et récemment affinées par van der Heiden 2019, entre les termes latins testis, superstes, martyr (dérivé du grecque martus), et auctor), survivre (survivre à une expérience traumatisante, donc souffrir, mais aussi résister, durer), et rétablir (connotant une guérison dans sa forme réflexive, mais aussi l’effort de récupérer ou de préserver la vérité du passé, dans sa forme transitive). Nous voudrions tenir compte également de l’influence de la censure et de l’autocensure dans le processus de témoignage et de la manière dont la « mémoire manquante » (« missing memory », Schwartz, Weller et Winkel 2021) trouve une compensation dans les modalités fictionnelles de l’écriture de vie. Les contributeurs sont encouragés à couvrir l’ensemble de formes de l’écriture de vie (des récits biographiques et autobiographiques, mémoires, journaux, correspondance, biofiction ou autofiction), y compris des récits publiés à titre posthume ou écrits en rétrospective.
Le souvenir des expériences traumatisantes passées ou d’une culpabilité traumatisante s’infiltre à travers des gestes, des images, des murmures, des histoires, des silences. Les récits de vie (conçus plus généralement comme l’ensemble de techniques de sauvegarde de la mémoire, dont font partie la photographie, la correspondance, les matériaux d’archive) ont fourni l’outil principal pour accéder à ces traces de l’histoire, les rassembler et leur donner du sens. Déchiffrer les « héritages communicationnels du traumatisme et de la résilience » (« communicative legacies of trauma and resilience », Hannah Klieger, dans Mitroiu 2018), ainsi que la relation entre la mémoire et l’histoire (Radstone et Hodgkin 2003), mais également entre le témoignage et la littérature (Felman et Laub 1992, van der Heiden 2019), figurent parmi les objectifs principaux de ce numéro thématique. L’impact du contexte local sur l’aspect formel de l’écriture (Mrozik & Tippner 2012) a modelé les catégories du récit de vie en l’Europe de l’Est et du Sud-Est, offrant un nouvel angle pour formuler des théories innovatrices sur le développement du genre. Nous cherchons également des articles qui mettent l’accent sur le contexte local et régional et sur la spécificité de ces milieux politiques, sociaux, et culturels, dans la mesure où ils influencent le récit de vie féminin.
Nous invitons des contributions sur des thèmes liés au récit de vie féminin dans l’Europe de l’Est et du Sud-Est, parmi lesquels nous recommandons :

  • La valeur du témoignage, de la persévérance et de la survie dans les récits de vie écrits par des femmes ou dans la littérature féminine inspirée par la vie réelle (biofiction ou autofiction) dans leur rapport avec les expériences historiques traumatisantes ;
  • Le rôle que la littérature, mais aussi les genres hybrides (les récits de vie dans leur ensemble, y compris sous la forme de la photographie ou de l’art visuel), jouent dans le rétablissement / la récupération des expériences féminines du vingtième siècle dans l’Europe de l’Est et du Sud-Est et l’impact de ces pratiques sur l’inscription de la post-mémoire de ces expériences dans l’archive contemporaine ;
  • La scène politique, les mouvements d’émancipation et leurs contrecoups : les origines de ces tendances dans le dix-neuvième siècle, notamment les discussions sur l’héritage du marxisme pendant la Guerre Froide ;
  • L’implication des femmes de l’Europe de l’Est et du Sud-Est dans des mouvements politiques (de gauche ou de droite, y compris les adhésions à des groupes extrémistes) et, selon le cas, la répression traumatisante qui s’en est suivie, telle qu’elle est dépeinte dans les différents médias.
  • L’impact des Guerres Mondiales, de la Guerre Froide, de la répression ainsi que de la censure communiste ou fasciste sur l’évolution des récits de vie féminins et sur la conservation de la mémoire collective féminine ;
  • Le corps comme lieu de l’expérience traumatisantes, du rétablissement et du témoignage dans le récit de vie féminin qui relate les atrocités historiques du vingtième siècle ;
  • Le passage du rôle du témoin souffrant (martus) à celui du témoin racontant (auctor) dans le récit de vie féminin ;
  • Les connections transnationales et les routes de la mémoire à travers le récit de vie féminin dans l’Europe de l’Est et du Sud-Est ;
  • Les identités conflictuelles des descendants et/ou des proches des victimes, mais également des descendants et des proches des femmes coupables d’atrocités historiques.

Veuillez remettre vos propositions aux éditeurs selon les catégories suivantes :
Les propositions concernant le récit de vie en Roumanie, l’expérience de la Guerre Froide, et les contextes totalitaires : Dr. Andrada Fătu-Tutoveanu, chargée de cours, andrada.pintilescu@fspac.ro
Les propositions sur la biofiction, l’autofiction, et la post-mémoire: Laura Cernat, doctorante, cernat.laura@kuleuven.be
Les propositions concernant la littérature de l’Europe de l’Est et du Sud-Est: Dr. Bavjola Shatro, conférencière – shatro.uamd.edu@gmail.com
Date limite pour remettre les propositions (environ 300 mots): 10 février 2022.
Date limite pour la remise des contributions (environ 8000-9000 mots): 30 juin 2022.

Bibliographie:
Felman, Shoshana, and Laub, Dori. Testimony: Crises of Witnessing in Literature, Psychoanalysis, and History. New York & London: Routledge, 1992.
Hirsch, Marianne. Family Frames: Photography, Narrative, and Postmemory. Cambridge, MA & London: Harvard University Press, 1997.
Hirsch, Marianne. The Generation of Postmemory: Writing and Visual Culture After the Holocaust. New York: Columbia University Press, 2012.
Mitroiu, Simona (ed.). Women’s Narratives and the Postmemory of Displacement in Central and Eastern Europe. Cham: Palgrave, 2018.
Mrozik, Agnieszka, and Tippner, Anja. “Remembering Late Socialism in Autobiographical Novels and Autofictions from Central and Eastern Europe: Introduction”. European Journal of Life Writing. Vol 10, 2021, pp. 1-14.
Pető, Andrea. The Women of the Arrow Cross Party: Invisible Hungarian Perpetrators in the Second World War. Cham: Palgrave, 2020.
Radstone, Susannah, and Hodgkin, Katharine. Regimes of Memory. London & New York: Routledge, 2003.
Rowbotham, Sheila. A Century of Women: The History of Women in Britain and the United States. London: Viking, 1997.
Schwab, Gabrielle. Haunting Legacies: Violent Histories and Transgenerational Trauma. New York: Columbia University Press, 2010.
Schwartz, Matthias, Weller, Nina, and Winkel, Heike. After Memory: World War II in Contemporary Eastern European Literatures. Berlin/ Boston: De Gruyter, 2021.
Van der Heiden, Gert-Jan. The Voice of Misery: A Continental Philosophy of Testimony. New York: SUNY Press, 2019.

Literatură auto/biografică feminină în Europa de Est şi de Sud-Est
Women’s Life Writing in Eastern and South-Eastern Europe/
Récit de vie féminin dans l’Europe de l’Est et du Sud-Est/

Apel la contribuţii
Fie că a luat forma memoriilor, autobiografiilor, jurnalelor sau coresponţei ori a îmbrăcat forme ficţionalizate (autoficţiune ori bioficţiune), experienţa feminină din perioada războaielor mondiale şi a regimurilor opresive din secolul XX în spaţiul est şi sud-est european a ieşit la suprafaţă şi s-a impus în peisajul editorial al ultimelor două decenii. O perioadă a contrastelor pe planul emancipării, secolul XX a fost celebrat în Occident ca un „secol feminin” („a century of women”, Rowbotham 1997), dar în acelaşi timp a fost considerat o „eră a mărturiilor” („age of testimony”, Felman & Laub 1992). Transmiterea istoriilor personale din această epocă a urmat trasee sinuoase, în forme orale sau scrise, bazându-se pe reţele „filiale”şi „afiliative” (Hirsch 2012), venind atât de la victimele feminine ale diferitelor regimuri opresive cât şi de la alte figuri (în special feminine) care au dus mai departe mărturia victimelor directe (Schwab 2010).  În cursul descifrării acestor istorii personale publicate în ultimele decenii (şi prezentând interes pentru multiple discipline, de la studiile literare şi cele culturale la istorie sau psihanaliză) iese la lumină nu doar memoria culturală traumatică, ci şi, în egală măsură, o conservare şi reemergenţă a extremismului. În unele contexte, aceasta din urmă a putut da naştere unei tendinţe de a repeta violenţe istorice (Pető 2020), o direcţie îngrijorătoare care solicită o perspectivă politologică specializată.
Persistenţa unor traume, transmise apropiaţilor acestor figuri feminine prin ceea ce se numeşte „post-memorie” (Hirsch 1997 & 2012) a generat  „reminiscenţe obsedante” („haunting legacies” (Schwab 2010), transmiţând reflexe inconştiente noii generaţii. Aceste experienţe traumatice, trăite sau moştenite, s-au manifestat cu forţă în scriitura de tip memorialistic sau auto/biografic a generației care a preluat amintirile traumatizante, precum și în scriitura confesivă a victimelor însele, anterior cenzurată de regimurile totalitare. Transmiterea memoriei reprimate s-a produs în contextul unui progres social inegal, care a creat disparităţi de gen şi a accentuat vulnerabilităţile feminine, în ciuda existenţei unor mişcări de emancipare care au primit sprijin oficial din partea unora dintre aceste regimuri.
Acest număr tematic are în vedere felul în care memoria traumatică (a experienţelor trăite, moştenite sau transmise) este transformată prin influenţa estetică a literaturii (uneori şi prin mijlocirea unor elemente vizuale, fotografie sau arte plastice), construind un spaţiu securizant în care revizitarea trecutului e un prilej de reflecţie şi învăţare. Volumul se concentrează pe o triadă care caracterizează scriitura auto/biografică: mărturia (urmând distincţiile făcute de Derrida şi Agamben şi nuanţate mai recent de van der Heiden, 2019, între testis, superstes, martyr, derivat la rândul său din grecescul martus –  şi auctor), rezistenţa (care concentrează suferinţa, durata, dar şi supravieţuirea) şi recuperarea (având conotaţii terapeutice în formă reflexivă, dar şi de salvare sau conservare în formă tranzitivă). Dorim să luăm în considerare influenţa cenzurii şi auto-cenzurii asupra procesului prin care această mărturie se transmite şi asupra modului în care „memoria absentă” (missing memory, Schwartz, Weller, & Winkel, 2021) e compensată de formele ficţionale ale scriiturii memorialistice (conţinute de termenul-umbrelă de life-writing). Contribuţiile autorilor interesaţi de acest număr pot acoperi un spectru larg de genuri şi subgenuri (biografii şi autobiografii, memorii, jurnale, scrisori, bioficţiune sau autoficţiune), incluzând texte publicate postum sau scrise retrospectiv.
Rememorarea traumelor  sau a vinovăţiei se manifestă în gesturi, imagini, naraţiune sau chiar în ceea ce rămâne nespus. Literatura auto/biografică (life-writing, unde includem şi materiale de arhivă, fotografice şi corespondenţă) a oferit un instrument major de acces, reansamblare şi conferire de sens acestor istorii în spaţiul Istoriei.  Numărul e interesat de descifrarea „reminiscenţelor comunicative ale traumei şi rezistenţei” (communicative legacies of trauma and resilience, Hannah Klieger, în Mitroiu 2018), relaţia dintre memorie şi istorie (Radstone & Hodgkin 2003), dar şi dintre mărturie şi literatură (Felman & Laub 1992, van der Heiden 2019). Impactul contextului local asupra formei (Mrozik & Tippner 2021) a modelat categoriile subsumate life-writing-ului, oferind un nou unghi pentru formularea teoriilor inovatoare asupra dezvoltării genului. Ne interesează articole care să pună accentul pe contextul local şi regional dar şi pe specificul mediului politic, social şi cultural care au influenţat literatura auto/biografică feminină.
Vă invităm să trimiteţi articole legate de următoarele teme şi nu numai:

  • Valoarea mărturiei, rezistenţei şi supravieţuirii înliteratura auto/biografică feminină, bioficţiune şi autoficţiune în relaţie cu traume istorice.
  • Rolul literaturii, dar şi al genurilor hibride (relatări auto/biografice incluzând fotografia şi artele vizuale), în recuperarea experienţelor feminine est şi sud-est europene în secolul XX, dar şi în practici de post-memorie în documentele contemporane.
  • Politică, mişcări de emancipare şi retrograde: origini în cadrul secolului al XIX-lea. Marxismul şi Războiul Rece.
  • Implicarea femeilor din estul şi sud-estul Europei în mişcările politice (de dreapta sau stânga, incluzând aderenţa la grupările extremiste) şi, unde a fost cazul, reprimarea şi trauma care au rezultat din acestea, aşa cum apar prezentate în diverse medii artistice.
  • Impactul celor Două Războaie Mondiale şi al Războiului Rece precum şi al represiunii şi cenzurii comuniste şi fasciste asupra evoluţiei genului auto/biografic şi chestiunii memoriei.
  • Corpul ca spaţiu de manifestare al traumei, recuperării şi mărturiei în scriitura auto/biografică, reflectând atrocităţile secolului XX.
  • Tranziţia de la martor afectat de evenimente (martus) la martor ca autor al relatării (auctor) în scriitura auto/biografică.
  • Stabilirea de conexiuni şi trasee transnaţionale ale memoriei în scriitura auto/biografică feminină est şi sud-est europeană.
  • Identităţi conflictuale ale descendenţilor şi apropiaţilor victimelor, dar şi ale celor care au perpetuat trauma istorică

Contribuţiile pot fi trimise pe adresele editorilor acestui număr tematic după cum urmează:

Termene-limită:

  • Rezumate (aprox. 300 de cuvinte): 10 februarie 2022.
  • Lucrări acceptate (8000-9000 cuvinte): 30 iunie 2022.

Bibliografie:
Felman, Shoshana, and Laub, Dori. Testimony: Crises of Witnessing in Literature, Psychoanalysis, and History. New York & London: Routledge, 1992.
Hirsch, Marianne. Family Frames: Photography, Narrative, and Postmemory. Cambridge, MA & London: Harvard University Press, 1997.
Hirsch, Marianne. The Generation of Postmemory: Writing and Visual Culture After the Holocaust. New York: Columbia University Press, 2012.
Mitroiu, Simona (ed.). Women’s Narratives and the Postmemory of Displacement in Central and Eastern Europe. Cham: Palgrave, 2018.
Mrozik, Agnieszka, and Tippner, Anja. “Remembering Late Socialism in Autobiographical Novels and Autofictions from Central and Eastern Europe: Introduction”. European Journal of Life Writing. Vol 10, 2021, pp. 1-14.
Pető, Andrea. The Women of the Arrow Cross Party: Invisible Hungarian Perpetrators in the Second World War. Cham: Palgrave, 2020.
Radstone, Susannah, and Hodgkin, Katharine. Regimes of Memory. London & New York: Routledge, 2003.
Rowbotham, Sheila. A Century of Women: The History of Women in Britain and the United States. London: Viking, 1997.
Schwab, Gabrielle. Haunting Legacies: Violent Histories and Transgenerational Trauma. New York: Columbia University Press, 2010.
Schwartz, Matthias, Weller, Nina, and Winkel, Heike. After Memory: World War II in Contemporary Eastern European Literatures. Berlin/ Boston: De Gruyter, 2021.
Van der Heiden, Gert-Jan. The Voice of Misery: A Continental Philosophy of Testimony. New York: SUNY Press, 2019.

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Date of Event, February 18, 2022

Colleagues,

I’ve begun a new webinar series focused on scholars discussing their new books. The next episode will occur this Friday, Feb. 18, at 1:00 Eastern time. My guest will be Gail Okawa, discussing her book, Remembering Our Grandfathers’ Exile: US Imprisonment of Hawai’i’s Japanese in World War II. 

I’d love for you to join us if you’re free. Registration information is below. Feel free to share this widely.

Thanks,

Lynn Domina
ldomina@nmu.edu

You are invited to a Zoom webinar.
When: Feb 18, 2022 01:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
Topic: Let’s Talk Books at NMU

Please register for the date and time that works best for you:
https://nmu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_bznT6dkhTp-HPDFngGdLSQ

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

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Telling (Jewish) Lives: BiographersReports / (Jüdische) Leben erzählen: Biographische Werkstattberichte
All lectures in German

German version see below

Digital lecture series, winter term 2021/2022
Tuesdays, 6:15pm – 7:45pm (CEST/CET), online

Prior registration requested: events-js@uni-potsdam.de
Organized by Prof. Dr. Grażyna Jurewicz
University of Potsdam, Institute of Jewish and Religious Studies
Selma Stern Center for Jewish Studies Berlin-Brandenburg

On the topic
For some time now, there has been talk of a “biographical turn” in the historically working humanities. In Jewish Studies, too, the relevance of biographical research practice is continuously increasing. Based on this finding, the interdisciplinary lecture series held in German (Jüdische) Leben erzählen: Biographische Werkstattberichte [Telling (Jewish) Lives: Biographers’ Reports] offers insights into the historiographical and literary aspects of working on Jewish life stories.
Jewish lives often embody subject positions whose biographical accessing and analysis pose considerable challenges to researchers. These are rooted in phenomena such as exile, diaspora, transculturality, multilingualism, and intersectionality, which seem to be inherent in Jewish history and which result in potentially discontinuous or fragmented worlds of experience. The consequence is an often markedly complex constellation of sources, which on the one hand complicate biographical investigations, but on the other hand can prove particularly revealing for the methodology of biography. In the context of retrospective reflection on the processes of their life history studies, the speakers describe such challenges and possible ways of dealing with them, using concrete examples. In doing so, they touch upon a number of general methodological questions and practical research problems of biographical writing, such as: the choice of protagonists of biographical narratives; the presence of biographers in their representations of other lives and their possible identification with their own “objects”; the handling of gaps in knowledge or the abundance of knowledge; literary aspects of biographical work as well as its ethical dimensions; the representability of the connections between the life to be biographed and the specific form of creativity that was practiced in this life. Along these and other case-specific aspects of life writing, the lecture series will discuss the conditions of the possibility of transforming traces of past lives as conveyed by various media into written narratives in order to gain methodological yields for biographical research practice within and outside Jewish Studies.

Program
10/26/2021 Grażyna Jurewicz (Potsdam/Berlin): Prologue
11/2/2021 Beatrix Borchard (Hamburg/Berlin): Storytelling or Marking Gaps? Reflecting on the Handling of Biographical Source Material
11/9/2021 Ernst Piper (Potsdam): Between Intersectionality and Internationalism. Approaching Rosa Luxemburg
11/16/2021 Reiner Stach (Berlin): Kafka’s Life. A Research
11/30/2021 Verena Dohrn (Hannover): Family Biography as Literary Procedure. The Saga of the Oil Entrepreneurs Kahan from Baku
12/07/2021 Dominique Bourel (Paris/Kassel): Moses Mendelssohn and Martin Buber: Biography without Autobiography?
12/14/2021 Stefanie Mahrer (Bern/Basel): Salman Schocken. Topographies of a Life
01/11/2022 Katharina Prager (Vienna): “I can only understand it Hasidically…” – Jewishness in the Lives of Berthold and Salka Viertel
01/18/2022 Claudia Willms (Frankfurt am Main): Historiography from below? Franz Oppenheimer and Biographical Research from a Cultural Anthropology Perspective
01/25/2022 Efrat Gal-Ed (Düsseldorf/Augsburg): Nobody’s language. Itzik Manger – a European Poet. On the Biographical Textual Process
02/01/2022 Jacques Picard (Basel/Zurich): The Clock That Is Still Ticking. On Subjects and Objects in Biographical Research
02/08/2022 Philipp Lenhard (Munich): The Pitfalls of the Archive: On the Biography of Friedrich Pollock
02/15/2022 Christina Pareigis (Hamburg): Shamanistic Voyages. Review of the Making of an Intellectual Biography of Susan Taubes
02/22/2022 Stephan Braese (Aachen): To Biographize Hildesheimer: Workshop – Expedition – Laboratory
03/01/2022 Alfred Gall (Mainz): “I don’t belong anywhere, because I am from somewhere else”: Constellations of Biography and Science Fiction in Stanisław Lem’s Work
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German Version

Digitale Ringvorlesung, Wintersemester 2021/2022
(Jüdische) Leben erzählen: Biographische Werkstattberichte
dienstags, 18:15–19:45 Uhr (MESZ/MEZ), online

Anmeldung: events-js@uni-potsdam.de
Veranstaltet von Prof. Dr. Grażyna Jurewicz
Universität Potsdam, Institut für Jüdische Studien und Religionswissenschaft
Selma Stern Zentrum für Jüdische Studien Berlin-Brandenburg

Zum Thema
Seit geraumer Zeit ist in den historisch arbeitenden Geisteswissenschaften von einem „biographical turn“ die Rede. Auch in den Jüdischen Studien nimmt die Relevanz der biographischen Forschungspraxis kontinuierlich zu. Von diesem Befund ausgehend bietet die interdisziplinäre Ringvorlesung „(Jüdische) Leben erzählen: Biographische Werkstattberichte“ Einblicke in die historiographischen und literarischen Aspekte der Arbeit an jüdischen Lebensgeschichten.
Jüdische Lebensläufe verkörpern häufig Subjektpositionen, deren biographische Erschließung Forscher:innen vor erhebliche Herausforderungen stellt. Diese gründen in Phänomenen wie Exil, Diaspora, Transkulturalität, Mehrsprachigkeit und Intersektionalität, die der jüdischen Geschichte scheinbar inhärent sind und aus denen potenziell diskontinuierliche bzw. fragmentierte Erfahrungswelten resultieren. Das Ergebnis sind oft ausgesprochen komplexe Quellenkonstellationen, die biographische Untersuchungen einerseits erschweren, sich aber andererseits für die Methodologie der Biographie als besonders aufschlussreich erweisen können. Im Rahmen retrospektiver Reflexion über die Entstehungsprozesse ihrer lebensgeschichtlichen Studien schildern die Referent:innen an konkreten Beispielen solche Herausforderungen und den möglichen Umgang mit ihnen. Dabei berühren sie eine Reihe allgemeiner methodologischer Fragen und forschungspraktischer Probleme biographischen Schreibens, etwa: die Wahl von Protagonist:innen biographischer Narrative; die Anwesenheit der Biograph:innen in ihren Darstellungen fremder Leben und ihre eventuelle Identifikation mit den eigenen „Objekten“; den Umgang mit Wissenslücken bzw. der Wissensfülle; literarische Aspekte biographischer Arbeit sowie deren ethische Dimensionen; die Darstellbarkeit der Zusammenhänge zwischen dem zu biographierenden Leben und der je spezifischen Form der Kreativität, die in diesem Leben wirksam wurde. Entlang dieser und weiterer fallspezifischer Aspekte lebensgeschichtlichen Schreibens werden in der Ringvorlesung die Bedingungen der Möglichkeit diskutiert, medial vermittelte Spuren vergangener Leben in schriftliche Erzählungen zu transformieren, um damit methodologische Erträge für die biographische Forschungspraxis inner- und außerhalb des Faches Jüdische Studien zu gewinnen.
Termine
26.10.2021 Grażyna Jurewicz (Potsdam/Berlin): Prolog
02.11.2021 Beatrix Borchard (Hamburg/Berlin): Storytelling oder Lücken markieren? Nachdenken über den Umgang mit biographischem Quellenmaterial
09.11.2021 Ernst Piper (Potsdam): Zwischen Intersektionalität und Internationalismus. Annäherung an Rosa Luxemburg
16.11.2021 Reiner Stach (Berlin): Kafkas Lebenswelt. Eine Recherche
30.11.2021 Verena Dohrn (Hannover): Familienbiographie als literarisches Verfahren. Die Saga der Ölunternehmer Kahan aus Baku
07.12.2021 Dominique Bourel (Paris/Kassel): Moses Mendelssohn und Martin Buber: Biographie ohne Autobiographie?
14.12.2021 Stefanie Mahrer (Bern/Basel): Salman Schocken. Topographien eines Lebens
11.01.2022 Katharina Prager (Wien): „Ich kann es nur chassidisch begreifen…“ – Jüdischsein in den Leben von Berthold und Salka Viertel
18.01.2022 Claudia Willms (Frankfurt am Main): Geschichtsschreibung von unten? Franz Oppenheimer und die kulturanthropologische Biographieforschung
25.01.2022 Efrat Gal-Ed (Düsseldorf/Augsburg): Niemandssprache. Itzik Manger – ein europäischer Dichter. Zum biographischen Textverfahren
01.02.2022 Jacques Picard (Basel/Zürich): Die Uhr, die noch tickt. Von Subjekten und Objekten in der Biographieforschung
08.02.2022 Philipp Lenhard (München): Die Tücken des Archivs: Zur Biographie Friedrich Pollocks
15.02.2022 Christina Pareigis (Hamburg): Shamanistic Voyages. Rückblick auf die Entstehung einer intellektuellen Biographie über Susan Taubes
22.02.2022 Stephan Braese (Aachen): Hildesheimer „biographieren“: Werkstatt – Expedition – Labor
01.03.2022 Alfred Gall (Mainz): „Ich gehöre nirgendwo hin, denn ich bin anderswoher“: Konstellationen von Biographie und Science-Fiction bei Stanisław Lem


Prof. Dr. Grażyna Jurewicz
Universität Potsdam
Institut für Jüdische Studien und Religionswissenschaft
Am Neuen Palais 10 | 14469 Potsdam | Raum 1.11.0.04
Telefon: +49 (0) 331 977-1284
E-Mail: grazyna.zuzanna.jurewicz@uni-potsdam.de

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Call for Papers: Autotheory: Thinking through Self, Body, Practice (Hybrid Conference)

Deadline for Submissions: 1st February 2022

Date: Week of 24th October 2022

Venue: University of Glasgow and online

In 2015, the term ‘autotheory’ rose to prominence with the publication of Maggie Nelson’s The Argonauts, eliciting a flurry of critical and academic attention. Yet the practice of blending self-representation with philosophical and theoretical engagements has a long history and rhizomatic roots. Notably, the practice has been mobilised and advanced through the work of Women of Colour and LGBTQ+ feminist writers and thinkers, for example Audre Lord, bell hooks, Cherríe Moraga, Christina Sharpe, Gloria Anzaldúa, and Theresa Hak Kyung Cha. Comparable practices have arisen across time and place, across traditions of memoir and autobiographic writing, personal essay, creative nonfiction, criticism, autoethnography, activism, philosophy and critical theory, as well as in performance, visual art and film. While the practice has been most closely associated with literature, we are interested in exploring its possibilities beyond. Artists like Adrian Piper and Félix González-Torres push the boundaries of the term beyond the literary sphere and we especially encourage submissions that do the same.

We use ‘autotheory’ not to limit the possibilities of engagement, but rather to pay homage to the thinkers who have thought alongside it over the years; thinkers like Gloria Anzaldúa, who’s  ‘autohistoria’ and ‘autohistoria-teoría’ are foundational blocks for autotheory as it is understood today. Anzaldua used ‘autohistoria’ to describe art that ‘depicts both the soul of the artist and the soul of the pueblo… [which] goes beyond the traditional self-portrait or autobiography; in telling the writer/artist’s personal story, it also includes the artist’s cultural history.’ In 2009, she coined ‘autohistoria-teoría’ to describe a ‘personal essay that theorizes’.

The cognate ‘autotheory’ was coined by Stacey Young in 1997 to describe feminist ‘autotheoretical texts’ such as This Bridge Called My Back (ed. Gloria Anzaldúa and Cherríe Moraga) as ‘counter-discourses’ and ‘the embodiment of a discursive type of political action, which de-centers the hegemonic subject of feminism’. Later, Mieke Bal described the practice as a ‘ongoing, spiralling form of analysis-theory dialectic’ and more recently still, Lauren Fournier has referred to autotheory as a means of using autobiography, first person and other self-imaging processes to perform, enact, iterate, subvert and instantiate the hegemonic discourse of theory and philosophy.

The term, then, is nebulous and porous, open to multiple iterations and possibilities. We want to explore them.

Autotheory: Thinking through Self, Body, Practice will be held over two days at the University of Glasgow and online and will explore autotheory across practices, mediums, disciplines, places and times. We seek contributions from activists, artists, critics, curators, filmmakers, musicians, performers, scholars, writers, and anyone whose work engages with autotheory or with the self and theory/philosophy, working in any medium. We are interested in papers, performances, workshops,  and cross-modal events which explore the history and/or future of autotheory; autotheory as decolonial and feminist practice; the assumptions and implications underlying the mode; practices of autotheory; autotheoretical works and works which might be autotheory; and anything else that touches on the personal as theoretical. Autotheoretical approaches are encouraged. Please also send us your autotheoretical poems, songs, artworks, fragments and uncategorizable miscellanea–we hope to provide space for autotheoretical works themselves.

If you have any queries, please email us at: autotheoryconference@gmail.com

To submit, please complete this google form: https://forms.gle/a4qN1evzivVRxiUNA

Submissions should include an approximately 300 word proposal and a little bit about yourself. Please also consider if you would like to contribute in person or online and let us know any specific requirements your submission might entail.

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Call for Papers: Biographies of Numbers

July 7, 2022 to July 9, 2022, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany

Deadline for Submissions: January 31, 2022

Throughout the twentieth century, Chinese intellectuals, politicians, and scientists were obsessed with the population number of their country. From the late nineteenth century to the foundation of the People’s Republic (PRC) in 1949, without being able to rely on entirely accurate census surveys, they alleged that China had 400 million inhabitants (Bréard 2019). Consequently, the narrative goes, this made the world’s most populous country hard to govern, but also one of the most important countries in the world which eventually deserved a leading role in international politics. Governing and controlling the population arguably has been and is one of the most fundamental concerns of the government of the PRC, spawning numerous social engineering projects such as the one-child policy or the social credit system.

Biographies of Numbers will explore the life of numerically framed knowledge, such as the population of China, from a global historical perspective on quantification, regarded as one of the most pervasive practices of the modern world. This conference is based on the assumption that numbers have their own biographies: they come into being, lead a life of their own, travel in time and space, have a career, and eventually fall into oblivion. That numbers are not simply the objective reflection of reality but socially, politically, culturally, and historically constructed knowledge has been shown extensively for the case of statistics in the Western world (Desrosières 1993, Porter 2020). At the same time, numbers are powerful agents which represent, transform, and recreate individual lives, social worlds, political spheres, nature, or other entities that are taken for granted. Statistical and other numbers, invoking mathematical reason and scientific truth, often claim universal validity and thus circulate easily from one site to another. By following the global trajectory of a single number from its production and global dissemination to the divergent narratives surrounding its numerical value, we can analyze the stabilizing and destabilizing impact of numbers on individual and collective practices and imaginaries. The aim of the conference is to trace the biographies of specific numbers. Although we will limit ourselves to “scientific numbers”, i.e. those that are grounded on quantitative knowledge and method, our notion of “number” is to be understood more broadly, including indicators, formulas, and statistics as well.

By focusing on the historical emergence and circulation of numbers and on patterns of argumentation and narration with these numbers, this conference also aims to contribute to historical epistemology and the global history of science. Rather than pursuing a realist approach that focuses on the alleged scientific “discovery” of numbers or claiming that they are mere “inventions” in the constructivist sense, we see to follow the argument that numbers as (scientific) objects can be “simultaneously real and historical” (Daston 2000:3).

Possible questions to be addressed might include: How do certain numbers or indicators become objects of scientific inquiry or scientific entities themselves? What debates are they surrounded by, how and when do they become entrenched in scientific practices, and how do they disappear from the consciousness of the public or scientific experts? What powers and agency do we attribute to numbers? What are the sources of their power? How do numbers interact with other forms of authority, for example law, to create trust? How have instruments of quantification altered the modalities of governing and forms of personhood and subjectivity? Who writes the biography of a number?

Although some of these questions have been examined partially in a Western European or North American context, they have been largely ignored regarding other regions. We welcome contributions that deal with the historical and cultural role of numbers, particularly in China but also more generally in other East Asian countries. While papers may be situated in a local context, they are welcome to chart developments that occurred in many areas and over longer time periods.

Contributions might address the following topics:

  • biomedical numbers and indicators as ideals or thresholds (such as the 7-day incidence in the context of COVID)
  • the cross-cultural dissemination and adaptation of an indicator
  • governing individuals and populations by body measurements and biometrical data
  • the political life of social numbers and their effect on categories such as family, gender balance, etc. (e.g. China’s “One-Child”)
  • the role of ideology in the construction and application of quantitative knowledge
  • numbers as authoritative entity justifying policies
  • numbers as cultural, social or political icons
  • delegation processes that contribute to the fame and persistence of a numerical entity
  • the dichotomy between the absolute (universal, eternal) value of a number and its narratives or degrees of realism (variable, manipulable, etc.).

Practicalities and timeframe:

The Conference is organized with the generous support of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation within the framework of the sin-aps project at the Chair for Sinology with a focus on the Intellectual and Cultural History of China, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg. It will take place July 7-9, 2022, in the city of Erlangen. Please send an abstract of no longer than one page and a short, one-paragraph biographical statement to Prof. Andrea Bréard andrea.breard@fau.de and Dr. Nicolas Schillinger nicolas.schillinger@fau.de by January 31, 2022.

Selected participants are expected to send in an unpublished paper draft by the end of May 2022, since we will have discussion and reading groups based on participants’ submissions and envision a publication after the conference.

References

Bréard, Andrea. “400 Millionen – Globale Wirkungen einer mächtigen Zahl.” in N. Bilo, S. Haas and M. C. Schneider, eds., Kulturgeschichte der Statistik, Steiner Verlag (2019), 215–232.

Daston, Lorraine, ed. Biographies of Scientific Objects. University of Chicago Press, 2000.

Desrosières, Alain. La politique des grands nombres : une histoire de la raison statistique. Paris: La Découverte, 1993.

Porter, Ted. Trust in Numbers: The Pursuit of Objectivity in Science and Public Life. Princeton University Press, 2020 (2nd ed.).

Contact Info:

Alexander-von-Humboldt Research Group Sin-Aps

Hartmannstr. 14, D3

91052 Erlangen, Germany

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Deadline for Submissions January 31, 2022

CFP: Remembering Contentious Lives
May 11-13th 2022 at Utrecht University
Organised as part of the ERC research project
Remembering Activism: The Cultural Memory of Protest in Europe (PI
Ann Rigney)
Contact: Clara Vlessing, Duygu Erbil, react@uu.nl.

What can studying life stories tell us about the relationship between memory and activism? Auto/biography studies has long been interested in the ways in which written lives construct subjectivities. Life writing itself has under certain conditions been theorised as a dissenting practice (Perkins 2000; Powell 2021): functioning as testimony in human rights activism (Schaffer and Smith 2004; Whitlock 2007), exemplifying textual forms with which to voice resistance (Harlow 1987; Harlow 1996) or constructing a repertoire of activist identities. Building on these discussions of the socio-political potential of representing lived experience, this conference looks specifically at the storying of contentious lives. How do we remember lived experiences of dissent? And how does life writing, as an act of cultural remembrance, play into the construction of collective identities? Can remembering past activist lives affect contemporary activism?

Bringing together social movement, cultural memory and auto/biography studies, this conference will consider the role of life stories in the memory-activism nexus (Rigney 2018). Auto/biography has a part to play in memory activism (Gutman 2017), in the mobilisation of memory in activism and in mediating the memory of activism: storying contemporary or recent lives saves a particular set of images or version of events for posterity; while the storying of past lives affects the changing memory of protest and protestors, and has the potential to mobilise activists in the present. Focusing on memories of change and the desire to change, it aims to bridge the gap between accounts of remembering selves and remembering collectives in social movements.

Possible lines of enquiry include:

●  What can life writing help us understand about the role of cultural memory in social
movements?
●  How can an individual’s storied life stand for a collective? What are the available subject
positions or models for contentious subjectivities?
●  What are the media and genres for remembering contentious lives? What literary devices are
at work and how do they structure political emotions and affect?
●  Which institutions prompt or affect the stories of contentious lives? How does this change
over time?
●  What forms of witnessing are important to the memory of social movements? Is there an
inherent relationship between witnessing and injustice?
●  How does the memory of movements relate to the memory of individual lives, which go on
longer than particular protest cycles? What role does intergenerational storytelling have in the transmission of contentious memories?

If you are interested in participating, please send a 350-word abstract and short bio to react@uu.nl before January 31st 2022. This is an in-person conference with the possibility of online presentation. A limited number of travel grants will be made available. We intend for this conference to lead to an edited publication in a peer-reviewed venue. Participants will be invited to contribute.

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CALL FOR PAPERS

Poetics of Travelling Self: Discursive Formations and Purposiveness of Travel

Special Issue of Language, Literature, and Interdisciplinary Studies

The heterogenous character of protean form of travel writing—letters, journals, logbooks, diaries, memoir, journalistic pieces, guidebooks, confessional narratives, accounts of seafaring voyages, literary picaresque narratives, scientific explorations, artists’ escapades, ventures of urban flâneurs, self-exiled wanderers, and fictionresists easy demarcation. Its heterogeneity lies in the revisionary stance brought about in each narrative through the distinguishing figure of the traveller, mode of narration, means of mapping, or redefining of the landscape. Right from antiquity to medieval, modern to postmodern times, travel narratives have showcased relevance despite premature announcements or off-the-mark assessments of their ‘death.’ Witnessing a renaissance in the late twentieth century, travel writings continue to be written in ever increasing numbers in the twenty-first century and engage critical attention across disciplines.

Travel writing fosters self-fashioning through the curation of a persona with experiential outlook who presents the world to her readers. This mode of subjective perception and a detached analytical voice threading along in the narrative melds facts with the imaginary to create literary composition with varied manifestations. A genre that quintessentially encounters the other also gives rise to the discursive formations of the other perceived through the gaze of traveler. The embeddedness of gaze, individual and/or collective, in a certain cultural ideology not only helps in evaluating one’s own context but also works to construct epistemological narratives of what is perceived as foreign, resulting in the intertwining of micro with macro history. Crosscurrents of representing actual or fictional travel narratives, while creating space for cross-cultural fertilization, often involve involuntary expeditions into the unknown. Slave narratives, refugee narratives, exile narratives among others reveal a complex motif of travel caused by forces external to the subject. In these accounts of journey beyond, home is the seminal anchor that provides a threshold for theoretical underpinnings relevant to diaspora, migration, and displacement.

The poetics of the travelling self is a subject of curiosity since the beginning of Homo sapiens’ story right from the time when they dispersed out of Africa. The motifs of journey, be it inner or outer, along with their motivation and purpose have certainly been diverse: exploratory, survival, religious, commercial, exploitative, scientific, or professional. Documented through time and space, these motifs corroborate the descriptive with the affective to profoundly shape the history of the world as we know it. If, at one level, they raise extensive questions related to privileged mobility, dynamics of geopolitical boundaries, and economic structures then at another level, they probe explicit issues of neo-imperialism, along with the perpetuation, reinforcement, and reproduction of prevailing ideologies of Empire. The inviting simplicity and intrinsic complexity of travel literature allows for scrutiny on multiple scales—insightfully teasing out political and historical hegemonies enmeshed with racial, class, gender, and power dynamics. In recent years, disability studies too have made major inroads into this genre. Moreover, in conjunction with new digital media, characterized as mobility turn in Arts as well as Humanities and more generally in Social Sciences, enquiry into travel literature takes precedence and acts as a crucial optic to make sense of new configurations of power, subjectivity, relationality, and the globalized world alike. Critical engagement with travel writing yields a fruitful site for the analysis of social, historical, economic, political, and cultural issues underpinning contemporary state of affairs. In the context of Covid-19 pandemic here, ‘vaccine passport’ emerges as an interesting phenomenon to study vis-à-vis travel writing. Critical engagement with travel writing yields a fruitful site to study issues in the contemporary scenario by way of interdisciplinary analysis involving philosophy, sociology, history, anthropology, literary studies, economics, political science, rhetoric, media and cultural studies, and linguistics among others.

Scholars are invited to explore how travel writings make and remake us and our world through and beyond following themes:

  • Travel writing as Life Writing
  • Wanderlust and economy of desire
  • Dynamics of exclusion
  • Democratization of travel and mass tourism
  • Travel writing as means of worldmaking
  • Travel writing and thanatourism
  • Memory Studies and travel writing
  • Tradition of travel writing in non-western world
  • Food and travel
  • Pedagogical approaches to travel writing
  • Motif of travel in Bildungsroman genre
  • Travel as a theme in Science Fiction and popular fiction
  • Formation/crisis of identity
  • Autobiographical travel narratives: phenomenology of experience
  • Travel writing in Cultural Studies
  • Travel writing and Medical Humanities
  • Theories of affect in relation to travel writing
  • Travel blogs, vlogs, and visual culture
  • Philosophical travelogues
  • Significance of religion in travel writing
  • Travel journalism
  • Travel writing and imagined geography/cartography
  • Ecocritical approaches to travel writing
  • Travel writing and cosmopolitanism

Submissions:

Only complete papers will be considered for publication. The papers need to be submitted according to the guidelines of the MLA 8th edition. You are welcome to submit full length papers (3,500–10,000 words) along with a 150 words abstract and list of keywords. Please read the submission guidelines before making the submission – http://ellids.com/author-guidelines/
submission-guidelines/
. Please feel free to email any queries to – editors@ellids.com.

Please make all submissions via the form: https://forms.gle/c4tN4M1JdJCKXLgr7

Submission deadline: 31st January, 2022

Website – http://ellids.com/

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/journal.llids/

Contact Email:
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CALL FOR PAPERS
3rd EUI CONFERENCE IN VISUAL AND MATERIAL CULTURE STUDIES

Souvenirs, keepsakes and tokens:
material and visual expressions of personal memories (12th-21st centuries)

16th May 2022
European University Institute, Florence

Submissions Due–31st January 2022

Organizing committee: Elisa Chazal, Isabelle Riepe, Ana Struillou

People use objects as a memento for fragments of their lives, be they ordinary memories of childhood, or extraordinary memories of travel, wonder, belief, rupture or oppression. From the inception of pilgrimage, travellers collected and carried tokens of the places they transited through that were later displayed back home. Similarly, souvenirs are also meaningful objects in sedentary lives,materialisingdomestic and intimate momentsand tensions within the home. Yet, souvenirs were not crafted, distributed, sold and acquired solely by European men and women. Instead,from medieval pilgrimages to present-day immigration, sedentary and mobile individuals are engaged in a form of emotional attachment to objects, as reminders of their past. We define souvenirs as mementoes of places and times, tied to individuals and communities who ascribed to them changing meanings and functions throughout their existence. These ever-evolving objects acquired new values and symbolic status. Taking this broad definition of souvenirs, this conference seeks to ascertain how individuals, families and communities memorialise their past through the visual and material world.

We welcome proposals discussing the trajectory of souvenirs from their creation, distribution and their eventual musealisation or destruction, from the twelfth to the twenty-first century. Papers are expected to use visual and material evidence. We aim for this conference to reach beyond the boundaries of historical scholarship and therefore warmly welcome papers from other fields including art history, historical anthropology, and archaeology.

The researcher-led Visual and Material History Working Group of the European University Institute in Florence invites you to a one-day conference on the material and visual expressions of individual memories. By encouraging exchanges between different disciplines and scholars researching on the medieval, early modern and modern periods, we hope that this event will foster new questions and perspectives on the fields of historical anthropology, history and art history.

Proposals may include, but are not limited to:

  • Religion and pilgrimage
  • Ruptures: armed conflicts, revolution, end of regime, wars
  • Forms of oppression, slavery, prosecution and forceful confinement
  • Gender and sexualities
  • Health and pandemics
  • Family and life trajectories
  • Diasporas and migrations
  • Grand tour and modern tourism (e.g., mass-produced souvenirs)
  • Collecting practices, displays and performances
  • Categorization and administration of objects

To submit a paper, send an abstract (no more than 300 words) and a short biography to visual.materialeui@gmail.com by 31st January 2022. Early-career researchers are particularly encouraged to submit.

We hope this event to take place on site, or at least in a hybrid format. Partial covering of travelling and accommodation expenses is possible for the speakers willing to travel to Florence. Please indicate in your submission if you would be willing to come to Florence, should the situation allow it, or would prefer to attend via ZOOM.

Contact Email:
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Re: REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS – Freelance Story Writer for Hispanic Access

Introduction

Hispanic Access Foundation is a national 501(c)(3) organization that connects Latinos with partners and opportunities to improve lives and create an equitable society. Our vision is that all Hispanics throughout the U.S. enjoy good physical health, a healthy natural environment, a quality education, economic success and civic engagement in their communities with the sum of improving the future of America.

In the spirit of our mission and vision, Hispanic Access wants to highlight 52 stories from our various networks. We work nationwide with faith leaders, conservation focused individuals, Black, Indigenous, Latinos, and other people of color, and other community leaders. With these stories, we want to
amplify the voices of those that we work with through our social media and website.

The Stories

Hispanic Access Foundation will provide its freelance writer with the story ideas, corresponding network members and their contact information. The writer will then take this information to conduct interviews in order to produce a total of 52 (400 – 700 word) stories. The breakdown of stories/networks
provided will be similar to this:

o Conservation (11 total Stories)

▪ Por La Creación Faith-Based Alliance
▪ Latino Conservation Week
▪ Our Heritage, Our Planet Film Week

o Hispanic Leadership Network (11 total Stories)

▪ HLN Retreat 2022

▪ HLN Cohort Members

o MANO Project (11 total Stories)

▪ US Fish and Wildlife Service
▪ National Park Service
▪ US Forest Service
▪ MANO Alumni

o Organization (11 total Stories)

▪ Latino Advocacy Week
▪ Board Members
▪ Staff

o Our Dreams Scholarship (4 total Stories)

o COVID Vaccine Initiative (4 total Stories)

What We Expect

Here are our guidelines for these stories:
● 400-700 words
● 3-5 high quality photos from the individual to attach to the story.
(We will provide guidance on what is needed for the feature photo and the quality of other images. Writer will not need to take the images, simply instruct the contact on what’s needed and coordinate their reception.)
● Written in the third-person perspective
● Bilingual (English and Spanish) — it is likely that some of our members prefer to be interviewed in Spanish.

Budget

We will pay $100 for each story written, budgeted up to $5,200 for 52 stories.
● Funds can be distributed after every 5-10 stories submitted or as a lump sum at the end of thecontract, depending on writer preference.

Timeline

Our preferred timeline is outlined below, however, it is open to modifications based on schedule and availability. Additionally, we would look to have a monthly 1 hour check-in beginning on February 1st.

● January 21 – Proposals Due
● January 25 – Contract Awarded
● February 11 – First 3-5 Stories Due
● March 11 –8 Stories Due
● June 1 – 8 Stories Due
● August 1 – 8 Stories Due
● October 1 – 8-10 Stories Due
● December 1 – Final 8 Stories Due

Submission Requirements

We’re not looking for a lengthy proposal.Your proposal should include the following items, which will inform the selection process:

● Writing Samples: provide PDFs or links to 3 examples that demonstrate your writing abilities when it comes to writing features/profiles..
● Budget: provide a budget proposal that includes your fees, as well as any additional costs that should be considered.
● Timeline: We outlined the tentative timeline above, please outline the timeline from your perspective.
● Spanish Language Proficiency: Please highlight your Spanish language capacity (native/bilingual, conversational, professional).

Point-of-Contact

For questions about the scope of work, please contact:
● Evelyn Ramirez, Digital Communications Associate, evelyn@hispanicaccess.org

Deadline for Submission

Proposals should be received no later than Monday, January 21, 2021. Submissions should beemailed to Evelyn Ramirez at evelyn@hispanicaccess.org.

Proposal Reviews/Calls/Selection
Proposals will be reviewed by staff. Calls may be scheduled by Hispanic Access Foundation if necessary.

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CfP: Modern Travel, Modern Landscapes: Connections and Exchanges in Europe c. 1850-1950

(1/28/2022; 7/6-7/2022)

This conference is intended as the first in a series of events to discuss travel writing in modern history and literature. It is organised by Jana Hunter (University of Oxford) and Christian Drury (Durham University) – please see a call for papers below.

Christian Drury
Department of History
Durham University
christian.j.drury@durham.ac.uk

Modern Travel, Modern Landscapes

Connections and Exchanges in Europe c. 1850-1950

6th and 7th July 2022

University of Durham

Travel was central to shaping identity in Europe between the mid-nineteenth and mid-twentieth century. Representations of place, as well as personal, cultural and institutional connections, informed and structured travel at this time. Travellers within Europe and from outside shaped an understanding of what Europe was and is in a global, imperial context. As Kate Hill has put it, “under the influence of technological and colonial change, spaces, narratives themselves, and cultural encounters all took on a greater measure of flux as the nineteenth century progressed. The provisional nature of the modern categories of home and away were forged in the nineteenth century”.

This conference calls for papers on travel in this period, especially travel writing which considers landscape and modernity as key themes. Considering travel narratives, both published and private, as well as other texts, images and sources, allows us to consider these historical connections in greater detail, while taking travel as a practice, together with the structuring themes of landscape and modernity, will enrich our understanding of European history in the period.

Modern Travel, Modern Landscapes looks to engage with a rich diversity of subjects including but not limited to: history and history of science, geography and natural sciences, art history and visual culture (photography and film), as well as architecture and urban studies. We are particularly interested in understanding how travel and landscape can be perceived and experienced  by an individual. As such, we encourage submissions which explore not only physical travel, but also ‘armchair travel’ through the consumption of the representations of place. We will consider broadly four main themes:

Identities

Identities are formed by travel and travel is influenced by identities. In modern Europe, the identity of the traveller, as well as those they travel with, are crucial for thinking about who can travel and where. We welcome submissions that consider these identities of travel, as well as the forms their depictions of travel take and how connections are – or are not – made.

  • How does a traveller identify with a place and with travelling?
  • Who can travel and where? Who can choose their travel?
  • Who claims authority to speak about the place travelled to and through?
  • How is Europe represented by travellers from the rest of the world?
  • How does the travellee respond? How can hidden or marginalised actors be included?

Infrastructure

Travellers need ways of getting to places and their forms of travel affect their representations of place. However, infrastructure is more than transport and we encourage submissions which take a broad approach to discussing the way in which travel was structured and communicated.

  • How do different types of travel affect travel narratives?
  • Who is a tourist and does it matter? How can we diversify the idea of infrastructure?
  • How are travellers influenced by existing discourses?
  • What is the relationship between infrastructure and landscape?

Time and temporalities

Time may not be at the heart of travel writing, but it does present itself in a number of different ways. There are a number of ways to read time and temporality in travel writing, encapsulating notions of history, encountered in the environment, or even in terms of progression. We welcome submissions that explore how travellers experienced, perceived, and considered temporalities and in turn, informed their audiences back at home.

  • How has time been represented, coded and understood by travellers?
  • How do travellers and/or travellees apply meaning to time and temporality?
  • To what extent can we consider temporality to be a dimension of travel experience?
  • How did encroaching modernity shape ideas of time?
  • How was time experienced in different spaces and environments?

Borders and frontiers

A number of different borders and frontiers were crossed by travellers, which not only played into the travellers’ cultural identity and perception of the self, but also fed into the wider understanding of the society and cultures they were encountering. We welcome discussions that explore physical boundaries and frontiers, for example geopolitical and military, but also encourage submissions discussing racial, gender, and sexual frontiers or that focus on how economic, linguistic, national and aesthetic borders were negotiated.

  • What different frontiers exist?
  • How did frontiers influence identities?
  • When, where, and how were frontiers challenged, faced, and crossed?
  • Did they create new tensions or categories?
  • Are frontiers in opposition to one another?

Please send an abstract of up to 300 words and a short biography of no more than 100 words to Jana Hunter and Christian Drury (mtml2022@gmail.com) by Friday 28th January 2022.

Contact Info:

Christian Drury and Jana Hunter

Durham University/University of Oxford

Contact Email:

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Call for Proposals: The Routledge Companion to Latinx Life Writing

Abstracts Due–January 28, 2022

Contributions are invited for consideration to be published in a collection of essays introducing readers to Latinx Life Writing, a prominent and essential pan-genre within Latinx literature since Latinx literature began to be conceived as such. Life writing is a broad umbrella term that encompasses a number of genres in which authors take life and lived experience as their core subject. Within Latinx life writing, these genres include memoir, autobiography, and testimonio most centrally. The proposed handbook provides a broad overview of the Latinx life writing in terms of its history, key themes and questions, and genres. The handbook will feature chapters on the trends and concerns of Latinx life writers across different historical periods, providing insight into various thematic and generic concerns as they evolve throughout Latinx cultural production.  Although this book is scholarly in nature, the tone will be broadly accessible in order to make the book suitable for a wide audience including graduate students, undergraduate students in community colleges and four-year universities, and classroom instructors.

THE ROUTLEDGE COMPANION TO LATINX LIFE WRITING is under contract and scheduled to be published in 2024.

We are seeking proposals specifically in the following areas:

  • 19th century and U.S. occupation narratives (oral histories-narratives, correspondence, memories, diaries)
  • Crónica, relatos, testimonios
  • Fictionalized autobiographies/life writing in fiction/plays
  • Corridos, folklore, oral forms
  • Correspondence (in wartime or Latino veterans or because of family separation, etc.)
  • Poetry of protest
  • Coming of age autobiographical narratives
  • Experimental autobiographical works
  • Education testimonios
  • Chicana and Latina “Third World” women of color feminist mixed genre writing
  • Autobiographical narratives of exile
  • LGBTQ+/Queer articulations
  • Testimonios and new media (Digital Humanities, digital storytelling)
  • Grief, trauma narratives
  • Graphic narratives
  • Undocumented narratives

We are seeking only original, never before published work at this time. Please submit a no more than two page abstract (approximately 500 words) of a chapter that you wish to be considered for this handbook by as well as a 2 page abbreviated curriculum vitae. Please send any questions and your abstract for the chapter you wish to be considered to the volume editors,  Dr. Christine Fernandez (chrfernandez@csumb.edu) and Dr. Maria Joaquina Villaseñor (mvillasenor@csumb.edu).

Contact Info:

Professor Maria Villaseñor, California State University, Monterey Bay; Professor Christine Fernandez, California State University, Monterey Bay

Contact Email:

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The 2022 AFEA Annual Conference : “Legitimacy, Authority, Canons

31 May- 3 June 2022, Bordeaux Montaigne University (France)

deadline for submissions: 
January 17, 2022

POPULAR CULTURE WORKSHOP

Historical destinies as the foundation of legitimacy: the biographical genre in the United States pop cultures

Between 2000 and 2021, out of the twenty-one winners of the Oscar for Best Actor, eleven were rewarded for playing the part of a historical figure. Seven of the movies they appeared in were clearly identified as biographical pictures. Over the same period, thirty-three out of the one hundred and fifty Oscar for Best Picture nominees – and four of the movies that were awarded the prized statuette – were biopics. Since 2017, the Netflix biographical series The Crown has been nominated four times for both the Golden Globe and the Emmy Award for Outstanding Drama Series, and it has brought home four of these awards.

The biographical genre has place of pride in Hollywood and in US popular culture in general, understandably so: it brings together the pseudo-legitimacy of the period film and the widespread appetite for tales of remarkable destinies. Biographies can be found in films and series of course, and in traditional or graphic novels (too many to name), but also in music (Bob Dylan’s songs “Hurricane” and “Joey”, or Elton John’s “Candle in the Wind” for example), stage musicals (such as Evita, Beautiful: The Carole King Musical, or more recently, Hamilton), and even video games (Ryan Green’s That Dragon, Cancer, and Nina Freeman’s games Cibele, How Do You Do It and We Met in May, explore universal themes even though they are based on the lives of their programmers).

Rewriting and romanticizing are cornerstones of the genre. They are a way for biographical fictions to turn historical facts into narratives that will be both accessible to the general public and bankable. It has the same popularizing tone as historical fiction, but because it focuses on a single character, it fosters the process of identification, and makes it possible for the audience to get emotionally involved in the story that it unfolds. This raises the question: who is pictured and, to some extent, mythologized, in biographical fiction? The major – or sometimes a bit obscure – historical figures that the genre sheds light on come from a variety of backgrounds (politicians, artists, scientists…), and are transformed into heroic figures through the narrative. Biographical fiction explores and (re)shapes past events in order to explain how and why these people became so well-known and/or important. And in doing so, they sometimes explore the dark side of American society, telling tales of serial killers for example (Jeffrey Dahmer, Ted Bundy, Aileen Wuornos…), or of other famous criminals – through increasingly popular (and numerous) “true crime” novels, television shows and podcasts, a genre that finds its more celebrated examples in Netflix series such as Narcos or Mindhunter. How can we make sense of a genre that thrives in the representation of both somber individuals who threaten the very fabric of society, and role-models who often feed into the myth of the American self-made-(wo)man? Conversely, why are there so few biopics that revolve around big scientific figures, and why are so many of these people represented as mad or lonely scientists?

The issue of the lack of representation also comes to mind: are there any categories of people whose biographies are not fictionalized, or have only become an object of fiction recently? Are women, for instance, represented as often and in the same way as men (an issue tackled by Raphaëlle Moine in Vies héroïques : biopics masculins, biopics féminins)? What about other minorities? In the past few years, there has been a surge of representations of black women in Hollywood biopics with movies such as Hidden Figures, Nina or Harriet, which focus specifically on women who fought, in some way, against racist discriminations. Although they offer better representation to a part of the American society that is rarely pictured in leading roles, it would seem justified to wonder whether these movies are merely a way for Hollywood to push aside the criticisms of the #OscarsSoWhite movement, while limiting this representation to safe, widely recognized figures. This question could be broadened to the representation of African-American figures, indeed most of the biographical fictions about them focus on figures of athletes or musicians whom the general public already knows and loves. The limited representation of other minorities, such as Asian-Americans or LGBTQI+ people, could be similarly questioned.

Finally, the strong link between literature and the moving picture is made particularly clear in biographical fiction: biographical narratives are often adapted from the page onto the screen, or focus on major literary figures, usually trying to shed light on the way in which their personal lives inspired their most famous works (an idea that Hilda Shachar worked on in Screening the Author: The Literary Biopic). Most such adaptations are biographical novels turned into biopics, but the source can also be a graphic novel or a comic (American Splendor, My Friend Dahmer). The literary roots of the genre could be a way for it to claim its own legitimacy, to base itself on foundations that seem solid and more worthy of respect than other media, and which could grant an appearance of “seriousness” to the narrative. But in that case, what is the canon that biographical fiction follows? How does the genre set aside historical truth in order to conform to the codes of the different media it appears in? Are some aspects of history systematically erased when the biographical narrative is being constructed, and why? Is the modification of facts as big a deal as Time Out film critic Dave Calhoun seemed to believe when he wrote that Bohemian Rhapsody was “an act of brazen myth-making. Facts and chronology are tossed aside in favor of a messianic storyline…”, thus highlighting the complex relationship between biographical fiction and its own codes?

Papers can deal with, but are not limited to:

– The forms of biographical fictions, and the ways in which it adapts to the codes of various media.

– The idea of authoritative figures: are the heroes of biographical fiction already leading figures in their field, or does the genre create new objects of fame by enabling the audience to identify to them through popular fiction?

– The relationship between biographical fiction and historical facts, as a potential way for popular culture to claim its own legitimacy. The issue of time and the chronological reorganization, or even rewriting, of facts in order to turn biographies into myths.

– Conversely, the question of the evolution of biographical fiction through time, and the changes in its form, but also in the figures it chooses to focus on. Are there any “forgotten” biopics, which focus on figures now considered to be dangerous for the American society?

– The connection between the biography of an artist and artistic creation itself, a topic that seems particularly relevant in the case of jukebox musicals such as Beautiful: A Carol King Musical or Rocketman.

– The compatibility between biographical fiction and video games: why are there so few biographical video games, and why are so many of them autobiographies? To what extent can the gameplay allow players to be fully involved in a narrative that entirely belongs to someone else?

– More generally, the integration of biographical fiction into other forms of games (RPGs, LARPDs…).

– The representation of minorities in biographical fictions: are they a way to make scarcely visible social groups more widely represented, or a means, specifically for Hollywood studios, to pretend to be inclusive while carefully selecting safe, consensual figures?

– What about fictional biographies, fictions that revolve around a figure who has only existed in fictional worlds?

In a transdisciplinary perspective, the workshop is open to all approaches which may further the exploration of these questions. Papers have to deal with the USA

Paper proposals (300-500 words approximately) may put forward different fields of study and theoretical frameworks and approaches. They are to be sent, along with a short biography, to Jeanne Ferrier (ferrierjeanne@gmail.com) and Danièle André (daniele.andre.univ.larochelle@gmail.com) by January 17th, 2022.

Please note that to present a paper, it is necessary to be a member of the AFEA (The French Association of American Studies, for which the membership fees are about 60 euros) and to register for the symposium (the register fees are about 60 euros as well).

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Call for submissions

Placing Disability: Personal Stories of Embodied Geography

Edited by Susannah B. Mintz, Professor, Skidmore College, smintz@skidmore.edu and Gregory Fraser, Professor, University of West Georgia, gfraser@wga.edu

**Soliciting 350-word abstracts for original 10-15 page essays on the subject of disability and location, according to the geographical regions listed below. Complete description of the project follows. Please send questions about the project to both editors. Abstracts due Jan. 15, 2022.

We will be seeking completed auto-critical essays for a collection under review at Palgrave-Macmillan. Titled Placing Disability: Personal Stories of Embodied Geography, the collection will present original work that addresses the experience of disability in particular geographical locations. We are interested in essays that directly engage the question of what it is like to be disabled in a specific place, for a collection that will be organized according to geographical type. Placing Disability will expand on current work focused on disability and eco-criticism or disability and spatial theory by situating authors’ reflections on the meaning of embodiment in distinct physical places and by grounding (quite literally) the discourse of disability awareness and activism in personal experience. We imagine a collection that will be as useful in the creative writing workshop as in a Disability Studies seminar or a class on environmental literature, as appealing to general readers of memoir as to scholars of contemporary body theory or the Anthropocene.

The book will be organized in terms of topographies and vistas rather than being bound by the map. This will encourage dialogue between writers within certain kinds of landscapes (the beaches of Florida compared to Colombia, the cities of North America compared to South Asia) as well as between regions themselves (urban spaces compared to prairies or mountains). Some regions are quite unique—the Pacific Northwest, as one example—but most types of location have specific “instances.” Organized according to these conceptual places (listed below), the collection will stimulate writers’ and readers’ understanding not just of disability experience generally but also of the meaning of physical place and how identities are constructed, experienced, and represented in relation to geography.

The writers collected in Placing Disability will propose that disability identity cannot be divorced from location. The book will thus offer its readers what we call a series of geocripistemologies, as authors explore issues of movement, work and play, community and activism, cultural and artistic production, love and sex, access and social services, family, memory, and maturity—informed by the places they inhabit. Like Nancy Mairs, who throughout her collection Waist-High in the World asks readers to rethink the most mundane of life’s tasks no less than the most philosophical conundrums of existence from her position in a wheelchair, “the height of an erect adult’s waist,” or Eli Clare, who writes in Brilliant Imperfection that it is his “shaky balance” that grants him a certain “intimacy with the mountain[s]” of Vermont, Placing Disability’s authors will show us where disability happens as a fresh and exciting way of conceiving of what disability means to our collective grasp of the human condition.

Our collection adds the important element of location to an increasingly sophisticated cultural and critical conversation about disability. Essays in Placing Disability will resist the pressure to draw conclusions or declare priorities; our goal is not to determine that it is “better” to be disabled here rather than there, but instead to seek out a multitude of geo-embodied realities. We envision a collection of high literary and philosophical quality that will represent what is possible in terms of imagining regional disabilities in the fullest possible sense. We ask that writers straddle the creative/scholarly threshold—in the manner of Clare and Mairs—braiding theoretically inflected examinations of place with personal, perhaps lyrically told, tales.

About the Editors

Susannah B. Mintz is a professor of English at Skidmore College. She has published extensively as a writer of creative nonfiction, with essays in American Literary Review, The Writer’s Chronicle, Epiphany, Ninth Letter, Michigan Quarterly Review, and elsewhere. She was the winner of the 2014 South Loop National Essay Prize and a finalist for both the 2010 William Allen nonfiction prize and the Epiphany chapbook contest in 2015. Her work has received special mention from Best American Essays 2010 and the Pushcart Prize Anthology 2018. A short memoir titled “Match Dot Comedy” appeared as a Kindle Single in 2013. A specialist in disability studies and scholar of autobiography, she is also the author of four monographs, including Unruly Bodies: Life Writing by Women with Disabilities (2007), Hurt and Pain: Literature and the Suffering Body (2014), and The Disabled Detective: Sleuthing Disability in Contemporary Crime Fiction (2019), and co-editor of three volumes: a critical anthology on the essayist Nancy Mairs, the Long Eighteenth Century volume of Bloomsbury’s forthcoming Cultural History of Disability, and the two-volume Gale-Cengage reference work Disability Experiences. A memoir called Love Affair in the Garden of Milton: Poetry, Loss, and the Meaning of Unbelief is just out from LSU Press. www.susannahbmintz.com

Gregory Fraser is Professor of English at the University of West Georgia University, outside Atlanta. He is the author of four poetry collections: Strange Pietà (Texas Tech University Press, 2003), Answering the Ruins (2009), Designed for Flight (2014), and Little Armageddon (2021), all from Northwestern University Press. He is also the co-author of the workshop textbook Writing Poetry (Palgrave-Macmillan, 2008) and the critical writing textbook Analyze Anything (Bloomsbury, 2012). Fraser’s poetry, which often addresses themes of disability, illness, and place, has appeared in journals including The New Yorker, The Paris Review, The Southern Review, Ploughshares, and The Gettysburg Review. He is the recipient of numerous awards for his writing, including grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Guggenheim Foundation.

Conceptual regions:

Coastlines

The far North and the far South

The Desert

The Northwest

The Country

The Heartland

The City

The Burbs

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Memories of War in Other Worlds: Approaches to War Literature and Memories from the Global South

Conference June 15-18, 2022 Virtual
American Comparative Literature Association

Deadline for Submissions: January 15, 2022

contact email:

Memories of military conflicts from both combatants and non-combatants alike have been a key tool in analyzing the unique traumas and socio-cultural affects of modern warfare. Scholars such as Samuel Hynes and Paul Fussell have done seminal work in articulating theoretical approaches to understanding the memories of bearing witness to modern war. Yet, mainstream war literature largely recounts the white voices from the West. Building further on the works of scholars such as Santanu Das, David Omissi, Franziska Roy and others this seminar seeks to capture the voices of the Global South and their perceptions of modern wars, from the mass global conflicts of the World Wars, to other wars that have continued to be waged in the postcolonial world without being afforded a significant space in Western consciousness. In analyzing primary sources such as letters, memoirs, biographies and including the fictional representations of modern conflicts created by authors from the Global South this seminar seeks to include the authorial voices which have historically been denied a space in the mainstream memorializations of major conflicts. The scope of the seminar includes non-Western perspectives on global wars as well as their approaches to localized regional conflicts and how the experiences of combat and wartime rupture have shaped discourses of culture, literature and collective memory. This seminar seeks to ask what theoretical approaches can be conceptualized through postcolonial theory and other strategies of reading to approach conflict narratives not located in the Western metropole. Locating questions of race, colonial legacies, generational and cultural traumas of the non-Western world and decolonization within the understanding of war narratives would be a prime focus and in scope the discussions aim to incorporate non-white voices from conflicts across Latin America, Africa and Asia to attempt a more holistic and inclusive understanding of legacies of modern conflicts that continue to shape our world. What are the reformulations to received Western perspectives to postcolonial regional geopolitics that can be achieved by a comparative literary and analytical approach to texts recounting the violent ruptures and eruptions of these regions? How do we alter our approach to war literature by including the voices previously marginalized in canonical literary discourse?

For further information regarding the conference please visit the FAQ page for the American Comparative Literature Association: https://www.acla.org/annual-meeting-2022

To submit paper abstracts please access the submission form on the ACLA conference website: https://www.acla.org/node/add/paper

Please search for the relevant seminar titled ‘Memories of War in Other Worlds: Approaches to War Literature and Memories from the Global South’, from the drop-down menu at the end of the submission form to ensure that your abstract gets submitted to the right seminar.

(Note: Prospective presenters have to create a login account on the ACLA website prior to the submission of their paper abstract)

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CfP for Special Issue of Life Writing (Routledge)

‘The Translation Memoir’

deadline for submissions:  January 14, 2022

The translation memoir can be defined as a reflexive writing practice on the personal and political intersection between writing and translation.Translation memoirs use writing to explore the practice of translation and continue translation’s creative and critical work in different forms. Recent years have seen a boom in the publications of translation memoirs and essays, with authors in the genre encompassing translators such as Kate Briggs (2017), Mireille Gansel (2012), Corinna Gepner (2019), Gregory Rabassa (2005) and Jennifer Croft (2019).  These have engaged creative-critical reflections on the affective, political and transcultural work of translating literary texts, questioning the literary conventions which separate reading and writing, writing and translation. The translation memoir has also participated in a wider postmodern philosophical shift in the rethinking of identity and autobiography [Karpinsky 2012], engaging a form of authorial self-retrieval from within the dominant identity discourses of authorship, nationality, gender and the self. By highlighting the fluidity of national and cultural identities [Jhumpa Lahiri 2016], translation memoirs investigate otherness from the perspective of translation, interrogating the limits of national and gender narratives through the practice of rewriting the text and the self in other languages. Outside of the translation memoir as defined above, explorations of the relationship between translation and autobiographical memory, translation and the archive can also be found in works such as Anne Carson’s Nox for example, or in the creative-critical practice of Clive Scott. These engage in a wider reflection on the relationship between translation and memory, translation and the survival of the text. Participants are invited to send proposals for articles which explore any aspect of the translation memoir as a creative and philosophical investigation of translation through life writing. As well as analysing the translation memoir as a form of self-authorization of the translator as writer, participants are invited to reflect more widely on the impact of the translation memoir on the fields of translation and translator studies, philosophy, history and life writing. Does the translation memoir invite us to expand the definitions of what we consider a translation?  What new forms of writing can emerge from rethinking the self in relation to translation? How does the translation memoir bring to the fore and narrate the cultural differences and power differentials with which the work of translation must often contend? What sets the translation memoir apart from other memoirs? What sets the translation memoir apart from translator autobiographies? What translation theories, what forms of literary criticism have paved the way for the boom in translation-memoir writing we are witnessing today?

Please email your abstracts to Dr. Delphine Grass d.grass@lancaster.ac.uk and Dr. Lily Robert-Foley lily.robert-foley@univ-montp3.fr with ‘Translation Memoir Abstract’ as subject heading. Deadline for Abstracts: January 14th, 2022. Deadline for completed manuscripts: April 15th, 2022.

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Register for the 2022 International Symposium on Autoethnography and Narrative
Registration for the 2022 International Symposium on Autoethnography and Narrative is now live! The conference will occur via Zoom on January 3-5, 2022. Eastern Standard Time (EST) will be used for all conference activities.

On January 4-5, there will be dozens of sessions featuring more than 150 individual submissions. Kitrina Douglas and David Carless will give the keynote address, and there will be spotlight sessions with Renata Ferdinand, Art Bochner, Sandra Faulkner, Norman Denzin, Carolyn Ellis, Robin Boylorn, Mark Freeman, Dan Harris, Ken Gergen, Mary Weems, Fetaui Iosefo, Elyse Pineau, Bryant Keith Alexander, Craig Gingrich-Philbrook, Alec Grant, Stacy Holman Jones, Ragan Fox, Keith Berry, David Purnell, Susan Krieger, Phiona Stanley, and Chris Poulos.

On January 3, there will also be four workshops led by Kakali Bhattacharya, Jonathan Wyatt, Marquese McFerguson, and Amy Arellano and Christina Ivey

Registration for the general conference [January 4-5] is $25 (USD). Only those who have registered for the conference will have access to the keynote and primary conference sessions. To participate in the workshops [January 3], there will be an additional $25 registration fee.

The times for the workshops, keynote, individual submissions, and spotlight sessions are still being finalized; the times and the conference program will be available on December 1, 2021.

For more information about the conference, including how to register, visit www.iaani.org.

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Cleopatra and the Celebrity of Infinite Vareity (edited collection)

deadline for submissions:
December 31, 2021
Dr. Courtney A. Druzak (DigiPen Institute of Technology) and Margaret J. Yankovich, M.I. (Independent Scholar), editors

According to Stacy Schiff in her acclaimed 2010 biography of Cleopatra VII, Egypt’s last queen was “A goddess as a child, a queen at eighteen, [and] a celebrity soon thereafter.” That is to say, Cleopatra has lived on in the imaginations of scholars, artists, and storytellers to the effect that her multifaceted legacy– as, per Schiff, “an asteroid, a video game, a cliche, a cigarette, a slot machine, a strip club, a synonym for Elizabeth Taylor”–has long overshadowed her brief life as a mortal, and catapulted her into the stratosphere of celebrity. In the almost 2,000 years of history that have unfolded since her death in 30 BCE, her life and her person have been consistently appropriated and reappropriated, her celebrity and larger-than-life legacy performed in countless artistic imitations and interpretations. That Cleopatra has defeated the obsolescence of death and the passing of time to become one of greatest celebrity figures of both the Western and Eastern worlds is a subject that begs for further scholarly interrogation.

It is with this framework in mind that we invite scholars of diverse academic disciplines–literature, art, cultural studies, history, and more–to submit papers for inclusion in Cleopatra and the Celebrity of Infinite Variety, an edited collection of works on Cleopatra and legacy/performance of her celebrity in the popular imagination. We have strong interest from a publisher for this project.

Some topics for this interdisciplinary edited collection include, but are not limited to:

-Cleopatra as agentic subject

-Objectified Cleopatra / Cleopatra reproduced as object

-Intersections of race and sexuality in her portrayals in art and literature

-Cleopatra in children’s literature

-Western vs. Eastern perceptions of Cleopatra, particularly through a historical lens

-Readings of recent biographical works on Cleopatra (such as Schiff’s biography as well as Alberto Angelo’s 2021 biography)

-Commodifications of Cleopatra and her legacy

-Representations of Cleopatra in artistic/visual media (painting, sculpture, print, design, film, theater, video games)

-Cleopatra in fashion / fashion inspired by Cleopatra

Interested scholars should submit abstracts of approximately 300 words, along with brief author bios, to cleopatraandcelebrity@gmail.com by December 31, 2021 for review. Emerging and experienced scholars are both encouraged to apply. A decision regarding all submitted abstracts will be made no later than mid-January, with notifications sent by January 31, 2022. If an abstract is accepted for inclusion in the collection, the first draft of the proposed work will be due October 1, 2022. Works should be between 5,000-7,000 words, and citations should be in Chicago Notes-Bibliography style. A total of no more than five images can be used per essay, and contributors are responsible for attaining all rights and paying all fees for images used in their essays.

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Courtney A. Druzak holds a PhD in English from Duquesne University. She currently works as an Assistant Professor of English at DigiPen Institute of Technology in Redmond, WA, where she teaches writing and literature. Her work is focused on the early modern period and ecofeminism, although she also holds a special interest in Cleopatra as both historical figue and celebrity. She can be reached at courtney.druzak@digipen.edu.

Margaret J. Yankovich is a graduate of Rutgers University School of Communication and Information where she received a M. I. in Library Science. A public librarian, she is employed as the Head of Information at the Dorchester County Public Library in Cambridge, Maryland. Margaret also publishes and presents as an independent scholar of horror media.

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“Voicing ‘Woman’ across Media, 1500-1800”

University of California, Santa Barbara

Conference Date: February 24-25, 2022

Abstracts Due: December 31, 2021

The Early Modern Center at the University of California, Santa Barbara is excited to announce this year’s winter conference, “Voicing ‘Woman’ across Media, 1500-1800,” part of the Center’s theme for the year, ‘Woman,’ 1500-1800. The conference is open globally to faculty, graduate students, and independent scholars, and will feature a special panel of distinguished undergraduate students. It will be held virtually (via Zoom) on Thursday, February 24th and Friday, February 25th, 2022. We are also thrilled to announce our two keynote speakers, Dr. Simone Chess (Wayne State University) and Dr. James McNamara (UCSB).

“Voicing ‘Woman’ across Media, 1500-1800” invites presentations that query the early modern concept of ‘woman’ as it is variously constructed or performed by members of all genders in literature, (auto)biography, drama/the stage, music, art, religious texts, film and television, and other media. Instead of focusing broadly on gender, which we recognize has been a key issue of late, we instead want to focus specifically on ‘woman.’ What is ‘woman’? Who is privileged with voicing and defining ‘her’? How have adaptations (both within the early modern period and after the eighteenth century) appropriated and/or interrogated these early modern constructions?

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • writing by and/or about women
  • ‘woman’ as dramatic character or caricature
  • women’s voices as depicted by male writers
  • digitizing ‘woman’ / ‘woman’ in the archive
  • the idea of ‘woman’ in relation(s) to race, sexuality, and/or nationality
  • transfemininity and transmisogyny in depictions of women
  • querying gender in terms of queering ‘woman’ (and vice versa)
  • ‘woman’ within and outside the European context
  • women as travelers and/or women depicted in travel narrative
  • ‘woman’ as icon/iconic
  • representations of women in pamphlet gender debates of the early 17th c.
  • women as unruly and/or resistant
  • ‘warrior’ women
  • women and disability
  • women in religion
  • women’s spaces/the space of (and for) women
  • technology and women
  • print history and women
  • feminist and/or female-centered adaptations of early modern drama

We invite and envision both panel presentations and ten-minute roundtable presentations. Please submit abstracts of 150 to 200 words and a one-page CV to emcfellow@gmail.com by December 31, 2021.

Registration is now open for the Southern Lives Workshop, which runs from Monday 6 – Tuesday 7 December. This is a hybrid event: attendees can choose to register for either online or in-person attendance. 

Click here to register: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/southernlivesworkshop-tickets-194992727497

Location: Wolfson College, with sessions on 6 Dec at the Pitt Rivers Museum and TORCH.

Co-organised by Elleke Boehmer and Katherine Collins, this event brings together writers and scholars in the oceanic humanities, postcolonial and Global South studies and polar studies, to explore how the high southern latitudes are imagined through life-writing. With kind thanks to the British Academy Small Grants fund and the Leverhulme Trust for their support.

Please see the Workshop Schedule, which is included below, for more information.

All the best,

The OCLW Team

Schedule: Southern Lives Workshop

MONDAY 6 December 2021

13:30-14:30: Group visit to the Pitt Rivers Museum.

15:00-16:15: Welcome to the workshop & Southern Lives book proposal discussion.

16:15-16:30: Short break

16:30-17:30: First paper session: Knowing and unknowing the South (Elleke Boehmer, Katherine Collins, Bernhard Schirg)

TUESDAY 7 December 2021

09:30-10:30: Professor Boaventura de Sousa Santos (Coimbra): Responses, On Southern Lives, followed by Q and A.

10:30-11:00: Tea/Coffee

11:00-12:15: Second paper session: ‘Far southern resonances and images’ (Elizabeth Leane, Carolyn Philpott, Joanna Price, Joe Shaughnessy, Priyanka Shivadas)

12:30-13:15: Lunch

13:15-14:30: Third paper session: ‘Perspectives on time, change, the environment’ (Confidence Joseph, Charne Lavery, Isaac Ndlovu, Emma Parker)

14:30-15:00: Coffee/tea

15:00-16:15: Fourth paper session: Imagining southern spaces (Sarah Comyn, Archie Davies, Porscha Fermanis, Cristóbal Pérez Barra, Pablo Wainschenker)

16:15-16:30: Short break

16:30-17:15: Feedback

17:15-18:00: Light buffet dinner

18:00-19:30: Final session: Creative-critical crossovers in the South (Elizabeth Lewis Williams, Khutso Mabokela, Louis Rogers)

Close

Oxford Centre for Life-Writing
Wolfson College
Linton Road
Oxford
OX2 6UD
https://www.oclw.web.ox.ac.uk

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CFP: Popular Culture Association Annual Conference-Biographies Area (Virtual Conference–April 13-16, 2022)–Submission Deadline Extension: 12/5/21

The Popular Culture Association will be holding its annual conference virtually  April 13-16, 2022.

The Biographies Area is soliciting papers that examine the connections between biography and popular culture. Papers and full panel presentations regarding any aspect of popular culture and biography are encouraged. Potential topics might include:

– Biography and entertainment, art, music, theater
– Biography and film
– Biography and criminal justice
– Television programs about biography
– Biography and urban legends
– Biography and folklore
– Biography and literature
– Scholarly Biography
– Controversial Biography
– Psychoanalysis and Biography
– Historical Biography
– Political Biography
– Autobiography

Sessions are scheduled in 1½ hour slots, typically with four papers or speakers per standard session.  Presentations should not exceed 20 minutes.

On your submission, please include title of paper, abstract, and contact information.

Submission Deadline Extension: 12/5/21

Please go to this link to submit your paper:

 https://pcaaca.org/conference/submitting-paper-proposal-pca-conference 

Please direct any queries to the Biographies Area chair:
Susie Skarl
Associate Professor/Urban Affairs Librarian
UNLV Libraries
Las Vegas, NV 89154

susie.skarl@unlv.edu OR susieskarl@gmail.com

Contact Info:

Susie Skarl
Associate Professor/Urban Affairs Librarian
UNLV Libraries
Las Vegas, NV 89154

Contact Email:

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Moving Biography Summer School

International summer school in Beirut, 1-8 June 2022

Deadline for Applications: 30 November 2021

The Orient-Institut Beirut (OIB) in collaboration with the American University of Beirut (AUB) and the Global (De)Centre (GDC) invites doctoral and postdoctoral researchers to apply for an international Summer School, entitled Moving Biography, that will take place in Beirut/Lebanon from 1 to 8 June 2022.

Our Summer School will explore the various etymologies and connotations that the term “biography” carries in different languages and their various complexities. The English term “biography” comes from the Greek words “bios” (life) and “graphia” (writing). As such, the word expresses a tension between conceptions of life as a narrative (everyone has a biography), and the actual practice of writing about particular lives. The genre of biography socializes us into expectations for our own lives. In contrast, the Arabic term “sīra” conceives of biography as a journey. Deriving from the verb “sāra” (to travel), it has been used, in particular, to refer to “al-sīra al-nabawiyya” (the prophetic biography), the life journey of the Prophet Muhammad. Al-sīra al-nabawiyya constitutes a key source of Islamic studies, next to the Qur’ān and the “ḥadīth” (tradition). Whose stories get written and what they include profoundly shapes how we understand the world and whose lives matter within it. Biographies tend to conform to notions of nation, ethnicity, religion, or class, despite the opportunity, articulated in the Arabic “sīra”, for following lives across boundaries. Probing the sometimes messy contradictions between real-life stories and conceptions of self, between personal and communal identities, Moving Biography brings together different perspectives from a range of disciplines (anthropology, art history, cultural studies, gender studies, literary studies, history, political studies, and sociology) to question disciplinary assumptions and decenter the genre.

Moving Biography will focus on three main themes: (1) questions of data (2) the act of creation, and (3) the importance of the social and historical context of biographies.

  1. We will use the topic of biography as a broad, generative umbrella under which to explore cultural and intellectual inequality. The destinations towards which lives move and their means of travel reveal not only the unequalness of infrastructures of circulation but also the radical inequalities characterizing the landscapes within which lives get lived. How do fiction and non-fiction merge in the writing of lives? How do biographies deal with uncertainties and gaps in the life stories/journeys that are recorded? These questions are all the more urgent when archival research is restricted, be it by war, other social and political conditions, or the very form of the archive itself. Biography forces us to rethink what counts as relevant data. Does an author’s fiction count as data? How do we conceive of autobiographical writing in works of fiction? Would records of quaint past-time activities or other ephemera count for a politician or a prophet? Observing the compliance of biography with certain scholarly boxes encourages new methodologies including considerations of ownership, archival management, and social infrastructure.
  2. Biography can shed an important light on creation. Two models dominate: creation as an isolated, personal act, or a connected, interactive, ongoing one that may or may not involve others. These lead, in turn, to two tactics: to embed the individual in the cultural/historical context in which he or she lived, or to tell the story of an intellectual, literary, or artistic movement or genre. Our interdisciplinary, comparative perspective suggests that creation is never purely individual. Methodologically, we explore how the circulation of ideas affected important thinkers, and wonder at how such networks have not been studied systematically for individuals who live(d) at the social margins. We also include the things an individual makes—the transient, ephemeral acts of imagination—as part of the biography of a person or community, even if no single stylistic motive or outcome unifies them.
  3. We will use the topic of biography to rethink disciplines and social institutions. How are biographies conceived in different spatial and temporal settings and in different academic disciplines? Biography offers a method for rethinking personhood/social being. What constitutes “a life” cross-culturally in and through time? How are sets of biographies related to “generational” contingencies and concerns? As C. Wright Mills argued, one cannot separate a biography from history and context. What notions of history and time does biography foreground? How do past, present, and future converge in real-life stories? In what ways are social persons or the idea of biographical founders essential to the endurance and effervescence of academic disciplines? An in-depth discussion about these questions will prompt greater reflexivity in each of our disciplines.

In order to explore the above, we invite the participation of 20 PhD students and postdoctoral researchers in the humanities and social sciences engaged in research relating to biography/sīra in the Middle East and in other regions, in particular in the global south, to join us in Beirut for a one-week Summer School in June 2022. The school will be preceded by a preparatory phase kicked off by a series of keynote lectures and the launch of an online platform, in which the selected participants can upload summaries of their ongoing projects, expand on their research questions, share literature and start an informal exchange in the run up to the Summer School.

The one-week school will convene an interdisciplinary group of students and faculty who will each bring their own disciplinary background and assumptions to the conversation. It will be organized around a combination of plenary talks by invited scholars, working sessions by the Summer School organizers about the theoretical issues at stake, and workshops where participants will present their ongoing research in small groups to get feedback and critique. Three field visits to institutions and initiatives in Lebanon that are implicated in the forming of biographies and one plenary discussion with practitioners from the field will form an integral part of the Summer School. We believe it is especially important to hold the Summer School in Beirut, to highlight the importance of international scholarly exchange at a time of crisis and to understand the challenges one faces when thinking about biography and the fragility of data.

Confirmed speakers include Marilyn Booth (University of Oxford), Kirsten Buick (University of New Mexico), Wilhelm Hemecker (University of Vienna), Tarif Khalidi (American University of Beirut), Jean Said Makdisi (writer and scholar), Lina Saneh Majdalani (independent artist), Sherene Seikaly (University of California, Santa Barbara), Daniel Schönpflug (Institute for Advanced Study Berlin) and Salim Tamari (Birzeit University).

Travel to/from Beirut and accommodation will be covered. The program is aimed at researchers in the humanities and social sciences from the region and abroad who will present their ongoing projects in relation to the topic of biography. The researchers’ work should be clearly relevant to the themes of the Summer School and use original source material. The working language will be English. The application should be in English and consist of

  •  a CV
  • a 3 to 5-page outline of the project the applicant is currently working on
  • the names and contact details of two potential referees (no letters of recommendation required)

to be sent by Email in one PDF document no later than 30 November 2021 to movingbiography@orient-institut.org

The Summer School is funded by the Volkswagen Foundation and organised by
Peggy Levitt, Wellesley College/Harvard University
Nadia von Maltzahn, Orient-Institut Beirut (OIB)
Sonja Mejcher-Atassi, American University of Beirut (AUB)
Kirsten Scheid, American University of Beirut (AUB).

It is a partnership between the Orient-Institut Beirut (OIB), the American University in Beirut (AUB) and the Global (De)Centre (GDC).

The Orient-Institut Beirut (OIB)
The Orient-Institut Beirut (OIB) is an academically independent German research institute and part of the Max Weber Foundation. It is mainly funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. It conducts interdisciplinary research on the Arab world and the region of West Asia and North Africa at large. Its research community comprises long-term research associates from Germany and short-term visiting fellows from all over the world, who represent the major disciplines of the humanities and social sciences, including Islamic and Arab studies, history and anthropology of the Middle East, as well as sociology and political sciences. The OIB aims to foster academic relations across the MENA region and increasingly conducts its research in transregional perspectives. See https://www.orient-institut.org/about/

The American University in Beirut (AUB)
Founded in 1866, the American University of Beirut bases its educational philosophy, standards, and practices on the American liberal arts model of higher education. A teaching-centered research university, AUB has around 800 instructional faculty and a student body of around 8,000 students. The University encourages freedom of thought and expression and seeks to graduate men and women committed to creative and critical thinking, life-long learning, personal integrity, civic responsibility, and leadership. See https://www.aub.edu.lb/AboutUs/Pages/default.aspx

The Global (De)Centre (GDC)
The Global (De)Centre (GDC) is a platform bringing together a growing network of interdisciplinary scholars, creative practitioners and managers, and activists from across the world who are committed to challenging intellectual and cultural inequality. The GDC seeks to deconstruct and reconstruct by looking closely at how the methods and categories we have traditionally used to create knowledge bring to light certain “truths” while obscuring others. We are also committed to charting a constructive way forward—to create new ways of producing and disseminating knowledge and new social interventions—that unsettle longstanding cultural and intellectual hierarchies and bring a wider range of actors and epistemologies into conversation with one another (reconstruction). All four Summer School organizers are members of the GDC. See http://globaldecentre.world/gdc/about-gdc

Related date:
November 30, 2021
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Call for Papers
International and Interdisciplinary Conference

Hybridity in Life Writing: How Text and Images Work Together to Tell a Life
Organizers: Clare Brant (King’s College London), Arnaud Schmitt (Bordeaux University & LARCA, Université de Paris)
Venue: Université de Paris, Paris, 7–8 July, 2022
Keynote Speaker: Pr. Teresa Bruś (Wrocław University)

  • Please submit an abstract of approx. 250 words and a short bionote to

clare.brant@kcl.ac.uk and arnaud.schmitt@u-bordeaux.fr by 30 November, 2021 at the latest.

It might seem that, to some extent, almost all visual content in autobiographical texts is visual aid. But what is it in aid of? Of the text, somehow. Victor Burgin notes that “we rarely see a photograph in use which does not have a caption or a title, it is more usual to encounter photographs attached to long texts, or with copy superimposed over them. Even a photograph which has no actual writing on or around it is traversed by language when it is ‘read’ by a viewer.” As powerful as images can be, and they frequently outshine the text that precedes or follows them, their narrative potential is nevertheless tethered to the text that introduces them or comments them a posteriori. In other words, the text has the first or last word, it frames the picture and, in a way, ‘tames’ its impact: a picture is at the text’s service. And yet, it can also be argued that images contradict texts in the same Derridean way as texts and more particularly words contradict each other, or at least unsettle themselves. In Picture Theory, W. J. T. Mitchell states that he wants “to concentrate, however, on the kinds of photographic essays which contain strong textual elements, where the text is most definitely an ‘invasive’ and even domineering element.” Thus, even if and when they are supposed to work together, words and images in a memoir establish a balance of power, one that requires investigation as the autobiographical narrative of a hybrid memoir depends on this very balance.
From a historical point of view, this balance of power may also result from the evolution of each medium’s status, as an art form or cultural artefact. For instance, it can be argued that the first memoir written by a photographer is Talbot’s The Pencil of Nature. Teresa Bruś claims that “The Pencil of Nature, presented to the public in 1844, is the first autobiographical book of a photographer. […] aligning the ‘art’ of photography with a rhetorical, if not a literary, project.” But in Photography and Literature, François Brunet points out that, contrary to what might have been expected, Talbot’s effort had little effect on the publishing world, and this “estrangement of photography from literature,” with the odd exception, lasted until the end of the 19th century. According to him, nothing much happened before the beginning of the 20th century and “the growing recognition of photography as a distinct art form.” It makes sense that photography’s relation with literature very much depended on its evolving status.[1]
On a more positive note, hybridity may also be seen to operate beyond this semantic and cultural balance of power and to aim at an additional meaning created thanks to intermediality at a level where, despite their intrinsic cognitive features and differences, text and images are able to produce content that they would not have been able to produce had they been kept separate. In a way, it hinges on how a book balances text and images, how it ‘monitors’ intermediality. But Gilles Mora writes that “photography has rarely generated autobiographical works able to exist without the support of language” (“la photographie a rarement produit des œuvres autobiographiques qui puissent se passer de l’appui du langage”). Maybe because one of the main (if not the only) functions of photographs in life writing is to authenticate. Roland Barthes is mostly responsible for the widespread belief that photography is better at accessing the past than words, principally through two assertions he made in Camera Lucida: “it [photography] does not invent; it is authentication incarnate. […] Every photograph certifies a presence” (“elle [la photographie] n’invente rien ; elle est l’authentification même. […] Toute photographie est un certificat de presence”) and “It seems that Photography always carries its referent with it […]” (“On dirait que la Photographie emporte toujours son référent avec elle […]”). The role of non-photographic images in hybrid memoirs or autobiographical works is thus more complex as paintings for instance do not have this ability to authenticate and similarly to words do not “carry their referent with them.” However, in a post-PhotoShop age, the way photographs have the ability to tamper with or even falsify “their referent” can be seen as highly problematic in an autobiographical context.
The same can be said about graphic memoirs, a booming field, as drawings are also very low on the ‘authentication scale’. Nevertheless, Narratologist Robyn Warhol made the following remark regarding them: “The juxtaposition of cartooning with verbal memoir offers methods of representing subjectivity that are unprecedented in traditional autobiography. Indeed, as Versaci asserts ‘while many prose memoirists address the complex nature of identity and the self, comic book memoirists are able to represent such complexity in ways that cannot be captured in words alone’.” But is this “subjectivity” represented separately or jointly? And in the latter case, how? Also not as authenticating as photographs, paintings remain nevertheless a potential narrative resource for any autobiographer. In The Privileged Eye, Max Kozloff reminds us that “a main distinction between a painting and a photograph is that the painting alludes to its content, whereas the photograph summons it, from wherever and whenever, to us.” It might only be “alluding to a content,” but a painting in a memoir simply is another form of hybridity and a way for an author to diversify the work’s content. Stanley Cavell wrote that we might say that “a painting is a world” and that “a photograph is of the world” but a painting in many ways continue to allude to the world, and more precisely to the autobiographer’s world.
Finally, beyond the intermedial question, there is the issue of autobiography, and more specifically autobiography at the beginning of the 21st century, a different type from previous centuries, one more informed of the limits of referential writing and more than ever aware of its importance; one also that has often outgrown its usual vessel—even though the latter remains its most prestigious one in terms of official recognition­—and has branched out into social and often more visual media (just one example among so many: the renowned American photographer Stephen Shore’s Instagram account on which he posts one picture everyday). Sidonie Smith and Julia Watson have identified and explored “the visual-verbal-virtual contexts of life narrative” which have multiplied through for example performance and visual arts, autobiographical films and videos, and variously curated online lives.
Véronique Montémont rightfully points out that Philippe Lejeune, one of the most prominent life writing theorists, “does not mention photography because for him autobiography involves enunciation, a narrator in other terms.” And yet photography has entered the field of autobiography in a multitude of ways. In Picturing Ourselves: Photography & Autobiography, Linda Haverty Rugg sums up her study’s main objectives thus: “This book explores the intersection of these two debates—the point at which photographs enter the autobiographical act. What (or how) do photographs mean in the context of an autobiography?” The aim of this symposium is to explore the point at which an image, any image, whether fixed or moving (in vlogs for instance), enters the autobiographical act and confronts the verbal form.

Keynote Speaker: Pr. Teresa Bruś (Wrocław University), author of the forthcoming Face Forms in Photography and Life Writing of the 1920s and 1930s

CFP – Gender and the Sea: Women and Men in Maritime History

Guest editor: dr. Djoeke van Netten

For centuries sailors thought that the presence of women on board would mean bad luck: rough weather, big waves, and other disasters were sure to follow. Through notions like these, women were supposedly excluded from the maritime domain. Therefore, the ship and the sea have predominantly been perceived as a space for men. Yet, the presence of women at sea has increased in the last century. This volume of the Yearbook for Women’s History therefore asks: to what extent was the sea ever a masculine space? This volume examines if and how women were part of seafaring communities, maritime undertakings, and maritime culture.

In the field of maritime history, the role of women and gender have long been understudied. To enlighten our understanding of the influence and presence of women in the maritime past, this volume of the Yearbook for Women’s History will bring together recent research to provide more insight into the contribution of women to the maritime world, including (but not limited to) maritime industries, seafaring communities, naval warfare, (cruise) tourism, art and literature, and imaginary worlds concerning the sea from antiquity to the twenty-first century.

Besides the role of women, this volume also wants to focus on the broader workings of gender and the role of femininity and masculinity in the maritime world. By doing so, this volume touches on different intersections of gender with other political, socio-economic and cultural phenomena in relation to people’s use, fear, and admiration of the sea.

We welcome contributions that employ different scales of analysis from all over the world. We are looking for articles that vary in length (3000-6000 words) and are written in Dutch or English.

Possible topics include:
– Masculinity and femininity at sea and/or in the maritime world
– The sea as a territory for men and/or women
– Gender and maritime metaphors and myths
– The sea, gender religion and/or superstition
– Women and/or men in flags and ship decoration, e.g. figureheads
– Paintings and portraits
– Women (and children) who travelled by ships, e.g. in a colonial context
– Women who worked in maritime industries (ashore)
– Sailor’s wives
– Female authors and publishers of poems and books regarding the sea
– Women who worked on board in a broad range of professions
– Women in the navy
– Female pirates
– Women on board dressed or disguised as men
– Sea monsters, mermaids and mermen
– Sex and sexuality on board
– Forced migration of women and men, e.g. slave trade

We invite authors from academia, museums and cultural and heritage institutions to submit an abstract. Abstracts (200-300 words) written in English or Dutch are to be submitted by 25 November 2021 to jaarboekvrouwengeschiedenis@gmail.com.

Important dates
25 November 2021 Deadline for abstracts
Early December 2021 Information concerning acceptance sent to the writers
1 April 2022 Submission deadline for articles to be submitted to editorial and peer review
End of August Submission deadline for final versions

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Upcoming Events from the Leon Levy Center for Biography, Oct.-Dec. 2021

Tuesday, October 19, 6 pm

Ruth Franklin on Scandalous Biographers & Their Publishers
in conversation with Laura Marsh, Tim Duggan, Katha Pollitt & Ian Buruma

To register, please click here:

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZ0lde6trTkuGdDE_mQm9OKMaCxM4tx…

When Philip Roth authorized Blake Bailey to write his biography, he told Bailey, “I don’t want you to rehabilitate me. Just make me interesting.” Last spring, when the biography was published, critics’ responses suggested Bailey had succeeded: while some questioned whether his portrayals of Roth’s relationships with women were fair-minded, most lauded the book’s comprehensiveness and verve. All that changed within days when allegations surfaced in the media that Bailey had engaged in sexual misconduct. Amid the resulting scandal, Bailey’s publisher, W.W. Norton, announced it would stop selling the book.

This and other recent literary scandals raise difficult questions for authors, publishers, and readers. Do we have an obligation to consider a writer’s personal conduct when making decisions about whether to publish or buy a book—or do we have an obligation not to? (“Read the book, not the author,” an Amazon reviewer pleads on Bailey’s behalf.) What is the appropriate response to allegations such as the ones raised against Bailey? Has the politicization of our cultural climate gone too far—or not far enough?

Former Leon Levy Fellow Ruth Franklin is a book critic and former editor at The New Republic. Her first biography, Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life (Liveright/W.W. Norton, 2016) won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Biography and was named a New York Times Notable Book of 2016, a Time magazine top nonfiction book of 2016, and a “best book of 2016” by The Boston Globe, the San Francisco Chronicle, NPR, and others. She is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship in biography, a Cullman Fellowship at the New York Public Library, and the Roger Shattuck Prize for Criticism. She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Laura Marsh is the literary editor of the New Republic, and co-host of the Politics of Everything podcast.

Tim Duggan is an executive editor at Henry Holt & Company, a division of Macmillan. The authors he has edited include Timothy Snyder, David Wallace-Wells, Michiko Kakutani, Karan Mahajan, Daniel Mendelsohn, William Boyd, Annie Dillard, and Uzodinma Iweala. The books he has edited include winners of the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Women’s Prize for Fiction, and many finalists for the National Book Award.

Katha Pollitt is a poet, essayist and columnist for The Nation. She has written for many magazines and published numerous books, most recently Pro: Reclaiming Abortion Rights and The Mind-Body Problem (poems).

Ian Buruma, a regular contributor to and former editor of the New York Review of Books, is the author of, among other works: Behind the Mask, God’s Dust, Playing the Game and Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance. Buruma has won several prizes for his books, including the Los Angeles Times Book Prize and the PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay for Theater of Cruelty: Art, Film and the Shadows of War.

Friday, October 15, 2:30 pm:
Molly Peacock on Mary Hiester Reid

to register for this event, please click here:
https://www.92y.org/event/flower-diary.aspx

In her new book, Flower Diary, Former Leon Levy Fellow Molly Peacock weaves together elements of biography, memoir and art history to reveal the world of Mary Hiester Reid, a fascinating, complex woman who insisted on her right to live as a married artist, not as a tragic heroine. A foremother of Georgia O’Keefe, who lived in a subtle menage with her painter husband and a talented younger painter at both the Onteora Artists’ Colony in the Catskills and in Toronto, Heister Reid produced over 300 passionate paintings in which the figures of flowers and trees become like a diary of her life.

Monday, October 18, 4 pm
Victoria Phillips on Eleanor Lansing Dulles
Presented by the Center for the Study of Women and Society and Women Writing Women’s Lives, cosponsored by The Leon Levy Center

to register for this event, please click here:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/women-power-and-intrigue-in-cold-war-berlin…

Victoria Phillips is the author of Martha Graham’s Cold War: The Dance of American Diplomacy (Oxford University Press, 2020), which uncovers the political life of Martha Graham and her particular brand of dance modernism as pro-American propaganda during the global Cold War. A Visiting Fellow in the Department of International History at the London School of Economics, Dr. Phillips is also the director of the Cold War Archival Research Project, History OnLine, and co-founder of the Global Biography Working Group.​

Tuesday, November 2, 6 pm

Debby Applegate on Madam: Polly Adler, Icon of the J​azz Age

in conversation with Gerald Howard

To register for this event, please click here:

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZItc-ioqDIjEtGfQK1VqdjsWceVj1e…

The compulsively readable and sometimes jaw-dropping story of the life of a notorious madam who played hostess to every gangster, politician, writer, sports star and Cafe Society swell worth knowing, and who as much as any single figure helped make the twenties roar—from the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Most Famous Man in America.

Simply put: Everybody came to Polly’s. Pearl “Polly” Adler (1900-1962) was a diminutive dynamo whose Manhattan brothels in the Roaring Twenties became places not just for men to have the company of women but were key gathering places where the culturati and celebrity elite mingled with high society and with violent figures of the underworld—and had a good time doing it.

As a Jewish immigrant from eastern Europe, Polly Adler’s life is a classic American story of success and assimilation that starts like a novel by Henry Roth and then turns into a glittering real-life tale straight out of F. Scott Fitzgerald. She declared her ambition to be “the best goddam madam in all America” and succeeded wildly. Debby Applegate uses Polly’s story as the key to unpacking just what made the 1920s the appallingly corrupt yet glamorous and transformational era that it was and how the collision between high and low is the unique ingredient that fuels American culture.

Debby Applegate won the Pulitzer Prize for Biography for her first book, The Most Famous Man in America: The Biography of Henry Ward Beecher, and is the author of Madam: The Biography of Polly Adler, Icon of the Jazz Age. She holds a Ph.D. in American Studies from Yale University and lives in New Haven, Connecticut.

Gerald Howard recently retired from Doubleday, where he edited two books by Debby Applegate: Madam and The Most Famous Man in America, her biography of Henry Ward Beecher. His essays and reviews have appeared in a variety of publications. He is currently at work on a biographical study of the editor and critic Malcolm Cowley.

Tuesday, November 9, 6 pm

Jason L. Riley on Thomas Sowell

in conversation with Robert A. George

To register for this event, please click here:

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMpfuqtqjosGdXAhWuXlbiZWpOCYvW…

Thomas Sowell is one of the great social theorists of our age. In a career spanning more than a half century, he has written over 30 books, covering topics from economic history and social inequality to political theory, race, and culture. His bold and unsentimental assaults on liberal orthodoxy have endeared him to many admirers but have also enraged fellow intellectuals, the civil-rights establishment, and much of the mainstream media. The result has been a lack of acknowledgment of his scholarship among critics who prioritize political correctness. In the first-ever biography of Sowell, Jason L. Riley gives this iconic thinker his due and responds to the detractors. Maverick showcases Sowell’s most significant writings and traces the life events that shaped his ideas and resulted in a Black orphan from the Jim Crow South becoming one of our foremost public intellectuals.

Jason L. Riley is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and a columnist for the Wall Street Journal, where he has written about politics, economics, education, immigration and social inequality for more than 25 years. He’s also a frequent public speaker and provides commentary for television and radio news outlets. After joining the Journal in 1994, Mr. Riley was named a senior editorial page writer in 2000 and a member of the Editorial Board in 2005. He joined the Manhattan Institute, a public policy think tank focused on urban affairs, in 2015. Mr. Riley is the author of four books: Let Them In: The Case for Open Borders (2008); Please Stop Helping Us: How Liberals Make It Harder for Blacks to Succeed (2014); False Black Power? (2017); and Maverick: A Biography of Thomas Sowell (2021). Born in Buffalo, N.Y., Mr. Riley earned a bachelor’s degree in English from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He lives in suburban New York City.

Robert A. George is a member of the Bloomberg Opinion Editorial Board and columnist. Previously a member of the New York Post and Daily News editorial boards, he has been writing about New York and national issues for more than two decades. He was born in Trinidad and lived in the United Kingdom before moving to the United States. A 1985 graduate of St. John’s College in Annapolis, Maryland, George worked for the Republican National Committee and, following the 1994 midterm elections, Speaker of the House of Representatives Newt Gingrich. George also has been a guest on MSNBC, CNN, and Fox and regularly appears on other political affairs programs. George has written for the conservative National Review, the libertarian Reason and the progressive Huffington Post. He is a cofounder of the Electoral Dysfunction podcast. In addition, George moonlights as a stand-up comic and improviser.

Wednesday, November 10, 5 pm (NB)

Claire Tomalin on HG Wells

in conversation with Edward Mendelson

To register, please click here:​​ https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZcrdu2vqT4qHtLdKVoNn8_KT85eKGT…

Here for the first time, Claire Tomalin brings to life the early years of H. G. Wells, and traces his formation as a writer of extraordinary originality and ambition. Born in 1866, the son of a gardener and a housekeeper, Wells faced poverty and ill health from a young age. At 12, he was taken out of school, torment for a child with intellectual aspirations. Determined, Wells won scholarships and worked towards science degrees. Though he failed his final exams, he was soon writing text books, involving himself in politics, and contributing to newspapers. Still suffering from serious illness, as well as multiple physical breakdowns, Wells understood early on the impulse to escape – through books, art, and his imagination – and he began to make his name by writing short stories. But it wasn’t until the publication of his first novel, The Time Machine, in 1895, that Wells attained the great success he had so longed for. His book, which transformed the way readers saw the world, was hailed as an extraordinary accomplishment.

Until the period leading up to the first world war, Wells wrote books at an almost unprecedented speed – about science, mysteries, and prophecies; aliens, planets, and space travel; mermaids, the bottom of the sea, and distant islands. He chronicled social change, and forecasted the future of technology and politics; formed friendships with Winston Churchill, Henry James, and Bernard Shaw, and shaped the minds of the young and old. His most famous works have never been out of print, and his influence is still felt today. In this unforgettable portrait of this complicated man, Tomalin makes clear his early period was crucial in making him into the great writer he became, and that by concentrating on the young Wells, we get the best of his life, and of his work.

Claire Tomalin was born Claire Delavenay in 1933 in London. She was educated at Cambridge University and worked in publishing and journalism. Her first book, a life of Mary Wollstonecraft, came out in 1974, the year in which her husband, the journalist Nicholas Tomalin, was killed, leaving her with four children. She has written biographies of Katherine Mansfield, Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, Samuel Pepys and the actress Mrs Jordan, and most recently a memoir of her own life. She is married to the playwright and novelist Michael Frayn.

Edward Mendelson is the Lionel Trilling Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University. He is the literary executor of the Estate of W. H. Auden and the author or editor of several books about Auden’s work, including Early Auden and Later Auden. He is also the author of The Things That Matter: What Seven Classic Novels Have to Say About the Stages of Life about nineteenth- and twentieth-century novels, and Moral Agents: Eight Twentieth-Century American Writers. His work on Thomas Pynchon includes Pynchon: A Collection of Critical Essays. He is the editor of annotated editions of novels by Thomas Hardy, George Meredith, Arnold Bennett, H. G. Wells, and Anthony Trollope. With Michael Seidel he co-edited Homer to Brecht: The European Epic and Dramatic Traditions.

Thursday, November 11, 6 pm

Julia Sweig on Lady Bird Johnson

in conversation with Debby Applegate

To register, please click here:​​ https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZcudeyhqTorGtSnjx4K9jzwW3tbaew…

Perhaps the most underestimated First Lady of the twentieth century, Lady Bird Johnson was also one of the most accomplished and often her husband’s secret weapon. Managing the White House in years of national upheaval, through the civil rights movement and the escalation of the Vietnam War, Lady Bird projected a sense of calm and, following the glamorous and modern Jackie Kennedy, an old-fashioned image of a First Lady. In truth, she was anything but. As the first First Lady to run the East Wing like a professional office, she took on her own policy initiatives, including the most ambitious national environmental effort since Teddy Roosevelt. Occupying the White House during the beginning of the women’s liberation movement, she hosted professional women from all walks of life in the White House, including urban planning and environmental pioneers like Jane Jacobs and Barbara Ward, encouraging women everywhere to pursue their own careers, even if her own style of leadership and official role was to lead by supporting others.

Where no presidential biographer has understood the full impact of Lady Bird Johnson’s work in the White House, Julia Sweig is the first to draw substantially on Lady Bird’s own voice in her White House diaries to place Claudia Alta “Lady Bird” Johnson center stage and to reveal a woman ahead of her time—and an accomplished politician in her own right.

Dr. Julia Sweig is a scholar and author whose extensive short- and long-form work covers Cold War American foreign policy and diplomatic history in the Americas, especially Cuba. As a policy practitioner, she led the Latin American program at the Council on Foreign Relations for 15 years. Her new book, Lady Bird Johnson: Hiding in Plain Sight, a New York Times bestseller, shifts Julia’s focus to American history and politics. Moving into broadcast media, her ABC News podcast, In Plain Sight: Lady Bird Johnson, is an eight-episode, immersive audio documentary.

Debby Applegate won the Pulitzer Prize for Biography for her first book, The Most Famous Man in America: The Biography of Henry Ward Beecher, and is the author of Madam: The Biography of Polly Adler, Icon of the Jazz Age. She holds a Ph.D. in American Studies from Yale University and lives in New Haven, Connecticut.​

Wednesday, December 8, 6 pm

Kati Marton on Angela Merkel

in conversation with Eliza Griswold

To register, please click here:​​ https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUtdeqprD0sGdfUSbj-g3f9LmPxZzu…

Acclaimed biographer Kati Marton set out to pierce the mystery of how Angela Merkel achieved all this. And she found the answer in Merkel’s political genius: in her willingness to talk with adversaries rather than over them, her skill at negotiating without ever compromising on what’s most important to her, her canniness in appointing political rivals to her cabinet and exacting their policies so they have no platform to run against her, the humility to allow others to take credit for things done in tandem, the wisdom to stay out of the papers and off Twitter, and the vision to take advantage of crises to enact bold change.

Famously private, the Angela Merkel who emerges in The Chancellor is a role model for anyone interested in gaining and keeping power while holding onto one’s moral convictions—and for anyone looking to understand how to successfully bridge huge divisions within society. No modern leader has so ably confronted Russian aggression, provided homes to over a million refugees, and calmly unified Europe at a time when other countries are becoming more divided. But Marton also describes Merkel’s many challenges, such as her complicated relationship with President Obama, who she at one point refused to speak to.

Kati Marton is the author of True Believer: Stalin’s Last American Spy; Enemies of the People: My Family’s Journey to America, a National Book Critics Circle Award finalist; The Great Escape: Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World; Hidden Power: Presidential Marriages That Shaped Our History; Wallenberg; The Polk Conspiracy; and A Death in Jerusalem. She is an award-winning former NPR and ABC News correspondent. She was born in Hungary and lives in New York City.​

Eliza Griswold is the author, most recently, of Amity and Prosperity: One Family and the Fracturing of America, a 2018 Times Notable Book and a Times Critics’ Pick, for which she won the Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction, in 2019. Griswold has been awarded various prizes, including the J. Anthony Lukas Prize, a PEN Translation Prize, and the Rome Prize for her poetry. Her second book of poems, If Men, Then, was published in 2020. She is currently a Distinguished Writer-in-Residence at New York University.​

Deadline for Submissions Nov. 30, 2021

Call for Papers

The conference is rescheduled to 14-17 June 2022 and opens the call for papers for NEW submissions.

PLEASE NOTE:

If you already have an accepted abstract in the IABA conference, please follow these steps:

  1. sign in to your Oxford Abstracts account, open your submission and click on “Amend” on the top of the abstract window
  2. reply on the added question (choose if you wish to modify your abstract, leave it as it is or withdraw it). If you wish to modify your abstract, you can make the modifcations immediately or come back and modify later, until 30 November 2021
  3. click “submit” at the bottom of submission form to submit your reply.

Oxford Abstracts: https://app.oxfordabstracts.com/stages/1230/submitter

PLEASE ALSO NOTE:

The conference team is aiming to have the conference as a live event in which participants attend the conference in person. The team is aware of the possible challenges of travel in June 2022 and is willing to discuss remote participation in cases where the travelling is hindered. Unfortunately, we are unable to offer the whole conference as an online event / in a hybrid format.

Call for papers (new submissions)

IABA World Turku 2022
Life-Writing: Imagining the Past, Present and Future
14-17 June 2022
Turku, Finland

SELMA: Centre for the Study of Storytelling, Experientiality and Memory warmly welcomes proposals to the 12th IABA World Conference, which will be held at the University of Turku (Finland), June 14-17, 2022. Through the theme of Life-Writing: Imagining the Past, Present and Future, IABA World 2022 will explore the multiple temporalities shaping the dimensions of life storying and life writing research. Temporality impacts the writing and shaping of life narratives, as well as the ways in which we analyze life narrative documents. The temporal is at the core of how we understand the centuries-long histories of how the self is written about and the genealogy of life writing research. Temporality, however, does not mean only gazing to the past, but also understanding how the present moment and orientation to the future are visible in life writing and/or how history makes its presence known in different moments and spaces. The temporal approach also invites us to explore how the future is imagined in life narratives and to discuss our visions for the future of life writing studies.

This interdisciplinary conference encourages dialogues across boundaries of theory, methodology, genre, place, and time. The Conference invites not only traditional conference papers and panels, but also unconventional presentation formats, creative sessions, as well as artistic performances. We encourage cross-disciplinary and transnational contributions. Proposed works may consider life storying through themes including for example:

  • Narrating and imagining life courses (for example childhood, youth, and aging in life writing)
  • Ethics of storytelling
  • Cultural memory and societal change
  • Non-human life storying / Life writing in posthumanism
  • Autobiography, diary, letters, and life writing in historical research
  • The histories and futures of different genres of life writing
  • Digital history and the future of biographical and prosopographical research
  • Sensory and/or Emotive narratives
  • Life storying in popular culture (music, film, theatre, games)
  • Visual life narratives (photography, graphics, visual arts etc.)
  • Hidden/forgotten lives vs. Public/celebrated lives
  • Interrelations: Family and life writing
  • Life storying migrations, displacements, and belongings
  • Life writing illness and wellness / disability and ability
  • Imagining futures in life narratives
  • Life writing and artistic research
  • The histories and futures of life writing studies across disciplinary boundaries
  • Methods, genres, and definitions in life-writing/autobiographical/life story/ego-document research

Submissions:

We invite both 20 minute individual presentations and 90 minute full panel, roundtable, or workshop sessions. We encourage proposed full sessions to be interdisciplinary and international. Creative sessions and performances can also be proposed and if you are uncertain about how to submit these, please contact the organizers: iabaturku2020@utu.fi

The conference language is English.

All presenters must submit a max. 300 word abstract and a 150 word bio.

Please note: when you propose a full session all the presenters must submit their own abstract to the system and mention that it is part of XXX session.

Abstract submission guidelines:

  • Register to Oxford Abstracts to submit
  • You may amend your submission until the final submission deadline. Please note that uncompleted abstracts will not be reviewed.
  • Remember to complete the abstract and answer all the required questions before the deadline.
  • If you have any questions regarding the submission process, please contact info@aboaservices.fi
  • Oxford Abstracts: https://app.oxfordabstracts.com/stages/1230/submitter

Practicalities and schedule:

Deadline for new proposals 30 November 2021
Notification of acceptance: by 22 December 2021

Deadline for confirming and modifying the submissions that are already in the OA system 30 Nov 2021

Registration (re)opens: 20 December 2021

Early bird fee until: 15 March 2022

Final registration by: 

30 April 2022 – abstract presenters
15 May 2022 – regular participants

The Conference Fees:

Participant type
Early bird fees
Late fees

Participant
270 EUR
320 EUR

Participant (reduced fee, dinner not included)
220 EUR
270 EUR

Student participant
220 EUR
270 EUR

Student participant (reduced fee, dinner not included)
170 EUR
220 EUR

Information about publication plans:

The conference team will publish a special issue of Biography in conjunction with the 2022 IABA Turku. More information on this during the conference.

Conference organizer: SELMA: Centre for the Study of Storytelling, Experientiality and Memory, University of Turku

Conference co-organizers:  Åbo Akademi University, the City of Turku, International Institute for Popular Culture, and the Finnish Literature Society

FAQ:

Individual proposal + panel: traditional academic session with 3–4 participants, 20 min presentation + 10 minutes discussion. In full panel, we propose that the chair is one of the presenters.

Roundtable: 4–6 participants, with short presentations and then questions from the round-table organizers, dialogue between participants and then open discussion from the floor

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What’s New? Topical Work in Transnational Life Writing 
Sixth Annual Symposium organized by Unhinging the National Framework: Platform for the Study of Transnational Life Writing 
 
Friday, 3 December 2021, 9.30 – 17.00
Campus Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
Atrium, Medical Faculty
Van der Boechorststraat 7 (first floor)
 
Free of charge, but please register before Tuesday, 30 November 2021: b.boter@vu.nl
 
 
Speakers
Conny Braam, former Dutch anti-apartheid activist; writer of biographies, historical novels, travelogues, short stories. Interview about her recent work on Hendrik Witbooi (2016) and Jakob Witbooi (2020).
Interviewer: Dr. Barbara Henkes, Groningen University
 
Hermine Haman, PhD-candidate Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam: “Reconstructing the life and work of Eddy Bruma, Surinamese lawyer, author, politician”
Response: Dr. Lonneke Geerlings, independent researcher
 
Dr. Margriet van der Heijden, physicist, journalist and author of Denken is verrukkelijk: Het leven van Tatiana Afanassjewa en Paul Ehrenfest (2021): “A vibrant household and cosmopolitan oasis in ‘rainy’ Leiden”
Response: Dr. Abel Streefland, Delft University of Technology
 
Prof. dr. Kees Ribbens, NIOD, Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies: “Selling the Dutch WWII narrative abroad. Mapping the transnational republication of war stories”
Response: Dr. Marijke Huisman, Utrecht University
 
Prof. dr. Ugur Üngör, NIOD, Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies: “The Syria Oral History Project: A Transnational Perspective”
Response: Dr. Ernestine Hoegen, independent researcher
 
Dr. Suze Zijlstra, independent researcher, author of De Voormoeders: Een verborgen Nederlands-Indische Familiegeschiedenis (2021): “Raising Eurasian children under Dutch rule in eighteenth-century Makassar”
Response: Dr. Eveline Buchheim, NIOD, Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies
 
 
Research pitch
Four Dutch queens in a time of nation building (1774-1934)
 
Dr. Alpita de Jong, independent researcher, biographer of Wilhelmina van Pruisen (1774-1837)
Dr. Petra van Langen, independent researcher, biographer of Anna Paulowna (1795-1865)
Dr. Leonieke Vermeer, Groningen University, biographer of Sophie van Wurtemberg (1818-1877)
Dr. Monica Soeting, independent researcher, biographer of Emma van Waldeck-Pyrmont (1858-1934)
 
 
Bookstand
Utrecht-based bookshop Savannah Bay

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The Hazel Rowley Literary Fellowship, valued at $20,000, supports Australian writers working on biography projects.

Deadline for Applications, Nov. 16, 2021

The Fellowship is open to Australian citizens and permanent residents. Up to $20,000 is awarded for travel and research to further a writing proposal or work in progress. It may not be used to pay for a research assistant or to subsidise a publication.

The focus is on biography, but extends to an aspect of cultural or social history compatible with Hazel’s interest areas. Preference is given to projects that are about ‘risk-taking’ and expanding horizons, promote discussion of ideas, and make a significant contribution to public intellectual life.

Applications open each year on 1 October and close on 16 November, the shortlist is announced in the following January and the Fellowship is awarded in March. For more information and to make an application, visit Writers Victoria.

Previous applicants are eligible to apply again. If submitting a second application for the same project, any progress should be reflected in the proposal. The judges will take into account any progress that has been made.

Click here for the Fellowship Terms and Conditions.

COVID-19 changes

The Hazel Rowley Fellowship recognises the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on writers’ ability to undertake travel and research. Accordingly, we have extended the time frames for the 2022 Fellowship to 18 months and priority will be given to those projects that do not involve international travel.

The Fellowship was established by the family and friends of Hazel Rowley, one of the world’s leading biographers, to commemorate her life and writing legacy following her death in 2011. Hazel left behind a legacy of great writing, a passion for words and for exploring the lives of exceptional men and women.
Following her award-winning biography of the Australian novelist Christina Stead in 1993 Hazel went on to establish an international career with a biography of the African-American novelist Richard Wright (2001), an examination of the relationship of the French philosophers Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre, Tête-à-Tête (2005) and her last book, an insight into the marriage of the Roosevelts, Franklin and Eleanor: An Extraordinary Marriage (2010).
Although most recognised for these four outstanding biographies, Hazel also wrote and published many essays, articles and book reviews. She was well known as a lively and engaging public speaker, appearing at numerous book festivals and literary events around the world.
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  • CFP: Popular Culture Association Annual Conference-Biographies Area (11/15/2021; 4/13-16/2022) Seattle, USA
Biography, Film and Film History, Journalism and Media Studies, Music and Music History, Popular Culture Studies

The Popular Culture Association will be holding its annual conference in Seattle, Washington, April 13-16, 2022.

The Biographies Area is soliciting papers that examine the connections between biography and popular culture. Papers and full panel presentations regarding any aspect of popular culture and biography are encouraged. Potential topics might include:

– Biography and entertainment, art, music, theater
– Biography and film
– Biography and criminal justice
– Television programs about biography
– Biography and urban legends
– Biography and folklore
– Biography and literature
– Scholarly Biography
– Controversial Biography
– Psychoanalysis and Biography
– Historical Biography
– Political Biography
– Autobiography

Sessions are scheduled in 1½ hour slots, typically with four papers or speakers per standard session.  Presentations should not exceed 20 minutes.

On your submission, please include title of paper, abstract, and contact information.

Submission Deadline: 11/15/21

Please go to this link to submit your paper:

 https://pcaaca.org/conference/submitting-paper-proposal-pca-conference 

Contact Info:

Susie Skarl
Associate Professor/Urban Affairs Librarian
UNLV Libraries
4505 S. Maryland Pkway
Las Vegas, NV 89154

Contact Email:
FULL PAPERS: 15 February 2022
ABSTRACTS: 15 November 2021

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Special Issue: Life Writing & Persona

2022 Vol. 8 Issue 1 Persona Studies

Call For Papers:

Persona Studies is seeking papers and creative projects that investigate the ways in which personas are produced, managed, used, and disseminated in the contexts of life writing. We take “life writing” here in the very broadest of senses to include written texts (published and unpublished; written, print and online) but also other forms and genres of representation/self-(re)presentation including film, art, theatre, publicity, social media and more.
In this issue we are interested in life writing as a site of persona production, persona performance, and persona dissemination. Whether vlogs and Facebook posts or celebrity memoirs, profiles or biopics, life writing texts are doing persona work – often quite intentionally and strategically in the cases of public figures and public texts. Indeed, life writing seems both an obvious and natural home for studying persona and there are productive sites of overlap in how these fields theorize performativity, authenticity, strategy, agency, and reputation.
But the study of life writing as a site of persona work also has the opportunity to stretch both fields in new directions: private life writing texts, for example, offer a challenge to the supposition in Persona Studies that personas are mechanisms for being public. Persona Studies in turn complicates distinctions between public and private mechanisms of self-(re)presentation that have historically structured Life Writing Studies. Theoretically, both fields have much to offer each other: how might theoretical work on the slash in auto/biography, truth-telling, and auto/biographical pacts be brought to bear on persona performances? How might life writing benefit from thinking about playability, mediatization, and role-playing?
This special issue on life writing and persona welcomes abstracts and papers related to these and many other issues including (but certainly not limited to):
·       Social media and other forms of presentational media as sites of persona work and life writing
·       Persona and biographical representational media forms: films, profiles, biographies, etc.
·       Self-presentation in representational media forms
·       Persona in public and private life writing texts
·       Referentiality and truth-telling in persona work
·       Issues of agency, performativity, and reputation in life writing
·       Strategic productions of persona in life writing
·       Personas in the publicity and marketing of life writing texts

Abstracts and Expressions of Interest (300-500 words) should be submitted by 15 November 2021 to katja.lee@wa.edu.au with the subject heading “Life Writing and Persona.” Full papers may also be submitted at this time.
Notification of acceptance will follow by 1 December 2021. Please note that final acceptance of the full paper and project is contingent upon the peer review process.
Full papers (6,000-8,000 words) and creative projects will be due 15 February 2022.

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Call for Papers 

EXPERIMENTAL LIFEWRITING  

22-23 April 2022, Wrocław, Poland
University of Wrocław and École Normale Supérieure de Lyon 

Conference website: http://vanessaguignery.fr/

The capacious category of lifewriting accommodates conventional biography and autobiography – with their insistence on linearity, coherence and a stable sense of the self – as well as auto/biographical works that embrace digital media, mix genres and break down neat life narratives into fragments. In order to give a name to the disruptive strand of the auto/biographical tradition, Irene Kacandes has proposed the term “experimental lifewriting,” which encompasses texts employing an unconventional formal device “for the purposes of fact or of enhancing, reinforcing or drawing attention to the referential level.” They are driven by the desire “to convey some aspect of the ‘realness’ of certain life experiences that could not be conveyed as well without pushing at the form itself.” Kacandes distinguishes between experiments regarding time, medium, the relation between the author, subject and reader, and the work’s focus. Julia Novak goes on to define “experiments in lifewriting” as works that “push at the boundaries of existing forms to mould them into something that better suits the writer’s efforts of representation.” In her co-edited volume (with Lucia Boldrini) Experiments in LifeWriting (2017), she suggests an alternative classification, based on experimentation with the auto/biographical subject, generic composites, style, structure, intertextuality and metalepsis, names and pronouns, and media. 1975 – the year of the publication of Roland Barthes by Roland Barthes and Joe Brainard’s I Remember – can be viewed as the onset of that overtly experimental streak in auto/biographical writing, which has recently yielded such diverse works as David Clark’s 88 Constellations for Wittgenstein (2008), Joan Wickersham’s The Suicide Index (2008), Anne Carson’s NOX (2010), Maggie Nelson’s The Argonauts (2015), Una’s Becoming Unbecoming (2015) and Carmen Maria Machado’s In the Dream House (2019). However, as Max Saunders has argued, that tradition can be traced back to the Modernist practice of autobiografiction and claim such literary classics as Virginia Woolf’s Orlando (1928) and Gertrude Stein’s The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas (1933).

Our conference aims to theorize, historicize, and exemplify the still very fresh critical notion of experimental lifewriting. We have a particular interest in contemporary Anglophone writing and welcome comparative papers about works in English and other languages. Possible issues and forms to explore in conference papers include (but are not limited to):

  • fragmentary lifewriting,
  • genre-defying graphic memoirs,
  • multimodal, multimedia and collage-like lifewriting,
  • digital/online biography,
  • conceptual (life-)writing,
  • postmodern lifewriting and avant-garde autobiography,
  • anti-biography,
  • fake auto/biography,
  • the self as archive/database,
  • digital identities and the quantified self,
  • auto/biography and social media,
  • formal experimentation in the context of trauma, grief and/or radical vulnerability,
  • queer lifewriting,
  • autobiography in the second or third person,
  • generic hybridity in lifewriting,
  • unconventional relations between the author, narrator, subject and reader,
  • playing with frames/framing,
  • pedagogical implications of experimental lifewriting.

Proposals (ca. 300 words), together with a biographical note, should be sent to Vanessa Guignery (vanessa.guignery@ens-lyon.fr) and Wojciech Drąg (moontauk@gmail.com) by 15 November 2021.

Keynote speakers: Irene Kacandes, Teresa Bruś and David Clark.

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Call for Papers

Disability at the Intersection of History, Culture, Religion, Gender, and Health

Date: March 3-4, 2022

Place: Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI

 Submissions Due Oct. 31, 2021

Disability is a living human experience. It is not merely a medical or biological phenomenon, and it is not only the subject of sciences. Perspectives on disability have evolved historically, theologically, and medically. Academics and disability activists have increasingly come to view disability as more than an individual medical diagnosis, often highlighting it as an issue of social justice and equity. As such, there is a need for further collaboration between the sciences and the humanities to deepen our understanding of disability in all of its complexities. Using interdisciplinary approaches to examine disability as fluid and dynamic condition can help us understand it as an identity and as social construct.

This conference aims to encourage open discussion and better understanding as well as to breakdown stigma associated with disabilities. To accomplish that, the conference aims to generate inclusive dialogues and interdisciplinary interactions between academia, community organizers, social and legal activists, health care service/providers, and religious leaders. The conference will serve as a platform to foster collaboration between various groups engaged in understanding and improving disability conditions.

We invite papers that offer critical analysis of how disabilities have been viewed in historical terms as medical conditions, social/cultural constructs, and as the norms that produce and reproduce perceptions of normalcy or normative bodies. We particularly welcome papers dealing with normalcy narratives, discourse, and issues of stigmas evolving around disabilities in marginalized communities with an emphasis on the intersection of disability (as an identity and minority) with gender, culture, and religion.

Key Topics:

Core conference themes include, but are not limited to:

Disability and identity

Social and cultural construction of disabilities

Religious and cultural perspectives on disability

Bodies and construction of normalcy

Gendered disabilities and feminist approaches to disability

Language terminology and conceptualization of impairment and disability in literary, cultural, and artistic production

Disabilities as social and legal rights issue

Community activism, policy making, and service

Lived experiences, life-writing and narratives of people with disability

This hybrid conference will host both in-person and virtual sessions. We invite proposals of individual papers, panels, workshops, roundtables, and thematic conversation. Graduate student submissions are encouraged. Panels will be composed of 3- 4 presenters (time must be divided equally among panel presenters allowing 10-15 minutes for questions). Roundtable and thematic conversation may consist of more than three participants. The time for all panel types is one hour.

Keynote Speaker: Lennard Davis, Distinguished Professor, Disability and Human Development, The University of Illinois Chicago

Key Dates:

Abstracts up to 300 words in Word format must be submitted through the electronic system by October 31, 2021.

You will be notified of the decision by December 15, 2021.

Publication

Conference proceedings and selected papers will be published in a special issue of the Journal of Gender, Ethnic, and Cross-Cultural Studies.

Preliminary organizing committee members:

Enaya Othman

Tara Baillargeon

Behnam Ghasemzadeh

Michelle Medeiros

Giordana Poggioli-Kaftan

Dana Fritz

Gülnur Demirci

Stefan Reutter

Submit your abstract at https://epublications.marquette.edu/icdi/2022/

For any inquiries, please contact

Dr. Enaya Othman at enaya.othman@marquette.edu

Gülnur Demirci at ggulnurdemirci@gmail.com

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Announcement: Call-for-Papers:
This call has been slightly revised.
This call is for abstract submissions for an international edited collection now entitled Taking Control: the use of critical and creative digital tools in the now and beyond, in  screen, literature, graphic texts, and visual culture narratives.
Currently I am seeking a number of academics and professionals in the field who might like to send me an abstract for consideration for inclusion in the book.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the deadline date for abstracts has been extended:
Abstracts now due: 19  October 2021.
The aim of Taking Control is to highlight the human-AI blend in creativity as a vibrant multidisciplinary thematic area where we urgently need better understanding and clear parameters to judge success and failure.
Taking Control seeks to examine the current uses, and the potential for expansion and extension, and possible future uses of AI in relation to screen and literature, including e-books and electronic literature genres and graphic texts, and visual culture narratives; as well as the little explored angle of cultural criticism and cultural meaning in those human-AI assisted productions.
Suggestions for potential contributions to consider, but not limited to, are, how the use of AI in these productions may:

  • connect to the viewer’s/reader’s world to foster a new reality and encourage learning;
  • sharpen, and ask for answers to, big questions that intersect with our society and environment and worlds;
  • encourage further research that opens new possibilities as well as an open-mindedness in the quest for a deeper understanding;
  • create platforms that cross cultures and borders, to become inter- and multi- disciplinary;
  • provide immediate access to resources that we can trust to provide accurate information, and that is enriching and productive;
  • bring to the table a common “language” that can create a shared experience, with the potential to cross borders into other disciplines, and sustain our cultural heritage;
  • discuss how the human-AI blend can be used to highlight or determine the use of cultural criticism and/or cultural meaning in the relevant productions;
  • discuss the potential of the human-AI blend for extension and expansion, and possible future uses in the stated genres.

Technology can be misused, yet in the human-AI blend humans have the power to intervene. In these interactions, there is the potential to take things to a different level. The power of the human, the ability to think differently, and critically and creatively, together with the technical abilities of the immediate computer for holding, sorting, and providing masses of big data, hold out the possibility of expanded human creativity. When you choose and use information fairly, it makes the outcome compelling and accurate. AI affects what people look for; what they enter, and how they respond, and what that reveals and changes about the people, can affect our societies and cultures. Wherever you add questions about our environment, for instance, AI it sharpens it so we can relate to it.  Thus, how it relates to the human experience, to our world, and human society, much depends on how we manage it, where we take it and what we do with it.

Questions remain: In what ways can human-AI assisted screen, literature, graphic texts  and visual culture narratives expand, grow, and bring deeper understanding of ourselves, our worlds, our environment, our culture and society, and bring about change?  How do these works address cultural criticism, and social and cultural meanings, and add to our understanding of our cultures and society? What is the potential for exploring human experience and that connect to our world, and the possible import of these productions for the future? Admittedly, there are differing views and opinions on the future of AI. Some think an Artificial General Intelligence  can exist and others think not. What does all this mean for our future society and culture?
At this initial stage, in lieu of “chapters,” this proposed work, Taking Control, calls for extended abstracts for consideration for inclusion in the book.
Submission instructions:

  1. The extended abstracts must be more than 1,000 and less than 1,500 words.

(Full-length chapters of 6,000 – 7,000words each (including notes but excluding references lists, title of work, and key words) will be solicited from these abstracts.)

  1. Please keep in mind that your essay-chapter will be written from your extended abstract. Your abstract will carry the same title as your essay-chapter.
  2. To be considered, abstracts must be written in English, and submitted as a Word document.
  3. When writing your abstract use Times New Roman point 12,and 1.15 spacing.
  4. At the beginning of your extended abstract, immediately after the title of your work and your name, add 5 to 8 keywords that best relate to your work.
  5. Use the Chicago Manual of Style 16th Edition.
  6. Use English spelling not American English spelling.
  7. Use endnotes, not footnotes, use counting numbers not Roman numerals, and keep the endnotes to a bare minimum, working the information into the text where possible.
  8. Do cite all your work in your extended abstract as you would in a full chapter.

a) in the body of the abstract, add parenthetical in-text citations (family name of author and year, and page number/s) (e.g. Smith 2019, 230);
b) fully reference all in-text citations in alphabetical order, in the References list at the end of your abstract.
10. Please send your abstract and your documents as attachments to an email. At the same time as
submitting your extended abstract, in separate documents please send the following:

  • Your covering letter, giving your academic title/s, affiliation, your position, and your home and telephone, and email contact details;
  • A short bio of no more than 200 words;
  • Your C.V., giving your publications to date, and the publishing details and dates.

Papers should be forwarded to:
Jo Parnell Jo.Parnell@newcastle.edu.au  alternatively annette.parnell@newcastle.edu.au  or joandbobparnell@bigpond.com
Dr Jo Parnell. | Honorary Associate Lecturer
School of Humanities and Social Science
College of Human and Social Futures
M: +61 (0)421 993 253
E: Jo.Parnell@newcastle.edu.au
W: newcastle.edu.au/profile/Jo-Parnell
International author and editor
Latest books:
Representation of the Mother-in-Law in literature, film, drama, and television (Lexington Books USA, 2018).
New and Experimental Approaches to Writing Lives (Macmillan International Higher Education, Red Globe Press, 2019).
The Bride in the Cultural Imagination: Screen, Stage, and Literary Productions (Lexington Books USA, 2020).
Taking Control: the critical and creative uses of digital tools in the now, the foreseeable future, and beyond, in screen, literature, and the visual arts. culture (Palgrave Macmillan, forthcoming 2021/22).
Writing Australian History on Screen: cultural, sociological, and historical depths in television and film period dramas “down under,” with Julie Anne Taddeo (Lexington Books, USA, forthcoming 2021/22).
Cultural Representations of the Second Wife: Literature, Stage, and Screen (Lexington Books, USA, forthcoming 2021/22).
The University of Newcastle
University Drive, Callaghan NSW 2308 Australia

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Journal Articles for Special Issue: “Teaching Girlhood Studies

deadline for submissions:
October 15, 2021
Girlhood Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal

Girlhood Studies, as an academic discipline, is still growing. Since some educational institutions do include girls’ studies as part of a special curriculum, an academic program, a certificate course, a minor, or as part of Women’s Studies or Gender Studies, Girlhood Studies does have a presence in academia although at this stage rarely in an autonomous department. This interest in the pedagogies and practices of teaching Girlhood Studies is an important aspect of its growth as a field of study at university level, at school, and outside of formal academic settings.

Depending on these formal and informal educational contexts, the discussion of approaches to teaching girlhood can range from theoretical ones to outlining hands-on projects that invite and promote the discussion of girlhood so, for this special issue, we invite articles that address the teaching of Girlhood Studies in various contexts. The key questions that inform this special issue build on those that informed the creation of this journal: “What is girlhood studies”? How do we do girlhood studies? What is the relationship between women’s studies and girlhood studies? What is the relationship between girlhood studies and boyhood and masculinity studies?” (Mitchell et al. 2008: ix).

Contributors might like to explore the following questions:

• Why teach Girlhood Studies?

• Are there girlhood pedagogies?

• Are girlhood pedagogies also feminist pedagogies?

• Are we working with girls as equal participants in teaching and learning Girlhood Studies?

• What is the status of teaching Girlhood Studies and in which new directions should it go?

• How has the landscape of teaching Girlhood Studies changed?

• Who teaches Girlhood Studies?

• Who are students in Girlhood Studies courses? Whose voices are highlighted or whose are silenced?

Articles may address teaching girlhood studies from various perspectives and academic disciplines including historical studies, literature, cultural studies, media studies, the study of juvenilia art, material and virtual culture (for example toys and games), girls and science, geographies of girlhood, education, and girl methodologies and methods, among others. Articles may present case studies or empirical research, may include or focus on artistic representations, or may be about theoretical or conceptual frameworks related to girlhood pedagogies. Teacher perspectives as well those of students are welcome. In addition to conventional articles, we will also consider creative contributions and material produced by (former or current) students of Girlhood Studies courses. We are especially interested in contributions on teaching Girlhood Studies by and about Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC).

Abstracts are due by 15 October 2021 and should be sent to teachinggirlhoodstudies@gmail.com

Full manuscripts are due by 15 March 2022. Authors should provide a cover page giving brief biographical details (up to 100 words), institutional affiliation(s) and full contact information, including an email address.

For more information, please see https://journals.berghahnbooks.com/_uploads/ghs/GHS_cfp_TeachingGirlhood…

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“Ecce mulier”: Female celebrity culture and the visual arts around 1900

Call for papers Image and Narrative 24.2 (2023)

Guest edited by Carlijn Cober, dr. Floris Meens and dr. Tom Sintobin, this issue will focus on representations and self-representations of female key figures during the fin de siècle of the 19th century. By combining visual, narrative and historiographical analyses, we aim to gain insight into how female artists, authors, actors, musicians, salonnières, scholars and muses both functioned within the cultural field and have been ‘imagined’ or imagined themselves during their lifetime and beyond.

Research questions can concern either literal or figurative interpretations of terms relating to both ‘image’ and ‘narrative’. In the case of literal visual imaginations, possible questions would be: How are female figures depicted in visual media, such as photographs, films, paintings, sketches, or cartoons? Against which background, in what posture, in whose company? Does that depiction follow, establish or transgress norms? How – through what media and in which circles – were these images established, distributed or consumed, both synchronically and diachronically? What was the relationship between various forms of representations and the women’s fame? Who was responsible for these depictions: did women have agency and to what extent can they be seen as a coproduction?

In the case of figural forms of imagination, questions could be: How did famous or influential women construct or fashion their own image? How are they visible in literary texts, poetry, diary entries, biographies, letter exchanges, plays, operas, operettas and songs? What role did they play within the cultural imagination? How have they been imagined, within which framework, in what role or position, in relation to whom? How have either their image or narrative evolved over time, during their life or ours? How can we render them visible or highlight different perspectives of them?

We are looking for articles with an average length of 5000 words (including notes and bibliography) that together address a wide range of methods and approaches related to this topic, and original interpretations of both ‘image’ and ‘narrative’. Those interested to contribute can submit an abstract of maximum 250 words and a cv to eccemulier.cfp@gmail.com by October 1st, 2021. The deadline for the first drafts will be March 1st, 2022 the final deadline July 1st, 2022.

Contact Email:

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Deadline for Submissions 9/30/2021

2022 Magarey Medal for Biography Applications Open

The Magarey Medal for Biography is awarded biennially to the female person who has published the work judged to be the best biographical writing on an Australian subject. The 2022 Medal will be awarded for a book published in 2020 or 2021. For the 2022 round, the Magarey Medal will be administered by the Association for the Study of Australian Literature (ASAL).

Intentions to submit an application are due 30 September 2021 and applications close 31 January 2022.

Details here: https://theaha.org.au/awards-and-prizes/magarey-medal-for-biography/

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New Developments in 20th- and 21st-century Life Writing

(9/30/2021; 3/10-13/2022) Baltimore, USA

contact email:

New Developments in 20th- and 21st-century Life Writing (Panel for NEMLA conference, March 10-13, 2022, Baltimore MD)

Forms and approaches to self-representation continue to diversify as the landscape of possible media, tools, subjects, and cultural accounts is growing. Historically, life writing genres such as biography, autobiography, memoir, correspondence and ancestral documentation have been used as archival, political and sociological resources. However, the value and use of life writing extends far beyond these textual forms and practical uses. In an increasingly mobile and interconnected world, issues of subjectivity, identity, belonging, self-constitution and dialog become more pressing, particularly in response to social and cultural upheaval. Examples include Walter Kempowski’s so-called collective diary Echolot or Katja Petrowskaja’s autofictional family history Vielleicht Esther.

The panel looks at voices and perspectives that have gained new traction in recent decades. In particular, we invite papers that consider genre developments within Life Writing with an eye towards methods, forms and interpretations that broaden the range of voices and subject positions we explore. While significant research regarding Life Writing has been undertaken within the field of German Studies in recent years, we also welcome proposals from other disciplines and fields.

Please submit a 250-300 word proposal through the NeMLA submission portal by September 30, 2021: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/19545
If you have any questions regarding the panel, please contact the organizers:
Friederike Eigler (eiglerf@georgetown.edu) and Samantha Grayck (scg86@georgetown.edu).

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Ethics of Witnessing

NeMLA (9/30/2021 3/10-13/2022 Baltimore USA
contact email:

In the aftermath of mass atrocities, where the humanity is both the subject and object of a destructive process, the historical truth is almost impossible to access. On the one hand, perpetrators have tendency to deny their responsibility in committing atrocities, and on the other hand, victims’ experience remains unspeakable due to the impact of trauma. After the Holocaust, researchers from different disciplines focused on the possibility of transmission of the traumatic events related to the atrocities, as well as the obstacles that are faced during this process. One of the interesting areas of research in this regard is the victim-perpetrator encounter and the dynamics of witnessing in relation to the historical truth. This panel investigates the dynamics of witnessing and its representations through the artistic production.

Deadline for submissions–9/30/2021.

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Rock Music Icons

deadline for submissions:
September 30, 2021
full name / name of organization:
For the Record

Well-developed essays on major rock music artists are sought for publication in the For the Record book series. These essays should extend beyond biography into some aspects of the artist’s creative work. Of particular interest are essays on rock performers who have made an impact since 1980 and essays that discuss the artist’s music, iconic status, and cultural significance. Of course, essays on Elton John, David Bowie, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, and other major figures who made their mark before 1980 are also welcome.

Proposals of about 200-300 words may be sent from July through September 30, 2021 and should indicate the direction of your essay. Essay proposals and inquiries may be sent to Dr. Robert Mc Parland at bmcparland@bobmcparland.com or mcparlandr@felician.edu

Complete essays of 5,000-6,500 words will be due by the end of 2021.

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Legacies of Trauma: The Tragedy of Before and After
deadline for submissions:
September 30, 2021

Language, Literature, and Interdisciplinary Studies
contact email:
llids.journal@gmail.com

CALL FOR PAPERS For a Special issue Of Language, Literature, and Interdisciplinary Studies

Legacies of Trauma: The Tragedy of Before and After

In the last couple of decades, life-writing has come to be seen as a singular site of reclaiming unclaimed experiences of trauma. Despite the apparent crisis of representation, a wide array of strategies and innovations are employed in life-writings towards the cause of conveying trauma. Life-writing in its various avatars dealing with trauma foreground the insight that trauma is not only a “drama of past event, but also, even primarily, a drama of survival” (Rubin). For the autobiographical subject, modalities of articulation and testimony present grounds for recovery of selfhood, leading to a possibility of re-engagement with the lifeworld. In putting together the fragments of memory, life-writing potentially counters trauma through the enactment of witnessing one’s own trauma in telling and its transmissibility to the reader, through whom the questions of secondary victimhood come to be seen as another determinant in the complex signification towards the experience of trauma. However, language miserably gives way to its own splintering before the overwhelming traumatic experience and fails to remain a witness thereof. Nevertheless, across different genres of expression, including digital and hybrid ones, dilatation of conventional idiom of expression with a view to register creatively what resists or slips away is crucial.
Subjects living as survivors of life-threatening events take to different means of expression. The complexity of textualizing trauma is such that the narrative oftentimes betrays a great deal about how the subject re-constitutes itself to come to terms with the experience, thereby underlining themes of truth telling and reconciliation in the face of trauma. However, one of the complex threads of survivor’s narrative is the interpellation of memory in the act of composing a narrative. It also brings to fore an aporia inherent in the very enterprise of representing trauma that is typically taken as unrepresentable. Delayed response to trauma, fragmented memory, complexity of experience, denial, and fear of persecution dislocate the subject from its history, culture, and context.
This call for paper stems out of the realization that there is much to be reckoned with in the experience and imprint of traumatic experiences in life, which seem to be hinged to the tenor of (our) times. Representations of trauma abound in photography, cinema, paintings, memoirs, testimonials, etc., giving a spectrum of positions to engage and tease interdisciplinary lines of inquiry.
Scholars are invited to explore the area by engaging and going beyond the following thematics:

  • Partition Literature/Literature of Crisis and Trauma
  • Restorative Function of Art
  • Tropes/Metaphors and Articulation of Trauma
  • Modernity and Trauma
  • Memory Studies and Trauma
  • Disability Studies and Trauma
  • Trauma in Pre-modern Life-writing
  • Life-writing and Childhood Trauma
  • Construction of the Childhood/Figure of Child in the Survivor’s Narrative
  • Intergenerational/Transgenerational Trauma
  • Historical Trauma and Methods of Recuperation
  • Testimonial Projects and Legal Framework
  • Limits of Representation in Autobiography
  • PTSD in Non-Western Narratives
  • Construction of Trauma and Politics of Trauma
  • Pathography and Limits of Autobiography
  • Trauma and Scriptotherapy
  • Trauma and Public Memory
  • Pandemic and Trauma
  • Exile and Trauma
  • Refugee Crisis and Trauma
  • Representation of Trauma through Photographs

Submissions:
Only complete papers will be considered for publication. The papers need to be submitted according to the guidelines of the MLA 8th edition. You are welcome to submit full length papers (3,500–10,000 words) along with a 150 words abstract and list of keywords. Please read the submission guidelines before making the submission – https://ellids.com/author-guidelines/submission-guidelines/. Please feel free to email any queries to – editors@ellids.com.
Submission deadline: 30th September, 2021
Website – https://ellids.com/
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/journal.llids/

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NEMLA 2022: Family Inheritance in Original Creative Work (9/30/2021; 3/10-13/2022) Baltimore, USA

Writers inherit much from their families: stories, material wealth, trauma, discipline, genetic traits, knowledge, and other legacies. What do we do with this heritage and how do we make it our own in our original creative productions? Will the legacy become a heirloom seed that produces exquisite blooms or a hereditary disorder that wilts inspiration on the vine? Bestselling memoirists Mary Karr, Sherman Alexie, Ocean Vuong, and many others have famously shaped family trauma into achingly poignant works of art, begging us to ask if such pain is a necessary ingredient of their success. On the other hand, poets such as Robert Hayden and Ruth Stone have eulogized family members through art, thereby immortalizing the positive aspects loved ones have left behind.

This panel will explore these positive and negative inheritances through readings of creative works followed by a panel discussion. Writers are invited to interpret the theme of inheritance broadly, to read a 10 to 15-minute excerpt of the poetry fiction, or creative non-fiction (including memoir) that showcases their inheritance, and participate in a discussion of how writers make use of what their families leave them. Please submit a 200-250-word abstract of your presentation, including how it applies to the theme of inheritance, and a two-page excerpt of the creative work you will read.  Submit to https://www.cfplist.com/ by September 30, 2021.

Contact Info:

Dr. Betina Entzminger

English Department

Bloomsburg University

bentzmin@bloomu.edu

Contact Email:

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#MeToo and Contemporary Literary Studies (NeMLA panel)

deadline for submissions:
September 30, 2021
Mary K. Holland and Heather Hewett, SUNY New Paltz
contact email:

#MeToo and Contemporary Literary Studies: panel accepted for the 2022 NeMLA conference (March 10-13, 2022; Baltimore, MD)

While feminist literary scholars have been examining the relationship between literature and rape for decades, the #MeToo movement has reenergized this work. Building on recent scholarship (Serisier 2018; Field 2020; Holland and Hewett 2021), and along with forthcoming work (Gilmore; Hobbs), this panel considers the range of critical frameworks with which literary critics are addressing gender, identity, violence, and power. Reassessing these aspects of experience and representation in light of this movement calls for a rethinking of the critical practices we use to produce scholarship and theory about literature and culture, and requires rereadings of literature and authors whose participation in or critique of rape culture has yet to be made visible, or whose work can be revisited to shed light on the current moment.

The panel is particularly interested in transnational, transcultural, and intersectional approaches that attend to genre and genre-blurring; publication and reception; rape culture outside and inside academia; the interconnections between written literature and social media; narratives about sexual violence, racism, and colonialism authored by BIPOC authors; queer violence and survivorship; and the recent outpouring of published literature, particularly memoir and lifewriting, about sexual violence, testimony, trauma, and healing. Most broadly, this panel will ask how current theoretical and critical approaches are positioned in the long history of literary activism against sexual violence, and what role literature and literary studies can play in the project of ending sexual violence and rape culture.

More specific topics include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Rethinking critical practices in light of #MeToo.
    • Ways in which intersectional analyses of #MeToo narratives might provide another context for interpreting creative work, particularly texts that explore bodily violence, trauma, and survivorship;
    • How #MeToo, and social media more broadly, interacts with traditionally published life narratives and changes the possibilities of creating, sharing, and using personal narratives;
    • Ways in which sexual politics in the university or publishing world inhibit critical work that unmasks misogyny and sexual abuse;
    • Ways in which critics might silence themselves when writing about misogynistic texts or texts that support rape culture;
    • Implications of authorial accusations of sexual abuse for critical readings of authors’ work (eg, Junot Diaz, Sherman Alexie).
    • Reconsiderations of canonical authors whose sexual politics have so far escaped scrutiny (eg, Coetzee, Updike; this list may include female authors);
    • Readings of lesser known texts that critique rape culture in effective ways;
    • How young adult literature treats sexual assault and rape culture (Erik Cleveland and Sybil Durand published on this topic in 2014);
    • How sexual assault is normalized even in otherwise female-empowering literature, film, or TV;
    • How depictions of sexual assault and rape culture in contemporary texts differ from those in earlier texts, because of changes in the law, cultural changes, political movements, etc;
    • Texts that draw parallels with the current political and social climate of backlash against women’s rights.Feminist rereadings of authors or specific texts whose misogyny, rape culture, and/or scenes of sexual harassment, abuse, or rape have yet to be identified and critiqued by critics.

Please submit your abstract using the NeMLA conference portal: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/19291

NeMLA 2022 – Representing Care and Being Together in Refugee Writing (9/30/2021; 3/10-13/2022) NEMLA, Baltimore USA

Please consider submitting an abstract for the following panel at the 2022 Northeast Modern Language Association Conference to be held from March 10-13, 2022, in Baltimore, MD. Abstracts are accepted from June 15 to September 30, 2021.

Submit abstracts at the NeMLA portal: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/login

This panel invites papers that attend to new perspectives on the representation of refugee histories and experiences in literature. The figure of the refugee has been the subject of much political and philosophical debate, ranging from discussions about the “bare life” of the refugee (Agamben 1995) to their being subjects of humanitarian violence (Nyers 2006). More recent investigations in literary studies have focused on the misrepresentation or absence of refugee histories in post/colonialism, diaspora studies and modernity such as with David Farrier’s Postcolonial Asylum: Seeking Sanctuary Before the Law, Lyndsey Stoneridge’s Placeless People: Writing, Refugees and Rights and Daniel Coleman’s et al. Countering DisplacementThe Creativity and Resilience of Indigenous and Refugee-ed Peoples. More can be said, however, about the representation of refugee experiences and histories of care, desire, and aspiration in literature. What experiences other than violence and trauma remain to be elucidated in refugee writing? How is refugee writing envisioning alternative ways of caring and being together?

Paper topics include but are not limited to:

  • Representations of refugees in graphic novels and memoirs
  • Refugee memoirs and testimonials
  • Refugees in film and television
  • Collaborative writing projects
  • Experiences and histories of refuge or asylum in opera and musical theatre

If you have any questions, please contact Jonathan Nash (Universisty of Victoria) at jnash33@uvic.ca

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CFP: Biographies as “Probes” of Transformation? ‘Agency’ of Nazi Perpetrators after 1945 in the Federal Republic, the GDR and Austria

Workshop at the University of Vienna, 03-04 March 2022

The workshop focuses on political biographies of perpetrators of National Socialism after 1945, with a regional emphasis on West Germany, the GDR and Austria.

Research on Nazi perpetrators published in recent years has increasingly concentrated on the definition of the concept of perpetration, on the identity and agency of Nazi perpetrators, and on the conditions for their participation in the crimes. In doing so, however, the “prehistory” during the German Empire, World War I, the Weimar Republic, and the First Republic was incorporated into the political biographies of the perpetrators. Further activities of the perpetrators after the end of the “Third Reich” are only mentioned as the aftermath of National Socialism, in the “politics of the past”, and are rarely interpreted as the prehistory of post-National Socialist societies.

Moreover, transformation processes around the macro-historical caesura of 1945 are primarily analyzed from a structuralist perspective. Studies on this topic tend to focus on the examination of (federal) ministries, using the year 1945 as a marker of collapse and new beginning (which is also constituted in the biographies), and thus, contribute to the construction of a dichotomy of continuity and breaks. The individual perspectives of the biographical subjects, however, hardly become visible.

Adopting Thomas Etzemüller’s approach of viewing biographies as instruments or “probes” (“Sonden”), into an integrated social history “in order to understand the functioning of society”, we will consider and examine – on the basis the biographies of female and male perpetrators in National socialism – society and the individual not as separate entities, but as constituents involved in a reciprocal relationship. In this context, we will discuss and question in the workshop the dichotomy of macro- and micro-perspectives as well as the concepts of “structure” and “agency”.

Workshop papers may address, but are not limited to the following questions:

– Perpetration: How did individual perpetrators deal with their participation in Nazi crimes? How is their participation integrated into the narrative of their own biography? Did they hide, legitimise, or deny their participation? What strategies did they use?

– Careers and networks: How did perpetrators react to system collapses and changes? Who succeeded in integrating into new systems and who did not? Which agents were able to use their qualifications and “expertise” acquired under National Socialism and how? How did system changes influence private and professional networks and functional elites?

– Integration: How did former Nazi perpetrators integrate into new systems? How did integration possibilities differ for perpetrators, especially with regard to elites? Where did integration succeed, where did it fail?

– Structure: The conditions and norms of post-National Socialist societies influenced and confronted the perpetrators first in the occupation zones, later in Austria, the GDR and FRG. How did the developing societal structures, constitutional systems, and norms influence the perpetrators’ decisions to act?

– Legality and illegality: Who fled? Who maintained their legal existence and who entered illegality? What can be determined about the relationship between actual and feared prosecution and how did this influence the actions of the perpetrators? How did (feared) prosecution affect (dis)integration processes?

Application: We particularly encourage doctoral students in history and related disciplines to apply. Proposals should include an abstract describing the topic, relevance, empirical basis, and methodological approach of your paper, as well as a short CV of the applicant. Please send your proposal, which must not exceed two pages, as one PDF file to taeterbiografien.ifz@univie.ac.at by 30 September 2021. Conference languages are German and English. Travel and accommodation costs can be reimbursed to a limited extent.

Contact Info:

taeterbiografien.ifz@univie.ac.at

Oliver Gaida / Kathrin Janzen / Stefan Jehne / Yves Müller


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Deadline for Submissions 9/15/2021

Announcement: Call-for-Papers

This slightly revised call is for abstracts for a scholarly, international edited collection entitled, Cultural Representations of the Second Wife: Literature, Stage, and Screen.
Currently I am seeking a number of academics and professionals in the field who might like to send me an abstract for consideration for inclusion in the book.

Due to effects of the covid-19 pandemic 2020-21, and the strain this has placed on people and businesses (including academics and universities world-wide), the deadline for abstracts for this project has been extended.
New deadline for abstract submissions: 15 September 2021

The aim of this scholarly edited collection is to reveal how the personal expectations and actual experiences of the second wife may differ from the social and cultural expectations and realities of the role of the second wife; and how the second wife may be perceived in the popular and social culture of various cultures, in screen, stage, and literary productions and pop culture narratives.

In any culture, religious and cultural beliefs are inseparable, and intrinsic one to the other, and are important to the marriage  customs and laws of that particular culture or society.
Regardless of whether a culture is mainly monogamous or polygamous, one female figure that attracts attention is the second wife. A woman may become the “second wife” either by fact or by custom, or by religious law, or by de facto relationship, or by concubinage. In most though not necessarily all cultures, and according to the religious and cultural beliefs and laws of a culture, as well as the civil laws of that country, a man who has been but is no longer married may remarry; and in some cultures also, a man who is currently married may marry or take a second wife who may or may not have been formerly married to some different man. In some other cultures, cultural customs, or religious dictates, or accepted practices, or inheritance factors, forbid men who are divorcees or widowers to remarry. Similarly, and perhaps more so than with men, some cultures forbid widows or divorced or abandoned women from remarrying.

It is generally understood that whether she is welcomed by her new in-law family, or not, the first wife as a new wife, brings with her some baggage into the new relationship, into the life of the man she weds, and hence into the family into which she marries, and ultimately into that society; but perhaps this is more so in the case of the second wife.  From antiquity to the present, like the first wife, the second wife features in stories, anecdotes, and jokes, and in both high and low culture, but in a way that is vastly different to how the first wife is depicted. The concept of the second wife is an important part of social and cultural history and ritual in most societies, world-wide, yet it would seem that to date, there are no published scholarly edited collections, no academic books, on representations of the second wife from the angle suggested in this cfp.

In can be said that in any culture, the role of the second wife may differ to that of a first wife. The act of becoming and the experience of being a second wife may also be somewhat different to that of being a man’s first wife. Questions arise: within any culture, regardless of her status as a woman, what are the implications for a woman who marries a widower or divorced man? Likewise, what are the implications for a second wife in a polygamous relationship?

Some suggestions for potential contributors to consider, and that could be addressed, may include but are not limited to are:

  • What are the cultural and social duties of the second wife; what are the cultural expectations of her; and what are her personal realities and expectations, as represented in the popular culture of a particular culture/society? Is it possible to detect differences or sameness between the fictionalized portrayals and the realities and social dictates of that culture?
  • How do class, ethnicity, culture, race, gender, and possibly history, shape representations of the second wife, as indicated in the popular screen, stage, and literary productions of any one particular culture?
  • What is the range of ways in which the second wifeis represented in the popular/social culture of the various societies?
  • Are there any powerful cultural or socially historical antecedents for the representation of the second wife in popular/social culture, as screen, stage, and literary productions?
  • What are the creators and/or the producers intentions behindtheir portrayals of the second wife; what are the messages or lessons they intend for their audiences through these depictions?
  • How would we establish the underlying cultural, historical, or production motivations for particular depictions of the second wife?

How often, if at all, are these representations told from the point-of-view of the second wife herself?

  • Is there a difference between the ways in which the second wife is represented in cinematic film to that in small screen, and between those mediums to representations in drama, and to literature? Or in these representations, is there a reasonably broad consensus between these genres?

This collection of scholarly essays will make an intervention in the field: it will be the first of its kind to make a comprehensive study of what being a second wife means to and for the woman, the family, the community, the culture, and the society to which she belongs; to explore whether or not there are characteristic features of the second wife between cultures that may have either some similarity, or that are totally dissimilar, in popular belief and popular culture; to document and record how various eastern and western societies perceive and represent the socially and culturally important figure of the second wife in screen, stage, and literary works and pop culture narratives; to indicate if there is agreement or difference between the various cultures on how the figure of the second wife is represented in popular culture to the viewing/reading audiences; to establish a new and dynamic area of theoretical research crossing family studies, women’s studies, cultural studies, social history, gender studies, social studies, and the humanities in general; to point the way to possible future cross-disciplinary work through examining various peoples and societies by way of cultural representations of the second wife; and to permit scholarly consideration of the extent to which the creators and producers of narratives about the second wife place this figure on the perimeter of society or at its center.

Submission instructions:

At this initial stage, in lieu of “chapters,” this proposed work, Cultural Representations of the Second Wife, calls for extended abstracts for consideration for inclusion in the book.

  1. The extended abstracts must be more than 1,000 and less than 1,500 words.

Full-length chapters of 6,000 – 7,000words each (including notes but excluding references lists, title of work, and key words) will be solicited from these abstracts.

  1. Please keep in mind that your essay-chapter will be written from your extended abstract. Your abstract will carry the same title as your essay-chapter.
  2. To be considered, an abstract must be written in English, and submitted as a Word document.
  3. When writing your abstract use Times New Roman point 12,and 1.15 spacing.
  4. At the beginning of your extended abstract, immediately after the title of your work and your name, add 5 to 8 keywords that best relate to your work.
  5. Use the Chicago Manual of Style 16th Edition.
  6. Since this work is intended for Lexington Books, USA, please use American (US) spelling not English (UK) spelling, and not Australian English spelling;
  7. Use the Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary;
  8. Use endnotes and not footnotes, use counting numbers not Roman numerals, and keep the endnotes to a bare minimum, working the information into the text where possible;
  9. Do cite all your work in your extended abstract as you would in a full chapter:

a) in the body of the abstract, add parenthetical in-text citations (family name of author and year, and page number/s) (e.g. Smith 2019, 230);

b) fully reference all in-text citations in detail and in alphabetical order, in the References list at the end of your abstract;

  1. Please send your abstract as a Word document attached to an email;
  2. To this same email please also attach, as separate Word documents, the following:
  • Your covering letter, giving your academic title/s, affiliation, your position, and your home and telephone numbers, your home address, and your email contact details;
  • A short bio of no more than 250 words;
  • Your C.V., including a full list of your publications and giving the publishing details and dates, and including those in press, and published.

Editor: Dr Jo Parnell, PhD, Researcher and Honorary Associate Lecturer, School of Humanities and Social Science, College of Human and Social Futures, University of Newcastle, Australia.
Papers should be forwarded to:
Jo Parnell at: Jo.Parnell@newcastle.edu.au  or annette.parnell@newcastle.edu.au or joandbobparnell@bigpond.com

Dr Jo Parnell. | Honorary Associate Lecturer
School of Humanities and Social Science
College of Human and Social Futures
M: +61 (0)421 993 253
E: Jo.Parnell@newcastle.edu.au
W: newcastle.edu.au/profile/Jo-Parnell
International author and editor
Latest books:
Representation of the Mother-in-Law in literature, film, drama, and television (Lexington Books USA, 2018).
New and Experimental Approaches to Writing Lives (Macmillan International Higher Education, Red Globe Press, 2019).
The Bride in the Cultural Imagination: Screen, Stage, and Literary Productions (Lexington Books USA, 2020).
Taking Control: the critical and creative uses of digital tools in the now, the foreseeable future, and beyond, in screen, literature, and the visual arts. culture (Palgrave Macmillan, forthcoming 2021/22).
Writing Australian History on Screen: cultural, sociological, and historical depths in television and film period dramas “down under,” with Julie Anne Taddeo (Lexington Books, USA, forthcoming 2021/22).
Cultural Representations of the Second Wife: Literature, Stage, and Screen (Lexington Books, USA, forthcoming 2021/22).
The University of Newcastle
University Drive, Callaghan NSW 2308 Australia

Life Narrative Futures: 

An International Auto/Biography Association (IABA) networking event for graduate students and early-career researchers

Sponsored by the IABA SNS, and the IABA regional chapters

Friday 29th October, 2021 (Australian CST)

Call for Expressions of Interest

Dear colleagues,

On behalf of the IABA Americas, Asia-Pacific, and Europe chapter convenors, I am pleased to announce this on-line networking event aimed at linking graduate students and Early-Career-Researchers (ECRs) across the globe who are working on life narrative projects. 

In their special issue of a/b: Auto/Biography Studies “What’s Next? The Futures of Auto/Biography Studies” (2017) Ricia Anne Chansky and Emily Hipchen aimed to give “established and emerging scholars from multiple disciplines the time and space to enter into lively discourse on our possible futures.” The result was an incredibly timely multivocal, interdisciplinary conversation about where we are heading as a discipline. 

Such conversations seem even more important now. 2020/2021 have been especially challenging periods for graduate students and ECRs. Travel restrictions have affected networking opportunities, and IABA would like to acknowledge this by organising this event aimed at supporting and celebrating emerging scholars.

Format: Via Zoom conferencing, graduate students/ECRs will be placed in small groups and will make short, informal presentations about their projects. Each group will also contain an established IABA scholar who will act as a mentor in offering feedback on the projects in their small group.

The event will be held virtually in an ‘around the world’ format with the aim of accommodating different time zones in an inclusive way.

To participate in this event, please make a submission of approximately one page as a Word doc including the following information:

  • Your name;

  • University, Department/Faculty affiliation;
  • 50-word bio;

  • Thesis or current project title;

  • Short abstract for your project;

  • Two-three challenges emerging from your research project/topic;

  • Questions /issues you would like to discuss with your fellow graduate students/ECRs.

The extended deadline for submissions in September 10, 2021. Please make your submission to: iaba.asiapacific@flinders.edu.au

Any questions, or for more information, please contact the organizers: 

iaba.asiapacific@flinders.edu.au

Kind Regards, Kate Douglas (Flinders University, Australia), on behalf of the IABA regional chapters and IABA SNS.

International Auto/Biography Association Worldwide

https://sites.google.com/ualberta.ca/iaba/home

IABA Student and New Scholar Network (SNS)

https://iabasns.wordpress.com; on Facebook: facebook.com/IABASNS

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Call for Digital Submissions Proposals – Ongoing

a/b: Auto/Biography Studies is building a YouTube channel dedicated to highlighting and extending the journal’s content, upcoming book releases, and projects and conversations related to life narrative and identity studies more broadly.
We’re hoping that you’ll help us expand our online content and/or contribute to building a digital archive by submitting proposals for contributions to our new YouTube channel. We can support content in any language and are able to provide translation, transcription, and closed captioning services.
Possible Topic Ideas include:
· Trailers promoting upcoming book releases, special issues of journals, conferences, CFPs, and other happenings;
· Interviews between scholars at any stage in their careers or between scholars and life narrators, especially as pertinent to publications, conferences, and other activities;
· Oral histories of the field;
· Image-driven or other multimodal research relevant to life narrative; and
· Issues that intersect with life narrative, especially those that relate to social justice and human rights.
Have an idea? We’d love to hear it! Submit your proposals—300-500-words—in .pdf format to Jessica Lauer and Orly Lael Netzer at [abstudiesdigital@gmail.com]. Be sure to include your name, affiliation, email address, and a short bio with your proposal.
Don’t have an idea, but would still like to participate? No worries! While we’re glad to consider all submissions, we also have a wish list of projects that we’d like to undertake. If you’re willing to take on a topic from our wish list related to journal content or a publication in the Routledge Auto/Biography Studies book series, we’d be delighted to work with you.
Queries may be directed to the Digital Content Editors, Jessica Lauer and Orly Lael Netzer at [abstudiesdigital@gmail.com].
Thank you for being a part of our digital future!
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International Symposium | Digital Expressions of the Self

National Institute of Technology Silchar / University of Hyderabad / Goldsmiths University of London

Concept Note

This symposium engages with the digital forms of expressions of the self. It explores the ways in which, for instance, digital techniques now allow the construction of selves that often rely more on algorithms than any ‘original’ referent. Consider, for example, how algorithms simulate images, voices etc. and have become the basis for facial-biometric recognition, and similar datafication concerning the self. This shift is indicative of what we might term posthuman condition. Along these lines, we are interested in papers that engage with how expressions enhanced by algorithms produce multiple, fractured selves. Following Deleuze, we invite papers that engage with how the in-dividual has become ‘dividual’ in societies of post-control vis-a-vis the introduction of digital technologies. Finally we are interested in how people experiment with creative expressions of the self. ​Constructing the self in the digital sphere may involve processes of experimentation that in turn allow one to experience the self in multiple ways. This is mediated of course by the apparatus of the digital-codes and algorithms. Digital self-expression occurs both consciously and explicitly, and subconsciously and indirectly. Taking this as a point of departure, this symposium examines the broad range of digital expressions of the self.

Panel 1: Affect, Fandom and Liveness in Popular Culture, 8 Sep, 2:40–3:45 P.M. (Indian Time)

1)Live Performance and the Media: A Methodological Reflection on Analysing Stand-up Comedy in India — Madhavi Shivaprasad, Advanced Centre for Women’s Studies, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai, India

2) Yo Yo Matlab Aapka Apna : Locating Affect and Gender in Online Fandom of Yo Yo Honey Singh — Prashastika Sharma, Ambedkar University, Delhi,  India

3) Digital Expression from the Shadow States: The in-betweeners in the Late-capitalist Era — Sagorika Singha, The Sarai Programme, Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, Delhi, India

Panel 2: The Self and/as Subject, 8 Sep, 4:45–6:00 P.M. (Indian Time)

1) Defining Our Google Self: Our Self Perception Meets The Platform Society — Oshri Bar-Gil,
The Program for Hermeneutics and Cultural Studies, Bar-Ilan University, Tel Aviv,  Israel

2) A New Normal: Social Media, Vanishing Cultural Values and the Digitalisation of Pregnancy among Nigerian  Women — Henrietta Eshalomi, Institute of African Studies, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria

3) The Reality of the Internet and Its Effect on the Individual — Simran Tapaswi, Student, IIT Gandhinagar, Gandhinagar, India

Panel 3: Being Seen, Being Social, 9 Sep, 2:40–3:45 P.M. (Indian Time)

1) “Why do Indians Cry Passionately on Insta?”: Grief Performativity and Ecologies of Commerce of ‘Crying Videos’ — Soma Basu, Faculty of Information Technology and Communication Sciences, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland

2) Instagram and Ambiguities of Female Sexual Imagery — Cheshta Arora, National Institute of Advanced Studies, Bengaluru, India

3) (Re)Imagining the Khasi tribe on social media — Rajani K Chhetri, Department of Mass Communication, Assam Don Bosco University, Guwahati, Assam, India

Panel 4: The Performative and the Political, 9 Sep, 4:45–6:00 P.M. (Indian Time)

1) No Politics on My Island: Animal Crossing and Politics of Digital Self-expression in China — Lin Song
Department of Communication, University of Macau

2) “Revolution Will Not Happen on Facebook… but Propaganda can”: Political Practices, Strategies and Communities in Web 2.0 — Akansha Tyagi [1] & Abhishek Kumar [2]
[1] Department of Sociology, University of Mumbai, Mumbai, India; [2] Department of Humanities and Social Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, India

3) “Azadi’s Political until You’re Pressing Play”: Digital Platforms and Hip-hop in India — Debarun Sarkar
Department of Sociology, University of Mumbai, India

Closing panel: Exploring identity and selfhood in digital spaces

Keynote

1) Prof Ayona Datta, University College London (4:00 – 4:30 P.M. IST, 8th Septemper, 2021)

2) Dr Nimmi Rangaswamy, IIIT-Hyderabad (4:00 – 4:30 P.M. IST, 9th Septemper, 2021

Register using this link: https://tinyurl.com/DigitalExpressions

You can find the Book of Abstracts here: https://tinyurl.com/DEBookofAbstracts

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Dear colleagues and friends, 

You are invited to the Emotional Culture and Society seminar “New Forms of Self-Narration one year on: A conversation on young women’s life narratives” on Wednesday 8 September from 9:30 to 11:00 CET. If you are in Pamplona, you are welcome to join us in room M05 in Edificio Amigos

You can also join us online via Zoom: https://unav.zoom.us/j/96186125471?pwd=RHYyY1B6a1l6SUQ3YkdObndOd0dUQT09

Author Ana Belén Martínez García will be discussing her book along with Dr. Kate Douglas from Flinders University. Roundtable chaired by Dr. Rosalía Baena.

About the book: 

This book is a timely study of young women’s life writing as a form of human rights activism. It focuses on six young women who suffered human rights violations when they were girls and have gone on to become activists through life writing: Malala Yousafzai, Hyeonseo Lee, Yeonmi Park, Bana Alabed, Nujeen Mustafa, and Nadia Murad. Their ongoing life-writing projects diverge to some extent, but all share several notable features: they claim a testimonial collective voice, they deploy rights discourse, they excite humanitarian emotions, they link up their context-bound plight with bigger social justice causes, and they use English as their vehicle of self-expression and self-construction. This strategic use of English is of vital importance, as it has brought them together as icons in the public sphere. New Forms of Self-Narration is the first ever attempt to explore all these activists’ life-writing texts side by side, encompassing both the written and the audiovisual material, online and offline, and taking all texts as belonging to a unique, single, though multifaceted, project.

We hope you can join us.
All the best,
Ana
Ana Belén Martínez García
Associate Professor of English

ISSA School of Applied Management

Amigos Building, Office 5090
31009 Pamplona – Spain
Tel. +34 948425600 (802814)

New Forms of Self-Narration

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Deadline for Submissions September 6, 2021

Finding Meaning: Oral History, Power and Emotions

21-22 April 2022, Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour, Pau – France

The history of emotions is one of the most notable progressions in the field of history in the last few decades, and in recent years an astonishing number of articles and books has focused specifically on emotions in history. With this “emotional turn” (Boddice, 2018: 72), historians have determined that emotions change over time, and are thus a subject deserving of historical inquiry. Perhaps more importantly, emotions are at the center of human experience and therefore at the center of our history: “human emotions are neither timeless nor universal, but rather shaped by historical and cultural circumstances” (Thomson, 2019: 1). Emotions are both the effect and active cause of historical events. In addition, as argued by Boddice, focusing on emotions enables “to rehabilitate the unsaid – the gestural, affective and experiential – of traditional historical narratives” (Boddice, 2019: 10). He even proposes to refer to various labels – such as “feelings” and “affective experiences” – so as to open possibilities for the expression and interpretation of emotions (14).

Feelings have also been the focus of oral historians for many decades before this historical turn towards emotions. The key findings of oral historians are not so much the events that narrators recall, but the “meanings and feelings” relating to those events, in line with Alessandro Portelli’s argument that it is the subjectivity of oral history interviews that constitutes an invaluable contribution to the field, as it allows the researcher to analyze how the interviewee gives meaning to personal experience; this, in turn, is indicative of the collective construction of meaning (Portelli, 1981: 96-107). Accordingly, the primary aim of this conference is to explore the relevance and possibilities of finding meaning in oral history interviews. The conference organizers wish to explore oral history’s potential to record, interpret and make sense of emotions in historical experiences in the Americas, the United Kingdom and Ireland, but also across global geographical and cultural areas. The narrative element becomes key to the understanding of these meanings, which cannot be revealed by any other type of source. The plot, the way narrators choose to organize their story, and shifts in the pace of the narration, as, for example, when only a few words are devoted to talking about experiences which lasted a long time, or the exact opposite, can unveil the subjectivity of human experience. Paying careful attention to language, particularly language used to express feelings and emotions can also help researchers to go beyond the constraints of internalized cultural boundaries, which shape memory (Anderson and Jack, 1991: 11-26). Feelings and emotions can give meaning to activities and events, as for example when certain emotions are silenced because they do not sit nicely with the prevailing collective narrative of a certain event.

The purpose of this conference is to re-center the role of oral history in the history of emotions on the one hand, as well as the role of emotions in history and oral history on the other. Indeed, oral history offers the unique possibility to study the way in which experiences are remembered as well as the relationship between individual and collective memory. “Individual remembering is affected by cultural narratives about the past” (Thomson, 2019: 2) and emotions are essential in this process because they are “impacted by social relations and cultural expectations” (Thomson, 2019: 2). Joanna Bourke focused on fear and anxiety in an article published in 2003 (Bourke, 2003: 111-133), in which she argued that humans narrate their emotions by conforming to certain narrative structures. Bourke shed light on the dialogical nature of the link between the personal emotion and the collective emotional environment of a society. This paves the way for further studies on the shifts in the way people narrate certain emotions and the subsequent ways in which these shifts may also alter their subjective experience.

The other facet of the study of emotions that the conference organizers wish to explore is its relationship with power which, despite its complexity, has yet to be fully problematized. Bourke writes: “emotions such as fear do not only belong to individuals or social groups: they mediate between the individual and the social. They are about power relations” (Bourke, 2003: 124). Fear – and emotions more generally – are the product of a society and of given “power relations”, but they may also contribute to reforming them, as shown by the history of the evolving status of women or minorities in society. More precisely, are emotions experienced differently because of one’s gender and/or one’s identity, as suggested by Boddice (2018: 100-122)?

It may also be argued that emotions can be empowering: in the context of war and conflict for example, oral testimonies indicate strong interrelations between affective experiences and agency. The organizers of the conference also wish to assess the extent to which oral history as a methodology is empowering when it gives agency to participants who have traditionally been excluded from more classic approaches to historical research. Paradoxically, emotions may also be indicative of situations of domination and subordination, and of a person’s powerlessness.

From a methodological perspective, how could historical analysis enhance the narratives which include expressions of feelings and emotions? Alistair Thomson offers some insight into this in his most recent work on emotions in oral history (Thomson, 2019: 1-11). The sound of personal testimony can further our understanding of the emotions and their historical and cultural meanings. Speakers can add emphasis by increasing volume, or adding well-timed pauses; excitement and emotion can be shown by a change in the speed of the speech, whereas slowing down might express difficult moments. Silences are widely studied by oral historians, as they often mean painful moments, a struggle with the narrator’s own memory, or even embarrassment or shame. Thomson writes: “the voice can suggest warmth and pleasure, anger and disappointment, sarcasm or disapproval” (4), and how would one interpret the meanings of laughter, sobs or tears?

Furthermore, the organizers propose to include both the interviewing process and analysis carried out by the same researcher as well as the so-called “secondary analysis”, or the analysis of pre-recorded interviews which have been (or are about to be) deposited in sound archives around the world by someone else. This practice of reusing past interviews is somewhat controversial and frowned upon on the basis that an oral history interview is not a “data-bank”, offering empirically neutral material that anyone at any moment in time can draw upon. This attitude has been referred to as the “naive realism” of the researcher, with the argument that interview data are “socially constructed”, and are not “simply facts that are free of theoretical presuppositions” (Bornat, 2010: 43-52). Yet, following Joanna Bornat’s argument in favor of the practice of revisiting past interviews, the organizers of the conference would also like to explore the possibilities for historical research offered by the exploitation of the many hundreds of hours of recorded interviews held in sound archives, some of which are even available on line. The underlying ambition will be to identify a scientific framework in which such a research method could become an interesting (re)source and could eventually open up new research prospects.

The themes to be investigated include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • The relations between emotions, history and oral history

Emotions as cultural, social, political and/or historical constructs

The role of emotions in the construction of memory; “memory composure”

The meanings and feelings of human experience

Emotions and historical experience

  • Historicizing emotions
  • Emotions and causation
  • Emotions, empowerment and activism; emotions and power relations (domination, subordination)
  • Emotions in the context of war and conflict
  • Emotions and gender
  • Emotions, racial and ethnic issues

Proposals seeking to explore methodological issues will be welcome, such as:

  • The advantages and drawbacks of reusing past interviews / interviews conducted by someone else; Methodological approaches to secondary analysis
  • Methods for finding and interpreting emotions; Interpreting silence / what is not said

The organizers will welcome proposals from specialists in History, Oral History, Geography, Civilisation Studies, Social Sciences, Political Sciences, Law and Transitional Justice. The geographical scope will include – but will not be limited to – the Americas, the United Kingdom and Ireland, and proposals taking a comparative and interdisciplinary approach will be particularly welcome. The proposals should preferably focus on the 20th and 21st centuries.

This international, cross-disciplinary conference will be held in English and French.

Please send a 300-word abstract in English or in French to Joana Etchart and Simona Tobia : joana.etchart@univ-pau.fr and stobia@univ-pau.fr bSeptember 6th 2021

The acceptance or rejection of proposals will be announced in October 2021

Contact Info:

Simona Tobia – s.tobia@univ-pau.fr

Joana Etchart – joana.etchart@univ-pau.fr

Contact Email:
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Deadline for Submissions September 1, 2021

Request from the editor of Markers: Annual Journal of the Association for Gravestone Studies

We are currently seeking article submissions for the 2022 issue of Markers, the scholarly journal of the Association for Gravestone Studies.

The subject matter of Markers is defined as the analytical study of gravemarkers, monuments, tombs, and cemeteries of all types and encompassing all historical periods and geographical regions. Markers is of interest to scholars in anthropology, historical archaeology, art and architectural history, ethnic studies, material culture studies, American studies, folklore and popular culture studies, linguistics, literature, rhetoric, local and regional history, cultural geography, sociology, and related fields. Articles submitted for publication in Markers should be scholarly, analytical, and interpretive, not merely descriptive or entertaining, and should be written in a style appropriate to both a wide academic audience and an audience of interested non-academics.

Authors are encouraged to send a query email outlining a project before sending a manuscript. Queries and submissions to Markers should be sent to Editor Elisabeth Roark, Professor of Art History and Museum Studies at Chatham University, at roark@chatham.edu, before September 1, 2021.

Contact Info:

Elisabeth L. Roark

Professor of Art History and Museum Studies

Chatham University

Pittsburgh, PA 15232

Contact Email:
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Teaching Women Travellers of the Eighteenth Century

deadline for submissions:
September 1, 2021
full name / name of organization:
ABO: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830
contact email:

ABO’s pedagogy series, Concise Collections on Teaching Eighteenth-Century Women,seeks submissions for an article grouping on Teaching Women Travellers in the Eighteenth Century.

This Collection: This collection focuses on the teaching of literary and historical texts, as well as other forms of artistic production, created by and about female travellers in the long eighteenth century. Articles should provide ideas on how a specific text or aspect of the artist/discourse/writer can be taught most effectively and to best impact in different university and college contexts, and thus increase the profile of women travellers in eighteenth-century studies classrooms. Submissions should focus on a strategy for teaching a single text or group of short texts, or will locate an approach or module within the context of a commonly-taught course or framing (in the context of a survey, for example, or course on the novel or theatre, on the sister arts, on gender and sexualities, on travel literatures, on transatlantic/continental dialogues, on studies of empire and colonialism).

The Series: ABO’s Concise Collections pedagogy series seeksto promote the teaching of eighteenth-century women writers and artists who remain underrepresented in university classrooms, beyond a small collection of now-canonical authors. Each issue will have a curated collection of 4-6 articles on teaching the work of a specific woman or group of female creatives, mixing essays focused around teaching individual works with pieces suggesting ways to bring these women into common course topics and syllabi.

“Teaching Charlotte Lennox” will appear in Spring 2022; “Teaching Women Travelers” in Fall 2022; and “Teaching Mary Prince” in Spring 2023. We also welcome submissions on open topics in teaching 18C women, for inclusion in our regular Pedagogies section of the journal.

Submit proposals by September 1 2021 to pedagogy editor tiffany.potter[at]ubc.ca, or complete articles by 15 March 2022 to the ABO platform: https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/cgi/submit.cgi?context=abo

ABO is peer reviewed and indexed in the MLA Bibliography

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Prose Studies Special Issue Call for Papers: “Struggle & Hustle: Queer Nonfiction Prose” (8/13/2021)

Prose Studies: History, Theory, Criticism invites submissions for a special issue devoted to exploring trans and queer mutual aid, support, and networks in all genres and periods of nonfiction prose. This issue seeks to delve into the ways in which trans and queer writers have mobilized nonfiction prose to make visible marginalized identities, disseminate underground knowledge, and fashion networks of care and family.

From Victorian pamphlets on “female husbands” to contemporary web-based grassroots medical guides like Trans Bodies, Trans Selves, trans and queer people have long both been written about and written popular nonfiction prose. Such writing has both served to create fraught narratives of pathology and, often simultaneously, enabled LGBTQIA+ people of diverse lived experiences to reflect their realities and write themselves and their communities into being.

Likewise, in memoirs like Janet Mock’s Redefining Realness and Jacob Tobia’s Sissy, nonfiction prose’s sense of immediacy and materiality works to insist on the self-defined reality of people who challenge conventional notions of the gender, sexuality, gender expression, race, disability, class, geography, size, immigration status, sex work, and to imagine what a thriving self and community can look like.

Moreover, in this context, LGBTQIA+ nonfiction prose must be considered in terms of the material conditions of its production, including queer and trans presses and editors.

Topics of interest might include, but are not limited to:

  • Social and medical advice manuals by, for, and/or about LGBTQIA+ people
  • LGBTQIA+ organizations and their publications
  • Colonial/post-colonial trans and queer identities
  • Writing the self in queer and trans memoir
  • Queer and trans networks in magazines, newspapers, pamphlets, and zines
  • Digital representations and networks of LGBTQIA+ identities
  • Historic and contemporary tensions between “queer” and “trans”
  • Queering and transing prose archives
  • Charting LGBTQIA+ genealogies through nonfiction prose
  • Legal and medical nonfiction prose and LGBTQIA+ people
  • LGBTQIA+ visual culture and nonfiction prose
  • Protest and activist ephemera from ACT UP to Black Lives Matter
  • Pandemic LGBTQIA+ isolation and/or networks of care

About the Journal:

Prose Studies (https://bit.ly/prosestudiesaims) is a peer-reviewed journal devoted to the study of nonfiction prose in all historical and contemporary contexts. The journal is committed to publishing rigorously argued scholarship from diverse theoretical and interpretive approaches.


To Submit:

Please send article proposal abstracts of 500 words to Lisa Hager (hagerl@uwm.edu) by the extended deadline of August 13, 2021. Early submission is welcome as are queries or letters of interest.
Completed manuscripts of 8,000–9,000 words will be due February 1, 2022.

Contact Info:

Lisa Hager

Associate Professor of English & Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies
Director, LGBTQIA Resource Center
Co-Editor, Prose Studies: History, Theory, Criticism

Pronounsthey, them, theirs

University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee at Waukesha
1500 North University Dr.
Waukesha, WI 53188-2720
Office: 129 Westview

hagerl@uwm.edu || http://www.lisahager.net/ || @lmhager

Contact Email:

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Illness Writing in Lebanon: Converging Pathologies and Lived Narratives Since August 4, 2020

This is a call for creative critical personal texts, what Life Writing defines as essays, addressing the cultural ills in the Lebanese context. The solicited essays, unlike conventional academic works, allow for a more creative and self-reflexive approach, and are first-person, lived narratives.

The macro narrative of illness in Lebanon arguably consists of two synergistic categories of illness: first, the deep-seated disease of patriarchy and partisanship and its visceral consequences on economy and environment, which, second, are transposed into a spectrum of somatic and psychological diseases, including cancer, mental ailments, and most recently the widespread traumas of the August 4, 2020 blast. The combined narrative of both types of illness, their converging causes and effects, suggests that the people’s revolution that started in 2019 – later stymied by the pandemic, coeval with the apocalyptic Beirut Port explosion – was the route through which people’s efforts to voice their grievances and seek radical reforms were conjoined.

Knowing that illness writing ties inextricably to its culture of origin, an emerging corpus of Lebanese life writing concomitant with the revolution, pandemic, and Port explosion highlights the causal intersection between the physical and cultural ills that frame these narratives. Illness writing may therefore serve as a means of expressing and drawing attention to, if not also processing, the different facets of illness that currently shape the Lebanese predicament. As illness’s sundry roots (here, patriarchy) and the routes it fosters (here, revolution) are interrogated and celebrated, respectively, such lived stories gain pressing significance. Taking this mode of life writing as its focus, this special issue seeks to explore how writers in the Lebanese context engage with experiences of illness in its various permutations.

Contributors are invited to consider, but are not restricted to, the following themes:

  • The August 4, 2020 explosion and its aftermath
  • Writing the pandemic
  • Negotiating selves, challenging authority
  • Activist texts
  • Queerness and revolution
  • Gender and otherness
  • Bullying
  • (De)stigmatizing illness
  • Coming-of-age
  • Nonviolent micro-aggressions, non-normative behaviors
  • The Syrian refugee crisis
  • Ecological concerns and auto/biography
  • Migrant lives
  • Vicarious trauma and the Lebanese expatriate
  • The elision of sexual minorities from COVID-19 emergency workflows

Submission Instructions

Life Writing publishes both “essays” and “articles.” This special issue will focus upon essays and we particularly invite such submissions. These would be critically informed, creative personal essays, which differ from academic articles in that a high level of analysis and referencing is less important, but the reflexive ‘I’ should filter the subject matter. On the continuum from discursive/analytical to creative, these essays will fall somewhere in the middle. For an example of how this approach might be expressed, see Linus Hagström’s “Becoming a Traitor” (LW 18.1, 2021).

Production Timeline:

Deadline for abstracts (150-250 words): August 20, 2021

Notification of abstract acceptance: September 20, 2021

Essay submissions (3,500-5,500 words, not including notes and references): March 20, 2022

Essay acceptance (pending peer review): June 20, 2022

Revisions and resubmissions: July 20, 2022

Publication: Online first after acceptance, and later in a forthcoming issue of Life Writing.

If you are unsure if the particular form of creative writing that you have in mind would suit this special issue of Life Writing, please contact the guest editor, Dr. Sleiman El Hajj.

Queries, as well as abstract and essay submissions (as WORD documents), should be sent to the following address: sleiman.elhajj@lau.edu.lb. Submissions need to include a brief author bio and e-mail address.

https://think.taylorandfrancis.com/special_issues/illness-writing-lebanon/?utm_source=TFO&utm_medium=cms&utm_campaign=JPG15743

Sleiman El Hajj, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Creative and Journalistic Writing

Departments of English and Communication Arts

Beirut Campus/Lebanese American University

01-786 456 Ext. 1238

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Extended deadline: new deadline for submissions: 31 July 2021 

Life Writing: Transnationalism, Translingualism, Transculturalism

November 20-23, 2021, The University of Adelaide, in collaboration with the University of South Australia and Flinders University.

*please note: this conference can be attended online or in-person.

Website: https://arts.adelaide.edu.au/french-narratives/conference

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:
Prof. Ricia Chansky, University of Puerto Rico,
Prof. Anne Pender, University of Adelaide
Prof. Liu Jialin, Shanghai Jiao Tong University

Transnationalism is an increasingly popular phenomenon, reflecting and responding to the heightened interconnectivity between people and the receding economic and social significance of boundaries among nation states. The current global pandemic has brought issues of interconnectivity sharply into question. In this context, this conference will explore life narratives across a broad variety of contexts.
By discussing life narratives, including in a variety of languages, this conference aims to expand the boundaries of literary studies and its relationships with other media and nations.

Papers may consider themes such as:

  • Narrating and imagining the migrant experience
  • Refugee and asylum seeker narratives
  • Life writing in languages other than English
  • Life writing and translation
  • Translingual and multilingual narratives
  • Coming of Age narratives (especially across nations and media)
  • Childhood life writing
  • Ethics of storytelling
  • Activist narratives
  • Cultural memory across nations, languages and media.
  • Autobiographies, letters and diaries
  • Life narratives in popular culture (music, film, theatre, games)
  • Visual life narratives (photography, graphics, social and digital media, visual arts etc.)
  • The histories and futures of life writing studies across disciplinary boundaries
  • Methods, genres, and definitions in life-writing/autobiographical/life story/ego-document research

Submissions:
The conference will be held in two modes, incorporating face to face and zoom sessions. We invite both 20 minute individual presentations and 90 minute full panel, roundtable, or workshop sessions. We encourage interdisciplinary submissions that foster dialogues across theory, methodology, genre, place, and time. We invite not only traditional conference papers and panels, but also innovative presentation formats and creative sessions.

Please submit a max. 300-word abstract and a 150-word bio to Dr. Christopher Hogarth at iabaadelaide2021@gmail.com by 31 July.

Organising Committee: Professor Natalie Edwards natalie.edwards@adelaide.edu.au, Dr. Christopher Hogarth christopher.hogarth@unisa.edu.au, Dr. Kylie Cardell kylie.cardell@flinders.edu.au, Professor Kate Douglas kate.douglas@flinders.edu.au

IABA Asia-Pacific emerges from the central disciplinary association for auto/biography scholars—The International Auto/Biography Association (IABA). IABA was founded in 1999 as a multidisciplinary network that aims to deepen the cross-cultural understanding of self, identity and experience, and to carry on global dialogues about life writing/narrative. IABA Asia-Pacific aims to foster new region-specific conversations and to encourage regional participation in the global IABA conference. Our goal is to develop scholarly networks between life narrative scholars and practitioners in the Asia-Pacific region that support the circulation and publication of high-quality life narrative theory, practice, and pedagogy.

This conference forms part of an Australian Research Council funded Discovery Project on Transnational Narratives of Migration to Australia (Natalie Edwards and Christopher Hogarth, DP190102863).

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CALLING ALL LIFE WRITERS!

Do you engage in, produce, teach, or write about any of the following?

  • Ethnography or duoethnography
  • Autoethnography or autotheory
  • Biography or educational biography
  • Autobiography or memoir
  • Life history or life narrative
  • Oral history or family history
  • Testimonio
  • Collective biography or prosopography
If so, we warmly invite you to submit a proposal for the
37th Annual Conference of the International Society for Educational Biography (ISEB)
being held in partnership with
The Society of Philosophy and History of Education (SOPHE) Annual Conference
September 30 – October 2, 2021 at the Clayton Plaza Hotel, St. Louis, Missouri

SUBMISSION INFORMATION:
We welcome all those who work with life writing—teachers, graduate students, academics, social workers, and independent scholars—to submit a proposal.  The Conference Program Committee invites presentations in the following formats:

  1. Paper or presentation (individual or co-authored) on completed or in-progress research or methodological approach.
  2. Panel consisting of at least three panel members with related papers or presentations.
  3. Roundtable discussion on an open pedagogical, methodological or research issue.
  4. Structured Posters
To be considered, please complete the Proposal Form and include an abstract of up to 300 words to describe your proposal. The Conference Program Committee will review your proposal and notify you promptly.  Those interested in previous conference information can find it at the ISEB Archive.

CONFERENCE INFORMATION:
Conference Dates:  September 30-October 2, 2021
Location: Clayton Plaza Hotel, St. Louis, MO: http://www.cpclayton.com/
Booking a Room:  When you contact the hotel, please register in the SOPHE room block.
Deadline for Proposals:  July 31, 2021.  Proposals received after this date will only be evaluated if there is room in the program.
Presenter deadline for ISEB registration: September 15th, 2021, after which time you will not appear in the program.

COVID-19 UPDATE:
While we recognize our members are extremely busy in these times, we remind you we welcome paper, panel, round table abstracts, and more.  We fully anticipate that the conference will take place as planned; at the same time, we are monitoring the plans and procedures recommended by the CDC for organizations staging large events and gatherings. The executive team is considering all possible options that will keep our membership safe, including the possibility of virtual sessions.

CONFERENCE REGISTRATION/DATES:
Advanced Registration: August 15, 2021.
Registration Deadline: Only presenters who are current in ISEB membership dues and have paid the conference registration fee will be listed in the Conference Program.
Conference Registration: Members of both organizations will be responsible for paying separate conference registration and organizational membership fees.  Registration will include admission to both ISEB and SOPHE paper presentations, poster sessions, and workshops.
ISEB Membership: In addition to the conference registration fee, presenters must be members of ISEB.  Membership includes a one-year subscription to the ISEB journal Vitae ScholasticaePlease note:  If a presenter wishes to present as part of/at both ISEB and SOPHE, they will need to pay one conference fee, but both membership fees.
Registration Costs:

Registration Advance Late/On Site
Conference Registration + Full ISEB Membership $245 $280
Student Conference Registration + Student ISEB Membership (no journal) $50 $50
Conference Registration + Full ISEB + SOPHE Membership $295 $320
Student Conference Registration + Student ISEB + SOPHE Membership (no journal) $80 $80
Registration link: To register for the conference, please CLICK HERE.

ABOUT THE ORGANIZATIONS:
ISEB is an organization dedicated to the exploration of biography in writing, teaching, research, and other professional endeavors.

SOPHE is an organization dedicated to promote research and teaching in the historical, philosophical, ethical, and social foundations of education.

Please note:  When considering submitting your proposal, SOPHE and ISEB are small but historic organizations that maintain an important space for foundational and biographical scholarship. As the financial pressures and demands in higher education continue to shift, we are working to preserve these important spaces of community and scholarship. Acceptance to our conference means that we are reserving a space for you on the program and organizing the program accordingly. No-shows can have devastating effects for us and for other participants who might have attended in the space we have reserved for you. We ask for you to send early registration if possible and, if accepted, please prioritize your attendance to aid us in our mission of providing a venue for the important work of our members past, present, and future.

JOURNAL:
Participants have the opportunity to submit their papers for consideration for publication in our journal that we have been publishing for near 40 years, Vitae Scholasticae: The Journal of Educational Biography. We welcome all forms of work on life writing scholarship, teaching, and methodology.

QUESTIONS?
For questions or concerns, please contact Dr. Edward Janak, Program Committee Chair, at Edward.Janak@utoledo.edu.  Please reference “ISEB” in the subject line of your email.

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Fans, Fandoms, and Celebrity Studies for NEPCA 2021

deadline for submissions:
August 1, 2021
full name / name of organization:
Northeast Popular Culture Association (NEPCA)
contact email:

The Fan, Fandoms, and Celebrity Studies area encourages submissions that focus on interrogating the ideas and the ideals of fans and fandoms, and why we idolize celebrities. We welcome submissions from all theoretical and philosophical perspectives. We are open to submissions in any area of fan and celebrity studies including but not limited to:

  • Creation and authenticity of fandoms
  • Fandoms, diversity and inclusion
  • Celebrity marketing, advertising, and public relations
  • Social media use and celebrity status
  • Defining fandoms
  • Fandoms and politics
  • Celebrities and illness
  • Sport fandoms and celebrities
  • Issues of fame and what it means to be famous in our culture
  • Fandom comparisons between cultures
  • Trust and value of celebrity
  • An individual celebrity

2021 Northeast Popular Culture Association (NEPCA) will be a virtual conference held between Thursday, October 21-Saturday, October 23, 2021. Please note that proposals are due by August 1, 2021.

Presentations will be limited to 15 or 20 minutes in length depending on the final panel size.

Singular presentations or full panels can be submitted for consideration.  Proposals can be submitted on the NEPCA Conference page or by going directly to the submission form here.

Please select “Fan, Fandoms, and Celebrity Studies” as your designated area.

Please address any questions about submissions to the area chair, Shelly Jones, at jonesmc@delhi.edu

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CALL FOR PAPERS

Life Narratives: Prismatic World of the Author and Beyond, Special Issue of Language, Literature, and Interdisciplinary Studies (7/15/2021) India

The interconnectedness between life and writing, explored in life narratives, subscribes to the axiom of endorsing a transparency regarding the nature of the self who is writing—not only to the readers, but to the author itself who may find a moment of oneness between life and writing. This generates multiple possibilities of interpretation embedded in the questions of truth, memory, and agency of the writing subject. While establishing the subject as the prism of narration, these narratives of subjectivity are punctuated with impulses to understand one’s own life, memorialize one’s experiences, record one’s encounters with the animate and the inanimate, or even a will to preserve the unity of one’s own identity. At the center of life narratives then are located the self-projections of the artist, either underscoring or playing with the apparent unity of author, narrator, and protagonist. But despite this focus on the artist-subject, life narratives keep engaging with epistemological enquiries that often go beyond what the author intends to promote—the act of personal recollection offering unintended consequences despite the concerns being focused upon individuality, subjectivity, interiority, or authenticity associated with the specular figure of the author.

Though overtly committed to personal memory, life narratives also uncover performativity inscribed in the very form, seen as the element of deliberate stylization, that draws attention to the limits of self-expression when structural and creative considerations come into play. Representation of subject, style of writing, or the pattern of self-disclosure gets reflected in plurality of forms that are both sedimented and fluid in structure. These innovative narrative structures are evolved to offer something which is an exception to the normative identification through overlapping of various genres: fiction, non-fiction, autofiction, poetry, memoir, autobiography, digital testimony, etc. Extending well beyond any coherent theoretical coordinates to streamline its disparate forms, life narratives are as much constructed by an individual artist-subject as they are the product of his intersecting textures of historical, social, political, economic, and cultural contexts.

Concerning the Issue 5.1 with the exploration of life narratives in different shapes and formats, LLIDS invites scholars to deliberate upon forms of articulation and presentation of life narratives by either focusing on the themes given below or branching beyond:

  • Forms of Expression and Configuring Autobiographical Subject
  • Ancient, Modern, and Postmodern Life Narratives
  • Narrativizing Memory in Life Narratives
  • Self-Portraits as Life Narratives
  • Life Narratives and Post Truth
  • Life Narratives as Metanarratives
  • Biomythographies
  • Thanatographies
  • Temporality in Life Narratives
  • Gendered Perspective in Self-Representation
  • Confession and Life Narratives
  • Figuring Reader in Life Narratives
  • Experiments with Language in Life Narratives
  • Formation of Identity through Life Narratives
  • Paratextual Elements in Life Narratives
  • Life Narratives in Translation

Submissions:

Only complete papers will be considered for publication. The papers need to be submitted according to the guidelines of the MLA 8th edition. You are welcome to submit full length papers (3,500–10,000 words) along with a 150 words abstract and list of keywords. Please read the submission guidelines before making the submission – http://ellids.com/author-guidelines/
submission-guidelines/
. Please feel free to email any queries to – editors@ellids.com.

Please make all submissions via the form: https://forms.gle/RpiCuga6g4igf2BW7

Submission deadline: 15th July, 2021

Website – http://ellids.com/

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/journal.llids/

Contact Email:

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REMINDER — Call for Contributions

Autobiography, Ethics, and Relations

Proposal deadline: July 15, 2021

Editor: Orly Lael Netzer (PhD), University of Alberta

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier University Press 

The first two decades of the twenty-first century have seen a growing interest in personal stories across media and markets, from photo-journalism, to letters, social media posts, memoirs, documentaries, and performance or installation art. True accounts of experience have been used to protest sexual violence, institutional racism, and neo-colonial practices of occupation; personal stories have been situated as transformative acts of resiliency, healing, survivance, and resurgence; and autobiographical acts have been mobilized to call for humanitarian response to crises of forced displacement and migration. While these interventions are not unprecedented, they highlight two key aspects of auto/biographical acts and their use in contemporary cultures across the globe — namely, the pivotal roles of relationality and ethics.

Contending with auto/biographical ethics means interrogating the relationships and power dynamics that shape individuals’ and communities’ experiences, alongside the relationships embedded in the representation, mediation, and reception of these experiences. In other words, it means accounting for the intrinsic relations between ethics and politics, exploring what truths autobiographical texts speak to while also asking whose lives are represented, how, by whom, for whom, and for whose profit.

Autobiography, Ethics, and Relations — a peer-reviewed edited collection under advance contract with Wilfrid Laurier University Press — will interrogate the ethical challenges, risks, responsibilities, and potentialities embedded in local and global practices of auto/biography.

To explore these issues, I invite contributions attuned to questions of agency, responsibility, and accountability to true stories and to the individuals and communities whose lives have been represented in auto/biographical works across mediums, periods, and locations. The collection as a whole will not offer firm conclusions, nor will it readily solve ethical challenges or dilemmas. Instead, I encourage contributions that speak to wider issues and relationalities (rather than offer an analysis of a single work), offering provocations while carefully situating them in specific cultural, historical and material contexts.

The collection will be organized around three interlinked categories —production, circulation, and reception — and potential discussion topics may address (but are not limited to) one or more of the following:

Production

  • The ethics of telling, discovering, recording, or collaborating to represent lived experience 
  • The power dynamics and ethical concerns embedded in collaborative production of life stories
  • Responsible practices of working with auto/biographical subjects, documents, and communities
  • Producing life stories in/for community settings (e.g. community-based workshops or projects)
  • Reproducing auto/biographical accounts in translation, restoration, or revised editions
  • Considerations of harm, exploitation, access, implication, consent, benefit, and agency of auto/biographical subjects and their communities

Circulation:

  • The ethics of archiving, curating, anthologizing, and promoting true stories
  • The circulation and use of life stories for/ as social justice activism Life stories vis-à-vis human-rights discourse
  • Approaches to life stories in history, ethnography, sociology, archeology, etc.

Reception:

  • The use of life stories in discourses of state/ international recognition and redress
  • The ethics of remembrance, memorializing lives, or commemorating trauma
  • Ethical approaches to reading life writing (privately and publicly)
  • Auto/biographical ethics in discourses of testimony and witnessing
  • Audiences’ responsibilities to true stories and the communities whose experiences are shared

I welcome contributions from emerging or established scholars, artists, writers, curators, or activists, as well as educators, librarians, editors, publishers, and journalists, or archivists. Please send a short abstract (~300 words) and a brief biography (100 words) to Dr. Orly Lael Netzer (laelnetz@ualberta.ca) by July 15, 2021.

Those invited to submit full chapters will be notified by August 15, 2021. Please note the manuscript will undergo a full peer-review process. Complete chapter drafts should be approximately 7,500-9,000 words including endnotes and bibliography and will be due Jan. 30th, 2022. Citations will follow the Chicago 17th Manual of Style (Author/Date style).

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to reach out via email. I look forward to reading your submissions,

Orly

Call for Papers: Unknown stories of intermediaries in women’s migration: men, women and non-binary people (7/10/2021) Edited collection

Editors:

Alexandra Yingst (University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland) Stellamarina Donato (LUMSA University, Rome, Italy)

Call for Papers:

Recent scholarship has promoted gender equality in the field of female migration. Although generally seeking to record stories on the experiences of migrant women, scholars are also working to uncover the lesser-known stories of men, women, and non-binary people who played a part in the migration of women. This collection of essays aims to record the forgotten stories of people who positively or negatively impacted female migration. Stories can be about social network formers/maintainers, migrant smugglers, human traffickers, and more.

We propose an edited collection of stories that show how everyone, no matter what gender they identify as, plays a role and is involved in female migration. Stories may be about people both past and present.

Following Donna Gabaccia’s work on gender in migration studies, we want to stress the importance of including literature on gender studies in this volume. This volume will present a strong theoretical focus with innovative research methods from multiple disciplines across the humanities, social, and political sciences. An example of such literature would be the work of social theorists like Butler, Fraser, and historians like Scott, who focused on gender as a subjective process and not a determinant natural factor. Gender identification is a crucial point to consider when addressing unknown stories of migrant women because it challenges the vulnerability paradigm that has populated the debate for decades (Reysoo & Verschuur, 2004; Grotti et al., 2018) and therefore goes beyond the complementarity between men and women as the status quo (Andaya, 2007; Grami, 2018) and limited male-female comparisons (Donato et al., 2006; Erdal & Pawlak, 2018). In this regard, this collection considers women’s migration and gender equality (O’Neil et al., 2016) as two issues that should always coexist and aims at stressing their ties throughout the essays.

Objectives:

In this edited volume, we will show how all genders (not only women) have importantly been involved in female migration. By studying their social networks and resources that assisted the migration process, we also aim to challenge the widespread belief that migrant women are always vulnerable. Finally, we will challenge the effect of gender constructs found in migration studies (i.e., how migrant issues are often dichotomized).

We also plan to bring together researchers from different disciplines who have a story to tell about the intermediaries, men, women and non-binary identifying people, who directly impacted the personal experiences of migrant women. Each chapter should also refer to those specific themes that are often related to women’s migration, such as stigma, vulnerability, determinism, double standard. Therefore, we would like to collect contributions that have the following elements:

a)  Present a lesser-known story of an intermediary who assisted in the migration of women.

b)  Briefly introduce the background of this person.

c)  Describe how this person positively or negatively changed the position of female migrants.

d)  Clearly specify how the unknown story of the intermediary provides new insights to women’s migration studies.

e)  Follow a bottom-up approach to storytelling, from the specific story to the theory.

We envisage this edited volume to present the lesser-known stories of people involved in women’s migration through a sectional division by the typology of migration (labor migrants and highly skilled and business migrants; irregular, illegal, or undocumented migrants; refugees, asylum seekers; constrained migration; family migration, etc.).

List of Potential Sections (3 chapters in each section):

Labor migrants, highly skilled and business migrants;

Irregular, illegal, or undocumented migrants;

Forced migration, refugees and asylum seekers;

Family migration

Submission Procedure:

Contributors are invited to send by July 10, 2021 an abstract proposal of approximately 350 words clearly explaining the relevance of their contribution to the edited volume, as well as a short biography of themselves. Abstracts should be sent to both Alexandra Yingst (aly3@hi.is) and Stellamarina Donato (s.donato@lumsa.it). Authors will be notified by August 30, 2021 about the acceptance of their proposal. Full chapters (ca. 6000 – 8000 words, including bibliography) are expected to be submitted by February 30, 2022.

Publisher:

The edited volume’s manuscript will be proposed for publication to Women on the Move’s book series at Manchester University Press or Palgrave Macmillan. It is expected to be published by mid-2023.

Contact Info:

Alexandra Yingst (University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland) and Stellamarina Donato (LUMSA University, Rome, Italy)

Contact Email:

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Announcement: Call-for-Abstracts

Deadline for submission: 1st July 2021

SPECIAL ISSUE OF LIFE WRITING: CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

MERITOCRACY AND LIFE WRITING

Editor:  Professor D. L. LeMahieu

Lake Forest College, Lake Forest, Illinois, 60045, USA

lemahieu@mx.lakeforest.edu

Michael Young’s satire The Rise of the Meritocracy (1957) popularized a new term that gained wide currency in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.  Both the social democratic Left and the neo-liberal Right endorsed the notion that intelligence plus effort equaled merit.  Intended to displace an elitism based on birth or social privilege, meritocracy promised upward mobility to those with the talent and work ethic to earn success.  Yet, as meritocracy congealed into a self-sustaining elitism, the concept has attracted intense criticism from meritocrats themselves as well as nativists and populists excluded from positions of power.  The life writing of meritocrats discloses the complex subjectivities of upward mobility during a period of accelerating social change and raises the question of what constitutes merit.

Abstracts are invited addressing any of the topics below.

Abstracts should be between 300 and 500 words and include the author’s institutional affiliation if any. Include 5 or 6 keywords for your approach to the topic.

Due date for abstracts: Thursday 1st July, 2021.

Abstracts should be emailed to the journal’s guest editor at lemahieu@mx.lakeforest.edu

Authors will be notified as to whether the complete paper would be welcome for submission by 16th August, 2021.

Final due date for completed papers if abstract is accepted: 1st December 2021.

Completed papers should be 6,000-8,000 words long, and must

follow the Instructions for Authors on the journal’s website for referencing, endnotes, UK spelling, etc.

Papers will be submitted for blind peer review. This may take about 2 months. Papers that are recommended for publication following peer review will be published online in Life Writing during 2022, with print publication in a special issue to follow.

Topics:

– Meritocratic life writing before the term was coined (Roman “new men”; beneficiaries of the Chinese examination system; Victorian self-help discourse)

– Education, scholarships, and social class in meritocratic narratives

– Gender and meritocracy

– Race and meritocratic life writing

– Structure and personal agency in meritocratic life writing

– Meritocratic virtue: the personal qualities it takes to succeed

– Marxism and meritocratic life writing

– Meritocratic medical doctors, lawyers and jurists

– Politicians and their advisors

– Business women and business men

– Childhood and the origins of personal ambition

– Meritocrats and personal trauma, including terminal illness narratives

– Typologies of meritocratic life writing

– Meritocratic academics and the transformation of higher education

– Meritocratic life writing and identity politics

– How meritocrats process, critique, or ignore their own privileges

– Meritocratic dissenters, including populists and nativists

– Meritocratic theologians and the challenges of secularism

– Ghost writing the lives of famous meritocrats including entertainers

– Neoliberal life writing

– Mentors in meritocratic life writing

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Being Out of Place: Deconstructing Travel Narratives in Postcolonial Arab Literature(via Zoom)

July 1, 2021
contact email:

Conference Director

Dr. Soumaya Bouacida, University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria

Conférence Date:: 20 th Decembre, 2021

Keynote Speakers

-Dr. Robert Clarke is a senior lecturer in English studies, and Head of Discipline, English, in the school of Humanities at the University of Tasmania. He is the editor of several books and issues such as Celebrity Colonialism: Fame, Power and Representation in Colonial and Postcolonial Cultures(2009), “Travel and Celebrity Culture”(special issue in Postcolonial Studies), and The Cambridge Companion to Postcolonial Travel Writing (2018)

Dr.Nouri Gana is professor of Comparative Literature & Near Eastern Languages and Cultures at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). He is the author of Signifying Loss: Toward a Poetics of Narrative Mourning, and the editor of The Making of the Tunisian Revolution: Contexts, Architects, Prospects and of The Edinburgh Companion to the Arab Novel in English.

The Head of the Conference Organizing Committee
Mr. Toufik Laachouri, University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria
Members of the Conference Organizing Committee
Dr.Soumaya Bouacida, University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria
Dr.Zeyneb Benhenda, University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria
Dr. Roumeissa Silini, University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria
Dr. Naima Harbi, University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria
Dr. Bochra Bouteraa, University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria
Ms .Assia Nekakaa, University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria
Ms. Fouzia Krim University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria
Mr. Malek Benkhalaf
Dr. Mounir Karek
Dr. Djihed Messikh University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria
Ms. Imen Bouchagour, University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria
Ms.Fatima Zohra Laidi, University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria
Ms. Fatima Bouglouf, University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria
Ms.Imen Chraita, University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria
Ms. Imen Achouri ,University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria
Ms. Selwa Hadibi, University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria
Msr. Nabila Dendani, University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria
Ms. Nour Elhouda Boudrouma, University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria
Mr. Zin El-din, University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria

The Head of Conference Reading Committee
Dr. Zeyneb Benhenda, University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria
Members of the Conference Reading Committee
-Dr.Soumaya Bouacida, University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria
-Dr. Roumeissa Silini, University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria
Dr. Hayette Harbi, University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria
-Dr. Hichem Souhali, University of Batna 02, Batna, Algeria
-Dr. Moufida Zaidi, University of Mentouri, Costantine, Algeria
– Prof. Nadir Kaouli, University of Batna 02, Batna, Algeria
-Dr. Leila Djaafri, University of Batna 02, Batna, Algeria
-Dr. Farida Lebbal, University of Batna 02, Batna, Algeria
-Dr. Mohamed Seghir Halimi, Ourgla University, Ouargla, Algeria
-Dr. Ahmed Bashar, Biskra University, Biskra, Algeria
-Dr. Nadir Idri, Bejaia University
-Dr. Youcef Awad, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan
-Dr. Tahrir Hamdi, Open Arab University, Amman, Jordan
-Dr.Lina Saleh, Al Balqa Applied University, Salt, Jordan
-Dr.Samira Al-Khawaldeh, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan
-Dr. Aba-Carina Parlog, West University of Timisoara, Roumania
-Dr. Mariam F. Alkazemi, Virginia Commonwealth University, USA
– Dr. Mounir Karek, University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria
-Dr.Salim Sista, University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria
-Dr. Camilia Bechiri, University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria
-Mr. Abdelmalek Ben khalef, University of 20th August 1955, Skikda, Algeria

                                                                                                                           Call for Papers 

I occasionally experience myself as a cluster of flowing currents. I prefer this to the idea of a solid self, the identity to which so many attach so much significance. These currents, like the themes of one’s life, flow during the waking hours, and at their best they require no reconciling, no harmonizing. They are “off” and may be out of place, but at least they are always in motion, in time, in place, in the form of all kinds of strange combinations moving about, not necessarily forward, sometimes against each other, contrapuntally yet without one central theme. Edward Said

In this passage that is taken from Out of Place(1999), a text that dovetails memoir with the travel narrative, Edward Said reads himself as an embodied form of diversity and as a celeberation of a heterogeneous identity since he is ‘a cluster flowing currents’: he is Arab and Christian, Palestinian and American, the Anglophone “Edward” and the Arabic “Said”. Such complex identification comes as a result of his geographical mobility and continuous travel between Cairo and New York, Beirut and London, Jerusalem and Boston, Dhour and Paris. More pointedly, travel is a vehicle through which one can explore how his relationship to a place can shape his own experiences and, thus, his own identity. Travel is not only limited to human beings, but also diseases can travel the globe. Travelling diseases become embricated with the history of different cultures and play a central role in travel writing. In the ongoing wake of COVID-19, the normative modes of travel have witnessed some interruptions, which leads to the mounting of paranoia among people who have been displaced from their homes like migrants, refugees and asylum seekers. Regulations on travel have left this category of people stranded; they face intense deprivations in their right to economic welfare, limited access to school, poor health care, and threats to their safety and protection.
Travel narratives were vital for Said’s Orientalist project because they include accounts of ‘other’ places and peoples that construct distinctions between “the Orient” and “the Occident” and that depict the “ East” as inferior and uncivilized. The description produced by the imperial eye is considered as a justification for colonial projects and imperial expansionism. However, for postcolonial writers and mainly Arab ones, travel texts can convey accounts that defy colonial discourses by deconstructing the binary oppositions of the colonial travel writings, decentering the Western eye and reconceptualizing the relationship between centre and periphery through creating contact zones .This conference, therefore, attempts to examine these debates by exploring the major scholarly works on travel writing by postcolonial Arab writers. This conference fosters a creative dialogue between leading academic researchers and scholars who are willing to exchange and share their experiences and results on all aspects of travel in postcolonial Arab writings and in case of serious situations such as the spread of pandemics (Corona virus is a case in point) . It also provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers to discuss the most recent trends and concerns in the field of travel writing. We would like to take stock of the scholarship concerning travel in Postcolonial Arab literature and we kindly invite prospective authors to contribute to the conference through the submissions of their original research abstracts, papers and e-posters. The topics that could be explored in the conference include but are not limited to:

-Travel and constructions of race, class, and gender
-Constitutions of ‘self’ ad ‘other’ in travel writing
-Travel and diaspora
-Travel and transculturation
-Travel and displacement
-Travel and politics of exile
-Travel and gastronomic culture
-Travel and Topophilia
-Nostalgia/ Solastalgia ,Memory and Trauma in travel writing
-Travel and language
-Contact zones and the relationship between travelers and travelees
-Travel and Pandemics
Paper proposals of up to 250 words in English and a brief biographical note should be sent by 1st July 2021 to travelconference2021@gmail.com. The contributors will be asked to send their full papers by  Novembre, 15 th in order to submit them as a special issue in Quraterly Arab journal after going through a reviewing process..No fees are recommended for this conférence.

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The Institute for the Study of Canadian Slavery, at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NSCAD University), proudly announces a Call for Applications for:
Please note, the first cohort of Institute fellows in 2021-2022 will be virtual, and each fellowship is worth $10,000.00 Canadian Dollars. See further details in the links for each fellowship. For more information contact: theinstitute@nscad.ca

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The Transformative Experience of the Journey via Recollection and Reflection

deadline for submissions:
June 30, 2021

Pacific Modern and Ancient Language Association
Nov. 11-14, 2021
Las Vegas, USA
contact email:

The travel memoir offers an opportunity to examine a number of issues in terms of creative non-fiction. Travel stories focus on individuals who become strangers to themselves when they exile themselves from the environmental and cultural factors that have defined them thus far in service of self-discovery. They link up with the grand Odysseus-like impulse of traditional and modern literature that can profoundly alter identity when they travel and write about their experiences. Topics to consider include the issue of fact vs. fiction in creative non-fiction texts, the idea of the diary as an essential aspect of the transformative experience, and the collaborative relationship between readers and writers in this highly popular genre in terms of identity development.

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Deadline for Submissions June 20, 2021

“Narrating Lives”: International Conference on Storytelling, (Auto)Biography and (Auto)Ethnography

August 28, 2021 to August 29, 2021
Location:
United Kingdom

Life-history approach occupies the central place in conducting and producing  (auto)biographical and (auto)ethnographic studies through the understanding of self, other, and culture. We construct and develop conceptions and practices by engaging with memory through narrative, in order to negotiate ambivalences and uncertainties of the world and to represent (often traumatic) experiences.

The “Narrating Lives” conference will focus on reading and interpreting (auto)biographical texts and methods across the humanities, social sciences, and visual and performing arts. It will analyse theoretical and practical approaches to life writing and the components of (auto)biographical acts, including memory, experience, identity, embodiment, space, and agency. We will attempt to identify key concerns and considerations that led to the development of the methods and to outline the purposes and ethics of (auto)biographical and (auto)ethnographic research.

We aim to explore a variety of techniques for gathering data on the self-from diaries to interviews to social media and to promote understanding of multicultural others, qualitative inquiry, and narrative writing.

Conference panels will be related, but not limited, to:

  • Life Narrative in Historical Perspective
  • Qualitative Research Methods
  • Oral History, Memory and Written Tradition
  • Journalism and Literary Studies
  • Creative Writing and Performing Arts
  • (Auto)Biographical Element in Film Studies, Media and Communication
  • Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy
  • Storytelling in Education
  • Ethics and Politics of Research

Submissions may be proposed in various formats, including:

  • Individually submitted papers (organised into panels by the committee)
  • Panels (3-4 individual papers)
  • Posters

Proposals should be sent by 20 June 2021 to: life-history@lcir.co.uk. Please download Paper proposal form.

Registration fee – 90 GBP    

Contact Info:

London Centre for Interdisciplinary Research

www.lcir.co.uk
info@lcir.co.uk

Contact Email:
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Stories of Home, the Road, and the Host Country: Women Narrating Migration in Morocco

June 11, 2021

Centre for the Study of Contemporary Women’s Writing (CCWW)

INSTITUTE OF MODERN LANGUAGES RESEARCH

School of Advanced Study • University of London

Stories of Home, the Road, and the Host Country: Women Narrating Migration in Morocco

https://modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/events/event/24070

11 June 2021

10.00am – 4.00pm BST

Online Symposium

Organiser: Keltouma Guerch (Mohamed I University, Oujda Morocco)

Judging by the late 20th and early 21st centuries movement realities, migration is no longer a choice nor is it an option among other options. It’s rather an economic, social, and political necessity. For millions of individuals and families around the world, migration is the ultimate survival decision and action. As a matter of fact, movement through unknown lands involves stories of home and the road.

Stories are our daily bread to communicate with others, express joys and sorrows, and survive trials and tribulations. Migrants’ stories help them share their experiences of the terrible journey and how they “survive” in the transit and/or destination countries. The geographic location of Morocco imposed a specific identity on the country as both a transit and destination land, hence, its notoriety as a place where migration plans and human trafficking are massively negotiated. Given the dramatic conditions in which movement from the southern to the northern coasts of the Mediterranean are carried out, migration tales are obviously not romantic ones. In this symposium participants share their scholarly work and research in the field of migration, particularly gendered migration, from different perspectives.

Programme

Panel One, 10.00 – 12.00 BST   (Chair: Keltouma Guerch)

Abdellah El Boubekri (Mohamed I University, Oujda Morocco); “Unconsummated belonging in Laila Lalami’s The Other Americans (2019) and Conditional Citizens (2020).”
Wissam Bitari (Cadi Ayyad University, Marrakesh Morocco); “The Intersection of Diaspora and Postmodern realities in Laila Lalami’s The Other Americans.
Tayeb Ghourdou (Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah University, Fes Morocco); “Identity Construction between Home and Exile: A Comparative Analysis of Laila Lalami’s The Other Americans and Murja Kahf’s The Girl in the Tangerine Scarf.”
Brahim Elaouni (Mohamed I University, Oujda Morocco); “Space and Women Consciousness in the Writings of Lalami the Novelist and Lalami the Essayist.”

Lunch Break: 12.00 – 14.00 BST

Panel Two, 14.00 – 16.00 BST   (Chair: Abdellah El Boubekri)

Mimoune Daoudi (Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah University, Fes Morocco);  “Self-narration in Moroccan Women Diasporic Literature: Najat Elhachemi’s The Last Patriarch, as a case study.”
Zineb  Rabouj (Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah University, Fes Morocco); “Escaping to/from America: Roots and Routes in Anissa Bouziane’s Dune Song.”
Keltouma Guerch (Mohamed I University, Oujda Morocco); “Mothers and Daughters: Home, the Road, and the Host Country in the Narratives of Sub-Saharan Women Migrants Living in North-East Morocco.”
Fatima-Zohra Alaoui Mehrez (Mohamed I University, Oujda Morocco); “Narrating Sub-Saharan African Female Migrants’ Stories in Morocco.”

All are welcome to attend this free event at 10.00am BST on 11 June. You will need to register in advance to receive the online event joining link. To register go to: https://modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/events/event/24070


This symposium is organised as part of the CCWW Seminar Series 2021/22: ‘Precarious Homes – Narratives and Practices of Home-Making in Turbulent Times’ which takes its cue from the CCWW Conference  “‘Where are you from?’ to ‘Where shall we go together?’ Re-imagining Home and Belonging in 21st-Century Women’s Writing“, hosted at the IMLR in September 2020. Dedicated to further exploration of literary and theoretical conceptualisations of home-making, the series considers women’s writing in context, using various formats –  reading groups, a symposium, and an author/translator conversation.

Contact Info:

Cathy Collins

Institute of Modern Languages Research

School of Advanced Study | University of London
Room 239 | Senate House | Malet Street | London WC1E 7HU | UK

Contact Email:

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Event Held–June 3, 2021

Lives: Biography and Autobiography in New Writing on American Art

6/3/2021, 4:00-8:15pm. CEST

The John F. Kennedy Institute of American Studies, Freie Universität Berlin, and the Terra Foundation for American Art are pleased to invite you to this year’s Berlin Terra symposium, Lives: Biography and Autobiography in New Writing on American Art which will be delivered online via Webex on June 3, 2021, 4.00 pm – 8.15 pm (Central European Summer Time). (USA start times: 7:00 am PDT/8:00 am MDT/9:00 am CDT/10:00 am EDT.)

The origins of art history privileged the artist’s biography in the explanation and interpretation of artworks, but such narratives came to be rejected for their heroic and exclusionary narratives of the exceptionalism and isolated genius. In their place, questions of historical, social, and intellectual context took precedence, and the writing of an artist’s life came to seem conservative and unconnected to larger social, political, and aesthetic concerns. However, recent art historical scholarship has found a renewed interest in the details of the lives of artists as embedded in their social and artistic worlds, and these new approaches aim to create a more equitable and diverse narrative of art’s many histories. Biography and autobiography have come to be newly relevant as art history struggles with its legacies of exclusion based on race, gender, sexuality, class, and ability. This symposium will showcase some new biographical and autobiographical approaches to writing American art’s histories, with a view toward the ways in which the life experiences of artists and writers afford opportunities for counternarratives and new ways of understanding the diverse histories of American art. Lives: Biography and Autobiography in New Writing on American Art brings together scholars and curators who discuss the intertwinement and intersectionality of artists’ life experiences with the work they produced from them.

Speakers include C. Ondine Chavoya, Joan Kee, Cyle Metzger, and Helen Molesworth. It is convened by David J. Getsy, 2020-2021 Terra Foundation Professor of American Art.

Please visit the event website for a detailed schedule and log-in details:
https://www.jfki.fu-berlin.de/faculty/culture/terra/Conferences/Getsy_2021/index.html

The symposium is free and open to the public. No registration required. Event language is English.

Contact Info:

Amalie Boye

Terra Student Assistant, John F. Kennedy Institute for North American Studies, Freie Universität Berlin

Contact Email:
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Deadline for Submissions June 1, 2021
CFP for SAMLA 93, taking place on November 4-6, 2021, in Atlanta, GA.
LIFE WRITING

The production of identities and subjectivities across narrative spheres and histories‚ from genres like captivity narratives, slave narratives, autobiographies, biographies, and commonplace books, to contemporary iterations in memoir, blogs, social media, and reality television‚ challenge expectations for how lives can be documented and shared. Life writing crucially expands the bounds of what lives and literatures can look like, demanding that readers attend to histories, lives, languages, and experiences that are often unfamiliar or different from their own. This panel welcomes presentations on any aspect of life writing, and those projects that are related to the conference theme, “Social Networks, Social Distances,” are especially welcome. By June 1, please submit an abstract of 250 words, along with presenter’s academic affiliation, contact information, and A/V requirements, to Nicole Stamant, Agnes Scott College, at nstamant@agnesscott.edu.

Nicole Stamant, PhD
Associate Professor and Chair | Department of English
SUMMIT Faculty Coordinator for Digital in the Curriculum
Pronouns: she/her/hers
404.471.6062 (phone)
nicolestamant.agnesscott.org
Agnes Scott College | 141 E. College Ave. | Decatur, Georgia 30030

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CALL FOR PAPERS 

The Multiple Lives of Memories: Materializing Experiences of Soviet Terror (5/15/2021)

Edited by Samira Saramo (Migration Institute of Finland) & Ulla Savolainen (University of Helsinki)

Keywords: memory; life stories; experiences; materiality; emotion; mobility; violence; repression; Soviet Union

This peer-reviewed international collection of articles focuses on the expansive reach of Soviet Terror through an analysis of the materialization of memories from multi-sited perspectives. The book examines the concrete mobility of life stories, letters, memoirs, objects, and bodies reflecting Soviet repression and violence across borders of geographical locations, historical periods, political regimes, and generations, while simultaneously paying attention to more abstract processes of textual circulation and (re)mediation. The collection asks: what happens to life stories, testimonies, and experiences when they travel in time and space and are (re)interpreted and (re)formulated through these transfers? What types of spaces for remembering, telling, and feeling are created, negotiated, and contested in these contexts? What are the boundaries and intersections of intimate, familial, and community memories?

The book explores these travels as processes of becoming, which reflect productive entanglements of the material, social, and discursive qualities in people’s experiences and memories with Soviet repression and violence. By engaging with current discussions on mediation (e.g. Erll & Rigney 2009; De Cesari & Rigney 2014), reception (e.g. Sindbæk Andersen & Törnquist-Plewa 2017; Etkind 2013), life writing and life storying (Gilmore 2001; Adler 2002; Merridale 2000; Šukys 2017), and materiality (Hirsch 2012; Miller 2011) in (cultural) memory studies and beyond, the collection of articles aims to open new perspectives on the multiple lives of memories, and who and what gets to remember and be remembered. Through this focus, this collection contributes fresh methodological perspectives to the study of Soviet Terror.

We invite article proposals (approx. 500 words) addressing the theme of the book to be sent to the editors (samira.saramo@migrationinstitute.fiulla.savolainen@helsinki.fi) by May 15th, 2021. The proposals should describe the case study, research materials, and methodological framework of the planned article, along with a short biographical statement.Prospective contributors will be informed of decisions by June 1st, 2021. The deadline for the first version of article manuscripts is December 1st, 2021.

The book proposal will be sent with abstracts to an international academic publisher in September 2021 and the collection of articles will be sent for peer review in Spring 2022.

References

Adler, N. 2004. The Gulag Survivor: Beyond the Soviet System. London: Routledge.

De Cesari, C. and A. Rigney, eds. 2014. Transnational Memory: Circulation, Articulation, Scales. Berlin: De Gruyter.

Erll, A. and A. Rigney, eds. 2009. Mediation, Remediation, and the Dynamics of Cultural Memory. Berlin: De Gruyter.

Etkind, A. 2013. Warped Mourning: Stories of the Undead in the Land of the Unburied. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Gilmore, L. 2001. The Limits of Autobiography: Trauma and Testimony. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

Hirsch, M. 2012. The Generation of Postmemory: Writing and Visual Culture After the Holocaust. New York: Columbia University Press.

Merridale, C. 2000. Night of Stone: Death and Memory in Russia. London, Granta.

Miller, N.K. 2012. What They Saved: Pieces of a Jewish Past.

Sindbæk Andersen, T. and B. Törnquist-Plewa, eds. 2017. The Twentieth Century in European Memory: Transcultural Mediation and Reception. Leiden: Brill.

Šukys, J. 2018. Siberian Exile: Blood, War, and a Granddaughter’s Reckoning. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

Call for Chapters: Exploring Student Lives Through Photography, Oral History and Context-based Art

Editors

Lorenzo J. Torres Hortelano, Rey Juan Carlos University (URJC, Madrid), Spain.
Maida Gruden, Students’ City Cultural Center (SCCC, Belgrade), Serbia.

Andrija Stojanović, Students’ City Cultural Center (SCCC, Belgrade), Serbia.

Proposals Submission Deadline: May 15th, 2021
Full Chapters Submission Due: September 15th, 2021

Submission guidelines [link]

Submit your proposal (400-800 words) to lorenzojavier.torres.hortelano@urjc.es and book@theylive.eu

Introduction

This will be an open access book to be published by an international reference indexed publishing company (which will be announced later in 2021). It is aimed to analyze the most relevant aspects of the Creative Europe Project ‘They: Live’Student lives revealed through context-based art practices (2020-2023), through three distinct parts that correspond to its different milestones.

This call is limited to the first part of the book which seeks to involve reflections from various disciplines (history, sociology, anthropology, visual anthropology, political sciences, cultural and curatorial studies, oral history studies, history of photography, aesthetics of digital art and databases….) on the lives of students (University level) from Second World War to the present day. Within the project, photographs from private albums, archives, and oral history testimonies by current and former students will be collected, documented, and showed on Topothek open online platform.

Researchers are welcomed to use it, where other works as photographs, audio, texts databases and research are hosted.

They: Live project focuses on the following topics: the everyday student life, campus-related life, cultural habits and free time, interpersonal relations, gender relations, socio-political engagement of students, from the end of the Second World War until contemporary days on the European level. The field of research can be expanded beyond assigned topics of the project and from different angles and disciplines on student’s lives.

The second part of the book will encompass case studies about Artist in Residences programs on students’ campuses with essay contributions by selected artists and curators involved in the project. And the third part, written by members of the project consortium, will be a step-by-step manual with recommendations for implementation of the organizational methodology of this type of residential stay in student campuses and exhibits.

So, it will be an edited book, a mix of essay, case study and methodology book emerging from the research results of the European project They Live.

Objective

The objective of this book is to address a relevant issue that involves a multidisciplinary approach, that is, the relationships between students’ lives in the campuses, documentary vernacular photography, oral history, contemporary art, and students’ intangible heritage. It is aimed to offer a valuable contribution regarding the challenges and possibilities faced by contemporary art practices and the archiving of the everyday memory of student communities.

Student lives and their activities represent a live reservoir of innovative ideas and relationships, a source through which an evolutionary development of intellectual heritage can be followed, and a completely new view of the European culture and its future development can be established.

This is a relevant and current topic that makes the book suitable for scholars and professionals working in the areas of social sciences (history, sociology, anthropology, visual anthropology, political sciences, cultural and curatorial studies, oral history studies, history of photography, aesthetics of digital art, digital humanities etc). One of the strongest features of the book is the multi-national, trans-generational as well as multidisciplinary approach to the topic.

Therefore, papers need to address both the scientific and practical implications of the research.

Recommended Topics (but not limited)

Cultural studies on student lives – History of student culture, – Student lives from the perspective of sociology: everyday life in campuses, interpersonal and gender relationships –  Political engagement of students – Gender studies related to students’ life – Anthropology of students’ life- Students lives through photography  – Oral history related to students live – Genres of photography coming from students live – Art context-based practices and student lives – Digital archives related to student live photos – Art inspired by student lives – Aesthetics of the archive – Art from archives – Multimedia Art – Comparative view on students’ lives in different countries from the end of WWII until now

This is a list of related papers and books: [link]

Publisher

We are in discussions with international European academic high indexed publishers. This publication is anticipated to be released in Q1 2023.

Inquiries

Lorenzo J. Torres Hortelano

Senior Lecturer professor (tenure)

Rey Juan Carlos University

lorenzojavier.torres.hortelano@urjc.es and book@theylive.eu

http://theylive.eu/kategorija.php?menu_id=15

Thanks and Best regards,

Lorenzo J. Torres Hortelano 

Vicedecano de Extensión Universitaria y Relaciones Internacionales

Vice-Dean of University Extension and International Relations

Profesor Titular/Professor

Universidad Rey Juan Carlos

Facultad de Ciencias de la Comunicación

Departamento de Ciencias de la Comunicación y Sociología

Edificio de Gestión – Decanato

Camino del Molino s/n, 28943 Fuenlabrada

+34 91 488 73 11

lorenzojavier.torres.hortelano@urjc.es

gestion2.urjc.es/pdi/ver/lorenzojavier.torres.hortelano

researchgate.net/profile/Lorenzo_Torres

Lorenzo Torres Academia.edu

IP proyecto Europa Creativa http://theylive.eu/

Contact Info:

Lorenzo J. Torres Hortelano 

Vicedecano de Extensión Universitaria y Relaciones Internacionales

Vice-Dean of University Extension and International Relations

Profesor Titular/Professor

Universidad Rey Juan Carlos

Facultad de Ciencias de la Comunicación

Departamento de Ciencias de la Comunicación y Sociología

Edificio de Gestión – Decanato

Camino del Molino s/n, 28943 Fuenlabrada

+34 91 488 73 11

lorenzojavier.torres.hortelano@urjc.es

gestion2.urjc.es/pdi/ver/lorenzojavier.torres.hortelano

researchgate.net/profile/Lorenzo_Torres

Lorenzo Torres Academia.edu

IP proyecto Europa Creativa http://theylive.eu/

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Call for Papers: FRAME 34.2, “Writing the Mind”

FRAME. Journal of Literary Studies

contact email:

info@frameliteraryjournal.com

In Ellen Forney’s autobiographical comic Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo and Me (2012), the author narrates her journey following her bipolar disorder diagnosis, a journey that sets off an exploration into how her art is connected to that of the “crazy artists” of the past. Just like Vincent van Gogh and Sylvia Plath, whose work has been connected to their mental health status, Forney explores how her condition possibly influenced her art. Through her struggle with identity, medication, and periods of mania and depression, Marbles depicts how Forney arrives at the conclusion that her art is not dependent on her “bipolar brain”: “I’d say my ‘creative thought process’ is there whether I’m manic or stable… It’s just how my brain works” (217).¹ The ways our brains work inform the way we see, understand, and narrate the world we live in, as well as ourselves and others.

The next issue of FRAME will focus on the topic of “Writing the Mind”. We invite scholars of literature and related fields to consider the connections between mental health, writing, and literary studies. How does mental health shape our understandings of literary practices? How does literature shape our understandings of mental health in different contexts? How has this artistic discipline informed the imagery about the way the mind works? And what can literature and literary studies offer to this field of medicine? Themes and topics related to these questions might include (but are not limited to):

  • Literary (mis)representations of mental illness and the usage of stereotypes
  • Literature and mental health stigma
  • The history of gender and sexuality as mental illness
  • The relation between the mental and physical
  • (Life) writing as therapy
  • Disability studies perspectives on the mind
  • The role of literature in the training of medical professionals of the mind
  • Current approaches to mental health in the (medical) humanities
  • Intersections between mental health and other identity categories (e.g. gender, sexuality, race, nationality, religion, etc.)

The questions and concerns presented are only a few of the many themes that could be included in the upcoming issue. If you are interested in writing for FRAME, please submit a brief proposal of 250 words max. before May 21. The deadline for the submission of the full article is August 17. An article for the journal has a word limit of 5400 words, including bibliography and footnotes. For our Masterclass section, graduate students and Ph.D. students are invited to write up to a maximum of 3500 words. Please feel free to contact us at info@frameliteraryjournal.com, should you have any questions. More info can be found on our website: www.frameliteraryjournal.com.

Check our submissions guidelines here.

Please subscribe to our newsletter to stay updated with more news.

¹Forney, Ellen. Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo and Me. Gotham Books (2012).

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Journal of Comparative Literature and Aesthetics (JCLA)
Vol. 44, No. 4, Winter 2021

SPECIAL ISSUE – Telling Lives, Signifying Selves: Life Writing, Representation, and Identity

Guest Editor: Mukul Chaturvedi
Associate Professor of English, Zakir Husain Delhi College, University of Delhi, India

CONCEPT NOTE

Stories have an irresistible charm, and they continue to fascinate us. In fact, stories or narratives are the only way we understand ourselves and our world. If, as Seyla Benhabib (1996) says, “we are who we are, or the ‘I’ that we are, by means of a narrative”, then the narrative of a life or writing about one’s own life may be a crucial way in which the writer can inscribe or access subjectivity. Life writing fundamentally embodies a crises of representation as it struggles to represent a life by ordering it in a narrative form and foregrounds ways of being in the world. As a discourse on the self, life writing traverses’ various disciplinary terrains like history, literature, journalism, ethnography, and pushes the limits of writing the self. Extending the traditional generic boundaries of autobiography and biography, life writing encompasses a vast array of self-induced narrative forms that have spawned in recent years. Other than life writing texts like memoirs, diaries, and testimonies there is also an upsurge in graphic memoirs and digital storytelling that have brought a new dimension to practices of narrating the self. In the field of cinema, biopics have spawned in recent years and there is a keen interest in adapting real-life stories.

Dismantling the notion of a coherent self and positing it as provisional and contingent, life writing acknowledges the complex nature of autobiographical acts and their performative nature in which ‘selves’ are constantly configured through experience, memory, location, identity, and ability. Also, life writing has emerged as a more inclusive genre which allows for collaborations, non-hierarchical connections to emerge as it gives voice to oral and marginalized subjectivities. Interestingly, one key aspect of life writing is how it circulates across languages, cultures, borders through translation and its various trajectories in transnational contexts. While translation of life writing texts as forms of testimonial acts or role of personal narratives in human rights (Gilmore 2017 Smith and Schaffer 2004) has been empowering as narrators find voice and reclaim agency, critics have cautioned towards the pitfalls and appropriation of these texts as they circulate beyond the locus of their origin. (Whitlock 2007)

Addressing the epistemological, ethical, methodological and translational issues in life writing scholarship across varying narrative forms and media, this special issue of JCLA envisages itself as an interface between life writing researchers/academicians, life writing practitioners, life writing translators and calls upon the contributors to examine the sub-themes mentioned below. These themes are only suggestive and in no way restrictive. Contributors are welcome to go beyond them and offer creative and critical insights from a range of life writing forms.

  • Pushing the Boundaries: the limits of life writing
  • Autobiography and Truth Claims
  • Life writing and Memory
  • Life Writing as Testimony
  • Life in Translation: Challenges and Responsibilities
  • Life Writing and Gender
  • Ethics of Authorship: Collaborative life writing
  • Life writing and Censorship
  • Queer & Trans Lives
  • Disability life writing
  • Life on Celluloid: Biopics
  • Digital Storytelling
  • Graphic lives/memoirs
  • Autoethnography

Please submit abstracts of 300 words with a brief bio note.

Last date for the submission of abstract: 15th May 2021
Intimation of selection of abstracts: 30th May 2021
Full Paper (5,000-6,000 words) submission: 15th September 2021

Please email your abstracts to jclaindia@gmail.com with a copy to drmukulchaturvedi0709@gmail.com

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REMINDER–DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS MAY 15, 2021
Stories of Change, Stories for Change

The International Auto/Biography Association, Chapter of the Americas
5th Biennial Conference: October 1, 2021

VIRTUAL

Co-conveners: Laura Beard, Ricia Chansky, Eva Karpinski, and Lisa Ortiz-Vilarelle

Abstracts are invited for the 2021 International Auto/Biography Association Chapter of the Americas 5th biennial conference, “Stories of Change, Stories for Change.” This virtual conference is hosted by the University of Alberta and co-sponsored by the University of Alberta Faculty of Arts’ Signature Area on Stories of Change. 

How do we use narrative to act for change on both personal and communal levels? As we navigate these early years of the twenty-first century what are some of the ways in which we parse through our lives by structuring them as stories? How have we historically crafted stories that enact/ed change? In what ways do our stories chronicle change or even act as change? And how does the circulation of our life stories enact change on local and global levels?  

The co-conveners invite lightning papers (5 minutes) on any aspects of the power of stories in our lives. We understand stories broadly, thinking of the larger stories of our cultures and the individual stories of our daily lives. What is your story of change? What is your story for change? 

Potential subjects include, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  • Storytelling in/as social activism and social justice

  • Storytelling and sharing as community building and acts of belonging 

  • Memory (and its fallibility) in stories of/for change, including collective memory, testimony, testimonio

  • Erasure and silencing in stories and storytelling as undermining erasure and silencing

  • Embodied stories of/for change

  • Stories of migration, diaspora, refugees, resettlement, and citizenship

  • Decolonizing lives through storytelling 

  • Bearing witness through storytelling

  • Telling stories of illness, mortality, disaster, and crisis

  • Storytelling in/through archives, genealogy, and genetics

  • Narrative facilitators — who collect, translate, edit, anthologize, curate and otherwise facilitate the circulation of stories of/for change

  • Stories as objects of collecting and objects that tell stories 

  • How are stories moving through modality, medium, and genre and for what purpose 

Please submit a 150 word abstract for a 5 minute paper and a brief biographical statement by May 15th, 2021. Abstracts must be submitted through the conference website: www.iabaa2021.ca. We expect to notify applicants by June 15, 2021. Inquiries are welcome at iabaa2021@gmail.com

We ask that abstracts be submitted in English or in English and a second language; however, we will assist with arranging translation for scholars who would like to present their papers in Spanish, Portuguese, or French. Please indicate in your abstract submission whether you will need assistance with translation of your paper.

The conference organizers gratefully acknowledge the support of the Kule Institute of Advanced Study, the Arts Resource Centre, the Department of Modern Languages & Cultural Studies at the University of Alberta, and a/b: Auto/Biography Studies.

At the University of Alberta, we acknowledge that we are located on Treaty 6 and Métis territory. These lands are and have been a traditional gathering place for many Indigenous peoples including the Cree, Blackfoot, Métis, Nakota Sioux, Iroquois, Dene, Ojibway/ Saulteaux/Anishinaabe, Inuit, and many others whose histories, languages, and cultures continue to influence our vibrant community.

Laura J. Beard
she/her/hers
Professor, Modern Languages & Cultural Studies, Faculty of Arts
Co-Lead, Arts Signature Area, Stories of Change
Associate Vice President (Research)
Office of the Vice President (Research and Innovation)
2-51 South Academic Building (SAB)
University of Alberta
Edmonton, Alberta Canada T6G 2G7
780-492-5320
The University of Alberta is located in ᐊᒥᐢᑿᒌᐚᐢᑲᐦᐃᑲᐣ / Amiskwacîwâskahikan on Treaty 6 territory, the territory of the Papaschase, and the homeland of the Métis Nation. 

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Biographers International Organization (BIO) and the Leon Levy Center for Biography

announce the 11th BIO Conference, May 14-16, 2021

Highlights of the conference include the keynote address on Saturday afternoon by the BIO Award winner David Levering Lewis and, on Saturday morning, the James Atlas Plenary with David W. Blight and Annette Gordon-Reed in conversation about “Overlooked Lives.” Registration is $99 ($49 for members).   On both Saturday and Sunday you can participate in up to six of twelve panel discussions on subjects ranging from how to choose a subject and conduct interviews to obituary writing and organizing your narrative kaleidoscopically. Registration will provide links to watch pre-recorded plenary events at your convenience and to participate in real-time panels and roundtables with Zoom. At a later date, your registration ticket will provide access to recordings of all twelve panels.   Friday includes the presentation of BIO’s various awards and fellowships plus short readings from new work by BIO members. Sunday will include roundtable discussions and the presentation of the Plutarch Award for the best biography of 2020. 
For a complete conference schedule, go here: https://biographersinternational.org/conference/2021-bio-conference/

To register for the conference, go here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2021-bio-conference-tickets-139035164921    To join BIO, go here: https://biographersinternational.org/member/signup

Dear colleagues,

You are warmly invited to this exciting online event on Friday 7 May, 14.00 – 15.30 (CEST / GMT+2) that brings together two acclaimed women in conversation – Zimbabwean writer Petina Gappah and South African writer and critic Elleke Boehmer – discussing Literature and the Politics of the Past in Southern Africa.

Award-winning author Petina Gappah recently published Out of Darkness, Shining Light (2019), a novel which writes back to the tradition of David Livingstone biographies by imagining the recollections of two of his bearers. Elleke Boehmer is not only a central postcolonial and life writing scholar, but also an acclaimed author in her own right, most recently of To the Volcano (2019). In this event, the authors will read from their recent works and discuss the role of literature in negotiations over the past in the Southern African region.

Register for free here.

You can also visit the event’s Facebook page here.

The event is convened by the project Literatures of Change: Culture and Politics in Southern Africa funded by the Nordic research councils and organised by Astrid Rasch, Norwegian University of Science and Technology; Amanda Hammar, University of Copenhagen; Minna Johanna Niemi, The Arctic University of Norway; Lena Englund, University of Eastern Finland; and Nicklas Hållén, Karlstad University.

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Presentation April 28, 2021

Save the Date!
Orient-Institut Istanbul Spring Lecture Series:
Life Narratives and Gender: Voices of Women in the Near East and Eastern Mediterranean

Leigh Gilmore (Ohio State University)
Autobiographics: Gender, Life Narrative, and Self-Representation

April 28, 2021. 9pm Turkish time (2pm EST)
Please click here to view the full program:
https://www.oiist.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/LIFE_NARRATIVES_BOOKLET_SPREAD.pdf

To attend this virtual lecture series, prior registration is necessary. Please send an email specifying your name and academic affiliation to info@ mappinggenderneareast.org by April 27, 2021 (Tuesday) at the latest.

Dr. Richard Wittmann
Kommissarischer Direktor
Orient-Institut Istanbul
Susam Sokak 16-18, D. 8
TR-34433 Cihangir – Istanbul
Türkei
Tel: +90-212-293 6067
Fax: +90-212-249 6359
E-mail: wittmann@oiist.org
wittmann@post.harvard.edu

Editor – Memoria. Fontes Minores ad Historiam Imperii Ottomanici Pertinentes
http://www.perspectivia.net/publikationen/memoria http://menadoc.bibliothek.uni-halle.de/menalib/nav/classification/2322084
Co-Editor – Life Narratives of the Ottoman Realm: Individual and Empire in the Near East (Routledge)
https://www.routledge.com/Life-Narratives-of-the-Ottoman-Realm-Individual-and-Empire-in-the-Near-East/book-series/LNOR

http://www.ferikoycemetery.org/
https://www.mappinggenderneareast.org/

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Deadline for Submissions, May 1, 2021

The Epistolary Research Network Second Conference (5/1/2021; 10/1-2/2021) Virtual

The Epistolary Research Network (TERN) is pleased to announce its second conference, to be held October 1-2, 2021. This virtual conference seeks papers from scholars everywhere who have an interest in letters and correspondence throughout history.

For thousands of years, in every region of the globe, letters brought people together when physical distance separated them. From princes to prisoners, letters could offer reports across time and distance – greetings and farewells, news from distant friends, consolation in times of anxiety, triumph against rivals, submission to fate. TERN is holding a virtual meeting to explore this aspect of letters and letter-writing in the broadest possible sense, across a range of disciplines and times. Who wrote letters? To whom, and for what reason? What did they discuss? What light do they shed on the human condition, and how are they different from simple conversation?

We seek papers to be read (approximate length, 20 minutes) and discussed at an online conference. We welcome proposals from anyone with an interest in letters and letter-writing, from graduate students to emeritus professors. Possible topics might include, but are not limited to:
– immigrants and emigrants keeping in touch with family
– the significance of correspondence in different historical periods
– forms of composition and their evolution
– email, Twitter, and Facebook in literary perspective
– letters meant for publication vs. private missives

Proposals (maximum 250 words) and a one-page c.v. should be sent to ternetwork@hotmail.com. Deadline is May 1, 2021. The conference language will be English. Publication of selected papers will be arranged following the conference.

https://journals.tdl.org/jes/index.php/jes/announcement/view/4

And for the Journal of Epistolary Studies website

https://journals.tdl.org/jes/index.php/jes/index

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CALL FOR PAPERS

International Workshop:

Narrated Lives, Remembered Selves –Emerging Research in Life Writing Studies

13 and 14 May 2021, online via Zoom

Conference Organizers: Verena Baier (Regensburg), Tamara Heger (Regensburg)

Confirmed Keynote Speakers and Discussants: Prof. Dr. Mita Banerjee (Mainz), Prof. Dr. Sidonie Smith (Michigan), and Prof. Dr. Julia Watson (Ohio State)

“If life writing was a “rumpled bed” in 2000, it is now a messy multi-sensorium, teeming with the potential—and the pitfalls—of vibrant self-presentations across media, geographies, and worlds.”

(Smith/Watson, Life Writing in the Long Run (2017), xlvii)

We invite early career scholars currently working on projects in the field of Life Writing Studies to meet and contribute to dialogues about the significance, potential and pitfalls of studying diverse forms of self-representation today.

In the past decades, Life Writing as a concept has proven a fruitful expansion opening up new perspectives to identify acts, forms, and media of self-thematization that allows to analyze the well-known forms such as autobiography, letters, and diaries, but has also included emerging new arenas of self-presentation and autobiographical discourse, also on the non-textual level.

Following Sidonie Smith and Julia Watson’s approach, Life Writing Studies challenge the ideas of a unified story and a coherent self. Rather, they acknowledge the complexities of autobiographical acts and subjectivities and their performative nature, in which “selves” are constantly produced and remade through memory, experience, identity, spatial location, embodiment and agency.

Thus, the study of Life Writing can be as complex as its materials, which is why in this workshop we want to discuss a number of ongoing international research projects in the field.

As we want to explore new trends and tendencies in Life Writing Studies and engage in open-minded discussions, we deliberately do not choose a thematic focus for this workshop, but will let emerging projects in the field of Life Writing determine the scale of our workshop. Thus, we invite contributions from all areas and disciplines of Life Writing Studies.

We are especially addressing early career scholars, i.e. PhD students and postdocs working on pertinent projects with life writing materials.

We are inviting proposals for short presentations of ten minutes that sketch the main research interests and the core materials, and also address problems and questions that propel and guide a stimulating and fruitful discussion of around twenty minutes.

Please send an abstract of 300 words and a short CV (no more than one page) to both Verena Baier (verena.baier@ur.de) and Tamara Heger (tamara.heger@ur.de), by Monday, 16 April 2021.

*

Dear All,

you may remember that I contacted you last year about a biofiction conference in Leuven. The conference has been postponed to Sept 2021. While the organisers are planning for an actual physical conference in Leuven, they do realise that some scholars may be unable to travel and there will be “alternatives for participating online” if that is the case. So here we go:

Call for papers

As part of the conference Biofiction as World Literature Conference (Leuven, Belgium 15-18 September, 2021), I will convene a panel on

“Gendering Biofiction as World Literature”,

for which I am seeking contributions.

Biofiction is a genre that focuses on individual historical figures but often projects and negotiates larger social or political issues through the individual life. This panel, in keeping with the conference theme, proposes to examine the capacity of biofiction to reflect and, perhaps, to shift perceptions of gender. It asks how particular biofictions can be related to large-scale movements and systems of thought, such as second or third-wave feminism, intersectionality, gender performativity, or more traditional conceptions of gender that operate(d) across national boundaries. Transnational or transcultural biofictions (where the author takes on a subject from another culture or where the subject’s life crossed national boundaries or is thought to have transnational significance) will be of particular interest in this context.

Papers will be 20 minutes long.

The full call for papers for the conference can be found at

https://www.arts.kuleuven.be/biofiction-as-world-literature/call-for-papers

Please send an abstract of 250-300 words for a 20 minute paper, and a brief bio note (150w) to Julia.Novak@univie.ac.at, by 18 April 2021.

With kind regards,

Julia Lajta-Novak

Dr. Julia Lajta-Novak

Department of English and American Studies

University of Vienna

Campus Altes AKH Hof 8.3, Spitalgasse 2

1090 Vienna, Austria

+43(0)699 81761689

www.julianovak.at

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Life Writing as Political Voice

deadline for submissions: 

April 22, 2021

Nov. 11-14, 2021 PAMLA, Las Vegas USA

City dwellers have a unique opportunity to see and engage in group political activities that those in more rural areas do not. Their everyday lives can be impacted by political demonstrations whether they are actively participating or not. The perspectives that we usually get are from the government, press, or political leaders. These accounts miss how people actually experience and understand the protests they see and/or participate in. As such, examining the life writing of those who participated or observed city protests can be intriguing and add a personal element to group politics. This panel will focus on the experiences of those who planned, participated, and/or observed protests in various cities. Ideas to be examined include personal vs. public perception, the individual vs. government, and political activities as community building among others. For example, reading the personal accounts of British suffragists during the Black Friday protest highlights the very real danger the women encountered and the gendered opposition they faced through both physical and sexual assault. Entries can be historical or contemporary and involve any large metropolitan area. While memoirs could be useful in this discussion, pieces can come from online publications, articles as well as diaries and less public life writing.

contact email:

sarah.n.macdonald@gmail.com

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Open positions at EuroStorie: 3 PhD students and 3 post-docs

Deadline 4/23/2021

Dear all,

We are happy to open 3 PhD student positions and 3 post-doctoral positions at the Centre of Excellence in Law, Identity and the European Narratives (www.EuroStorie.org).

We are considering applicants from a range of backgrounds (but not limited to): legal history, history, Roman law, politics, philosophy, political science, political theory, political history, intellectual history, law, theology, anthropology, sociology, and human geography.

The positions are both at the Faculty of Social Sciences and the Faculty of Arts at the University of Helsinki. The deadline for all is April 23rd. For details and how to apply, please see the open calls: https://www2.helsinki.fi/en/researchgroups/law-identity-and-the-european-narratives/open-positions

Please feel free to forward this message to anyone you think might be interested!

Best wishes,
Heta Björklund

— Heta Björklund Projektikoordinaattori / Project coordinator heta.bjorklund@helsinki.fi +358504482563 Eurooppalaisen oikeuden, identiteetin ja historian tutkimuksen huippuyksikkö / The Centre of Excellence in Law, Identity and the European Narratives (www.eurostorie.org) Law, Governance and Space: Questioning the Foundations of the Republican Tradition (www.spacelaw.fi) Siltavuorenpenger 1 A, huone / room 323 PL / P.O. Box 9, 00014 Helsingin yliopisto / University of Helsinki

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Autobiography Panel, 118th Annual PAMLA Conference (4/15/2021; 11/11-14/2021)

118th Annual Pacific Ancient and Modern Languages Association Conference

Thursday, November 11, 2021 to Sunday, November 14, 2021

Virtual and In-Person Panels, Sahara Las Vegas Hotel

Hosted by the University of Nevada, Las Vegas

PAMLA’s Autobiography panel is currently accepting submissions!

We are open to a wide range of paper topics dealing with subjectivity, authorship, auto-fiction, and identity, but are particularly interested in papers that take new interdisciplinary approaches to Autobiography. As such, papers that draw on cognitive science, psychology, phenomenology, critical race theory, gender theory, or intersectionality in their analyses of Autobiography are particularly welcome. Possible topics could include, but are not limited to: collective autobiography; techniques of self-narration; self-fashioning; neuroaesthetics; intersectional subjectivity; philosophy of race. We are also interested in papers attuned to some facet of the conference theme, “City of God, City of Destruction.”

Deadline for submissions: April 15, 2021

Submit an abstract directly through the Autobiography panel submission page, or search the PAMLA comprehensive Call for Papers. Contact Emily Travis (etravis@ucsc.edu) with any questions.

About PAMLA and this year’s theme:

The Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association is a scholarly association designed for those teaching or conducting research in a diverse range of literary, linguistic, and cultural interests, both ancient and modern, in the United States and abroad. PAMLA members include faculty and students in language and literature departments in colleges and universities, as well as interdisciplinary scholars from other disciplines and independent scholars.

This year’s theme, “City of God, City of Destruction,” seeks to take the “form analysis” of Las Vegas in a religious direction, considering this shimmering city in the desert as both celestial emblem and den of sin. More broadly, the 2021 PAMLA conference, while welcoming paper proposals on a wide variety of topics, invites meditation on the connections between ideas of the city and the forms of fiction, and the way both may be informed by a religious poetics.

*

Jan Schroeder / Carleton University

Ordinary Oralities: Everyday Voices in History

Edited by Josephine Hoegaerts and Jan Schroeder

Histories of voice are often written as accounts of greatness: great statesmen, notable rebels, grands discours, and famous exceptional speakers and singers populate our shelves. This focus on the great and exceptional has not only led to disproportionate attention to a small subset of historical actors (powerful, white, western men and the occasional token woman), but also obscures the broad range of vocal practices that have informed, co-created and given meaning to human lives and interactions in the past. For most historical actors, life did not consist of grand public speeches, but of private conversations, intimate whispers, hot gossip or interminable quarrels. It also did not exclusively take place in the chambers of political power, or splashed across the columns of national newspapers. Most voices in history, as Arlette Farge notes in Essay pour une histoire des voix,[1] left their traces only unwillingly, or not at all. The longstanding project of “recovering” the voices of the silenced or marginalized has tended to privilege voice as a metaphor for (stolen) human agency, at the expense of a thorough understanding of the practical materialities of ordinary uses of the voice.

In order to meaningfully include voices and vocal practices in our understanding of history, we suggest an extended practice of eavesdropping instead. Rather than listening out for exceptional voices, this volume calls for contributions that listen in on the more mundane aspects of vocality, including speech and song, but also less formalized shouts, hisses, noises and silences. Moving away from a narrative that centers the public voice, and its use as a political tool and metaphor, we aim to edge towards a history of voice as a history of encounter. Insisting on the intersubjective nature of voice, and its often uncanny ability to ‘travel’ across different personal, social and cultural divides, we aim toward an expansive history of everyday vocality, accounting for the multiplicity and materiality of historical voices. Along with Ana María Ochoa Gautier, we call for an “acoustically tuned exploration” of the archives,[2] on the understanding that ordinary voices in history are not neatly proffered up by single documents, but are often fleeting and muted, and dispersed across textual sites with different stated purposes.

The volume therefore also aims toward geographical and chronological breadth, from any region of the globe, from roughly the seventeenth to the twentieth century. Contributors to this volume seek out spaces and moments that have been documented idiosyncratically or with difficulty, and where the voice and its sounds can be of particular salience. Although the voice, as Jonathan Rée has pointed out, can never be stored and preserved as it is,[3] it does leave traces – and stubbornly following those can lead us away from the conventional grain of the archives[4] and their (institutionalized) logic. Including methods and documents that defy the disciplinary constraints of the modern archives and its historiography[5] will also, we hope, help to make space for an exploration of the mundane encounters that took place throughout history across boundaries that historiography has both uncovered and amplified. Listening in on talks, shouts, and whispers between mistress and servant, adult and child, human and more-than-human, between speakers of different languages and inhabitants of different worlds – or hearing some voices failing to be heard by others  – the volume centers concrete practices of speech and sound.

Rather than exploring what exceptional or symbolic voices have accomplished in the public sphere or for the historical record, our attention is geared towards vocal materiality: the sounding qualities of concrete human voices, as they were projected by concrete, tangible bodies in both public and private spaces: the home, the street, the schoolroom, the market, the prison, the chapel, the workplace. That also implies an interest in the visible and material characteristic of those bodies, and their changing cultural meaning over time: voices were produced not only in particular places and for particular ‘period ears’, but also at the intersection of culturally fluid corporeal practices of gender, age, ability, race and class. A focus on ‘who’ speaks has, in work historicizing ‘great speeches’ in the context of biography often served to obscure those characteristics, insisting on universalistic notions of authority instead. This volume, too, argues for a heightened attention to who speaks, and whose voices resound in history, but refuses to take the modern equation between speech and presence/representation for granted.

Proposals for chapters are welcome by early career scholars and established researchers alike. We invite abstracts of approximately 500 words, with final submissions of approximately 6000 words. Please send abstracts by April 15 to the editors.  De Gruyter has expressed interest in publishing this collection in both paper and e-book formats.

[1] A. Farge, Essay pour une histoire des voix, 2009.

[2] A.M. Ochoa Gautier, Aurality, 2014, p. 3.

[3] J. Rée, I See a Voice, 1999.

[4] A.L. Stoler, Along the Archival Grain, 2008.

[5] C. Steedman, Dust, 2002.

Proposal Deadline: 15 April 2021

Deadline for completed chapters: 15 October 2021

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Deadline for Submissions April 15, 2021

Announcement: Call-for-Papers

This call is for abstracts for a scholarly, international edited collection entitled, Writing Australian History on Screen: cultural, sociological, and historical depths in television and film period dramas “down under”.

Due to effects of the covid-19 pandemic 2020-21, and the strain this has placed on people and businesses (including academics and universities world-wide), the deadline for abstracts for this project has been extended.

New deadline for abstract submissions: 15 April 2021.

It could be said that Australia’s unique history has shaped the diversity of its peoples, and the Australian life-styles of today. Australia is both a very ancient and a very young nation. The diverse Australian Indigenous peoples were and still are the First Australians, and the true owners of the land. Despite the British Empire’s 1770 claim on the land as one of its colonies, and white Australia’s announcement of Australia as a nation with the birth of Federation in 1901, “Australia” was in fact a nation long before that; and so long before the British deportation of convicts to Australia and the subsequent arrival of the Anglo-Celtic-European settlers; and the supposed much earlier arrival of Chinese traders; and the much later arrival of the many different nationalities during the Gold Rushes. In more modern times, there is also the extensive immigration from many different nationalities and cultures, and Australia’s intakes of refugees. All these peoples, whether born in Australia or naturalized, are Australians though some hold dual citizenship.

The Australian nation’s history is closely tied to the national and cultural identity. In many countries, but perhaps more so in Australia, there is no single or fixed national identity. In actuality, an  Australian national identity does not exist rather there is a process of something that is unfurling or “becoming” some semblance of a sort of truth; there is no one history rather many diverse histories that overlay or color each the other; there is no one heritage or culture rather divers heritages and cultures; there is no one religion rather many; all of which sit together, side-by-side, and despite the common myths, not always so well or easily. Numerous writers note that in the Australian society there is a “visible” fracture, and also a disconnectedness between what many Australians have imagined themselves to be a part of in the past. The Australian histories, what came before and what has happened since, and how this has been incorporated or interpreted, together with the Australian environment and the geography of the land, and with Australia’s unique type of multiculturalism, has helped to shape what is variously described as the Australian character, and the society.

Australian television and film period dramas are involved in conversations about who the Australian peoples were, and who they are now in the current time. These types of productions work, or rework, the numerous factors involved in “telling” the Australian story, and in so doing explicitly and implicitly bring to light the many various issues that are as relevant to the Australian society today as they were in the period portrayed on screen. In exploring the deeper issues, these sorts of filmic dramas capture and convey something of the atmosphere/s of a particular time. Admittedly, these same issues may have been viewed differently and drawn different responses in the past to what happens now. Of course, with period dramas, the angle from which the issues are approached, the way in which past times are depicted, and the questions that arise from these discussions,  also depend to some degree or another, on the writer/s and the producer/s own points-of-view and particular agendas and artistic skills, as well as the message/s intended for, or inadvertently conveyed to, the viewer. It can be said that Australian television and film  period dramas raise big questions for the Australian society of today to ponder. Staying specifically with those produced in Australia, examples of these types of period dramas are: the hugely popular television series, The Sullivans (aired 1976-1983); Against the Wind (released in 1978); Redfern Now (aired 2012-2013); A Place to Call Home (premiered in 2013); and the much-loved films, The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith (first screened in 1978); Rabbit Proof Fence (released in 2002); The Dressmaker (released in 2015); Ladies in Black (premiered in 2018).

Some suggestions for potential contributors and questions that could be addressed may include but are not limited to:

  • What are some of the cultural and/or social aspects and issues raised in a particular Australian television/ or film period drama?
  • What are, and how do these types of productions convey, the differences or sameness between the fictionalized portrayals and the realities of the times, and social dictates of the Australian culture then in relation to those of today?
  • In Australian television and filmic period dramas, how might class, ethnicity, culture, race, gender, and history, shape these representations for the viewers?
  • Are there cultural or historical antecedents for consideration of portrayals of the Australian outlook in small and-or large screen period dramas?
  • How are the Australian viewpoints expressed in any one or two or more Australian period screen dramas conveyed to the viewer, and what might be the producers motivations in each case?
  • What makes Australian period drama TV/films distinct from (maybe even bolder than), say, their British counterparts? What happens when British dramas present Australia on film (for example, “Banished” (first released 2015) )?Is Australian history sometimes just a different backdrop or central to interrogating specific issues/themes?
  • How do these Australian dramas restore marginalized histories and voices?
  • Chapters about late 20th-c dramas as well as recently popular ones are encouraged, and could include APTCH, Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries, Ms. Fisher’s Modern Murder Mysteries, Love Child, The Doctor Blake Mysteries, Australia, My Brilliant Career, Gallipoli, Anzac Girls, Emma’s War, and more.

Submission instructions:

At this initial stage, in lieu of “chapters,” this proposed work, Writing Australian History on Screen, calls for extended abstracts for consideration for inclusion in the book.

  • The extended abstracts must be more than 1,000 and less than 1,500 words.

(Full-length chapters of 6,000 – 7,000words each (including notes but excluding references lists, title of work, and key words) will be solicited from these abstracts.)

  • Please keep in mind that your essay-chapter will be written from your extended abstract. Your abstract will carry the same title as your essay-chapter.
  • To be considered, an abstract must be written in English, and submitted as a Word document.
  • When writing your abstract use Times New Roman point 12,and 1.15 spacing.
  • At the beginning of your extended abstract, immediately after the title of your work and your name, add 5 to 8 keywords that best relate to your work.
  • Use the Chicago Manual of Style 16th Edition.
  • Since this work is intended for Lexington Books, USA, please use American (US) spelling not English (UK) spelling, and not Australian English spelling;
  • Use the Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary;
  • Use endnotes and not footnotes, use counting numbers not Roman numerals, and keep the endnotes to a bare minimum, working the information into the text where possible;
  • Do cite all your work in your extended abstract as you would in a full chapter.
  1. a) in the body of the abstract, add parenthetical in-text citations (family name of author and year, and page number/s) (e.g. Smith 2019, 230);
    b) fully reference all in-text citations in alphabetical order, in the References list at the end of your abstract;
  • Please send your abstract as a Word document attached to an email;
  • To this same email please also attach, as separate Word documents, the following:
  • Your covering letter, giving your academic title/s, affiliation, your position, and your home and telephone, your home address, and your email contact details;
  • A short bio of no more than 200 words;
  • Your C.V., giving your publications to date, and the publishing details and dates.

Editors: Professor Julie Anne Taddeo, Research Professor of History, University of Maryland, USA,
and Dr Jo Parnell, Conjoint Research Fellow, School of Humanities and Social Science, College of Human and Social Experience, University of Newcastle, Australia.
Papers should be forwarded to both editors:
Julie Anne Taddeo taddeo@umd.com
Jo Parnell Jo.Parnell@newcastle.edu.au  alternatively annette.parnell@newcastle.edu.au  or joandbobparnell@bigpond.com

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“Digital Expressions of the Self” (Special Issue of Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies)

Deadline for abstracts: 16 April 2021 / Expected date of publication: June 2022

Guest editors: Avishek Ray (National Institute of Technology Silchar), Gabriel Dattatreyan (Goldsmiths),
Usha Raman (University of Hyderabad), Martin Webb (Goldsmiths)

This issue of “Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies“ engages with the digital forms of expressions of the self. We invite papers that explore the ways in which, for instance, digital techniques now allow the construction of selves that often rely more onalgorithms than any ‘original’ referent. Consider, for example, how algorithms simulate images, voices etc. and have become the basis for facial recognition, biometrics and similar datafication concerning the self. This shift is indicative of what we might term posthuman condition. Along these lines, we areinterested in papers that engage with how expressions enhanced by algorithms produce multiple, fractured selves. Following Deleuze, we invite papers that engage with how the in-dividual has become ‘dividual’ in societies of post-control vis-a-vis the introduction of digital technologies. Finally we are interested in how people experiment with creative expressions of the self. Constructing the self in the digital sphere may involve processes of experimentation that in turn allow one to experience the self in multiple ways. This is mediated of course by the apparatus of the digital-codes and algorithms. Digital self-expression occurs both consciously and explicitly, and subconsciously and indirectly. Taking this as a point of departure, this special issue examines the broad range of digital expressions of the self. The issue will pivot around, but not be limited to, these concerns:
 What, in the digital context, defines the self and its boundaries? How is the self articulated in digital culture and cultures of everyday life especially in relation to Web 2.0? When articulated digitally, where do we locate its forms and ontology?
 How is the digital expression of the self different from its analogue counterpart? What affordances of the digital, if at all, reconfigure the self? Consider, certain digital expressions can be evidential (eg: the selfie), viral, emotive or even tactile. How do the materialities of the specific platforms (eg: Instagram, MySpace.com, TikTok videos, Soundcloud, Tinder etc.) then impact the digital self or its expression?
 These platforms have become not only media of self-expression but also experimentation. How do users, especially youngsters, leverage these platforms to experiment with their gender, bodies, sexualities and identities, creating self-representations that often challenge normativity?
 How (im)proximate, in terms of referentiality, is the digital self to the so-called ‘real’ self? What does the digital expression entail epistemologically? How does it speak to the question of
referentiality? In other words, to what extent, if at all, can these expressions be perceived as simulacrum? What is the nature of the human-algorithm interaction involved here?
 How does the notion of the (in)dividual play out while articulating one’s self in the context of digitality, when the (post)human can be prosthetically ‘engineered’, Artificial Intelligence can govern societies, and robots can acquire personhood (or even citizenship)?

Please send a 300-word abstract and a 100-word bio-note to the guest editors:

avishekray@hum.nits.ac.in, g.dattatreyan@gold.ac.uk, usharaman@uohyd.ac.in, m.webb@gold.ac.uk

by 16 April 2021.

Decisions on acceptance will be communicated by 30 April 2021. Full papers will be due by 30 July 2021.

Contact Info:

Dr. Avishek Ray

Assiatant Professor

Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,

National Institute of Technology

Contact Email:

*

Deadline for Submissions, April 3, 2021

Announcement: Call-for-Papers

This call is for abstracts for a scholarly, international edited collection entitled, Cultural Representations of the Second Wife: Literature, Stage, and Screen.
Currently I am seeking a number of academics and professionals in the field who might like to send me an abstract for consideration for inclusion in the book.

Deadline for abstracts: 3 April 2021.

In any culture, religious and cultural beliefs are inseparable, and intrinsic one to the other, and are important to the marriage  customs and laws.

Regardless of whether a culture is mainly monogamous or polygamous, one female figure that attracts attention is the second wife. A woman may become the “second wife” either by fact or by custom, or by religious law, or by de facto relationship, or by concubinage. In most though not necessarily all cultures, and according to the religious and cultural beliefs and laws of a culture, as well as the civil laws of that country, a man who has been but is no longer married may remarry; and in some cultures also, a man who is currently married may marry or take a second wife who may or may not have been formerly married to some different man. In some other cultures, cultural customs, or religious dictates, or accepted practices, or inheritance factors, forbid men who are divorcees or widowers to remarry. Similarly, and perhaps more so than with men, some cultures forbid widows or divorced or abandoned women from remarrying.

It is generally understood that whether she is welcomed by her new in-law family, or not, the first wife as a new wife, brings with her some baggage into the new relationship, into the life of the man she weds, and hence into the family into which she marries, and ultimately into that society; but perhaps this is more so in the case of the second wife.  From antiquity to the present, like the first wife, the second wife features in stories, anecdotes, and jokes, and in both high and low culture, but in a way that is vastly different to how the first wife is depicted. The concept of the second wife is an important part of social and cultural history and ritual in most societies, world-wide, yet it would seem that to date, there are no published scholarly edited collections, no academic books, on representations of the second wife from the angle suggested in this cfp.

In can be said that in any culture, the role of the second wife may differ to that of a first wife. The act of becoming and the experience of being a second wife may also be somewhat different to that of being a man’s first wife. Questions arise: within any culture, regardless of her status as a woman, what are the implications for a woman who marries a widower or divorced man? Likewise, what are the implications for a second wife in a polygamous relationship? This scholarly edited collection will reveal how the personal expectations and actual experiences of the second wife may differ from the social and cultural expectations and realities of the role of the second wife; and how the second wife may be perceived in the popular and social culture of various cultures, in screen, stage, and literary productions and pop culture narratives.

Some suggestions for potential contributors to consider, and that could be addressed, may include but are not limited to are:

  • What are the cultural and social duties of the second wife; what are the cultural expectations of her; and what are her personal realities and expectations, as represented in the popular culture of a particular culture/society? Is it possible to detect differences or sameness between the fictionalized portrayals and the realities and social dictates of that culture?
  • What are the distinctions between how the second wife has been typically represented in jokes and anecdotes, to that in popular and social culture as literature, film, drama, and television?
  • How do class, ethnicity, culture, race, gender, and possibly history, shape representations of the second wife?
  • Are there any powerful cultural or socially historical antecedents for the representation of the second wife in popular/social culture, as screen, stage, and literary productions?
  • What are the creators and/or the producers intentions behindtheir portrayals of the second wife; what are the messages or lessons they intend for their audiences through these depictions?
  • How would we establish the underlying cultural, historical, or production motivations for particular depictions of the second wife?
  • How often, if at all, are these representations told from the point-of-view of the second wife herself?
  • What is the range of ways in which the second wifeis represented in the popular/social culture of the various societies?
  • Is it possible to identify contemporary writers of popular culture in literature, film, and drama, who center their work on representations of the second wife? Do any of these writers illuminate individual representations of the second wife figure in a new and innovative way?
  • Is there a difference between the ways in which the second wife is represented in cinematic film to that in small screen, and between those mediums to representations in drama, and to literature? Or in these representations, is there a reasonably broad consensus between these genres?

This collection of scholarly essays will make an intervention in the field: it will be the first of its kind to make a comprehensive study of what being a second wife means to and for the woman, the family, the community, the culture, and the society to which she belongs; to explore whether or not there are characteristic features of the second wife between cultures that may have either some similarity, or that are totally dissimilar, in popular belief and popular culture; to document and record how various eastern and western societies perceive and represent the socially and culturally important figure of the second wife in screen, stage, and literary works and pop culture narratives; to indicate if there is agreement or difference between the various cultures on how the figure of the second wife is represented in popular culture to the viewing/reading audiences; to establish a new and dynamic area of theoretical research crossing family studies, women’s studies, cultural studies, social history, gender studies, social studies, and the humanities in general; to point the way to possible future cross-disciplinary work through examining various peoples and societies by way of cultural representations of the second wife; and to permit scholarly consideration of the extent to which the creators and producers of narratives about the second wife place this figure on the perimeter of society or at its center.

Full-length chapters of 6,000 – 7,000words each (including notes but excluding references lists, title of work, and key words) will be solicited from these abstracts.

The extended abstracts must be more than 1,000 and less than 1,500 words.

  • Please keep in mind that your essay-chapter will be written from your extended abstract. Your abstract will carry the same title as your essay-chapter.
  • To be considered, an abstract must be written in English, and submitted as a Word document.
  • When writing your abstract use Times New Roman point 12,and 1.15 spacing.
  • At the beginning of your extended abstract, immediately after the title of your work and your name, add 5 to 8 keywords that best relate to your work.
  • Use the Chicago Manual of Style 16th Edition.
  • Since this work is intended for Lexington Books, USA, please use American (US) spelling not English (UK) spelling, and not Australian English spelling;
  • Use the Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary;
  • Use endnotes and not footnotes, use counting numbers not Roman numerals, and keep the endnotes to a bare minimum, working the information into the text where possible;
  • Do cite all your work in your extended abstract as you would in a full chapter:Submission instructions:
    At this initial stage, in lieu of “chapters,” this proposed work, Cultural Representations of the Second Wife, calls for extended abstracts for consideration for inclusion in the book.
  1. a) in the body of the abstract, add parenthetical in-text citations (family name of author and year, and page number/s) (e.g. Smith 2019, 230);
    b) fully reference all in-text citations in detail and in alphabetical order, in the References list at the end of your abstract;

Please send your abstract as a Word document attached to an email;

  • To this same email please also attach, as separate Word documents, the following:
  • Your covering letter, giving your academic title/s, affiliation, your position, and your home and telephone numbers, your home address, and your email contact details;
  • A short bio of no more than 250 words;
  • Your C.V., including a full list of your publications and giving the publishing details and dates, and including those in press, and published.

Editor: Dr Jo Parnell, Conjoint Research Fellow, School of Humanities and Social Science, Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle, Australia.
Papers should be forwarded to:
Jo Parnell at: Jo.Parnell@newcastle.edu.au  or annette.parnell@newcastle.edu.au or joandbobparnell@bigpond.com

Deadline for Submissions, March 31, 2021

*Diversifying Persona Studies: Online International Conference and Special Issue*
-What is persona studies? What should persona studies be?
-How can the field be as inclusive and diverse as possible?
-What are possible futures for persona studies research and scholarship?
In 2021 we wish to ask hard questions about the assumptions and the scope of study that have hitherto grounded the field. We see this as a crucial opportunity to destabilise and to interrogate what we do and why we do it, to make space for new voices and areas of study, and to actively facilitate inclusive scholarship.

*Participation in the online conference is in two parts.
Accepted presenters pre-record a 10 minute research presentation and submit with an extended abstract of 800-1000 words. These will be collated into themed playlists, equivalent to a conference session. These playlists, extended abstracts and author bios will be circulated in a program to registered presenters and other participants for viewing throughout July and August.
Presenters will then be invited to participate in a webinar with others from their playlist or theme. The webinar will be broadcast live and be equivalent to a panel and Q&A discussion. Those watching the livestream will be able to ask questions, through the webinar chair, both before and during the panel. The webinars will be crucial opportunities to discuss, develop, and grow our work.
All presentation proposals can also be considered for inclusion in the special double issue of Persona Studies. This issue will be, as always, online and open-access, with no APCs.
All topics relate to Persona Studies will be considered but we particularly encourage and welcome submissions that address:

-understudied theories of persona
-challenging persona studies
-queering personas
-activism and persona
-indigeneity and persona
-race and persona
-disability and persona
-age and persona
-gender and persona
-exceptional personas
-contested personas
-personas and the banal
-persona and migration/diaspora
-other considerations of difference, diversity, and justice with a persona studies framework

*Call for Papers:*
Abstracts: In the first instance, submit a 300-500 word abstract outlining the proposed presentation and its connection to the theme of diversifying persona studies. Please include title, brief author biography, and indicate whether you’d like to be considered for the 2021 special issue.
Send abstracts to personastudies@gmail.com with the subject heading “Diversifying Persona Studies” by 31 March 2021.

Special Issue: Building on the pre-recorded presentations and the webinar discussions, Persona Studies will be issuing a special issue on the theme of Diversifying Persona Studies in late 2021. Invitations to submit full length (6000 words) papers will be based on abstracts submitted to conference. Full papers will be due 16 August 2021.

Key dates:
-Abstracts due: 31 March 2021
-Notification of acceptance to present, invitation to submit full paper; Registration opens: 15 April 2021
-Pre-recorded presentation and extended abstract due: 14 June 2021
-Registration closes: 5 July 2021
-Curated playlists and programs released: 5 July 2021
-Discussions with authors, livestreamed and recorded (dates indicative only): 16 July 2021, 23 July 2021, 30 July 2021, 6 August 2021
-Full papers due for peer review: 16 August 2021
-Special issue released: October 2021
Costs: This conference and webinar series is being run on a volunteer basis. We are asking a nominal registration fee for participants of AU$50 to offset the costs of administrative support. Contingent, unwaged, and student presenters can apply to have this cost waived upon notification of acceptance. Your capacity to pay will not impact your ability to participate.

*

Deadline for Submissions, March 22, 2021

CFP: Roundtable on Race, Religion, and Archives (3/22/2021; 1/6-9/2022)

Modern Language Association: Washington, D.C.

We invite topics that explore the relationships between race, religion, and archives for an approved session of the Religion and Literature Forum of the MLA. We welcome interdisciplinary work at the intersections of critical race theory, religious studies, cultural geography, health humanities, women and gender studies, and more. Proposals could include but are not limited to the following broad themes:

Archival theory and praxis

Politics of recovery

Digital projects

Reparative histories

Problems of genre

New archival research

Potential and limitations of archives

Decolonization

Silences and resistance

Memory

Orality

Presentations are expected to be brief. The exact time limit depends on the final number of panelists. The goal is to have plenty of time for robust discussion. Please send 250 abstract and cv to kdb13@psu.edu by March 22.

*

Deadline for Submissions, March 25, 2021

Autobiography: excess, self-expenditure

 

19th International Meeting of the Scientific Observatory of Autobiographical Memory in Written, Oral and Iconographic Form

30 June 2021, 1-2 July
Academia Belgica, Via Omero 8
00196 Roma

Deadline for Submissions: March 25, 2021

organised by the cultural association Mediapolis.Europa
http://mediapoliseuropa.com/

in collaboration with Mnemosyne, Magazine scintifique – Presses universitaires de Louvain
https://ojs.uclouvain.be/index.php/Mnemosyne

and

l’Academia Belgica
Via Omero 8- 00196 Roma
http://www.academiabelgica.it/

Preamble: In the current global situation due to Covid-19, the themes of excess, moderation, exaggeration, of ‘too much’, seem to be taking a particularly important place as we are forced to change our lifestyle. The limits imposed upon us may appear extreme to us, and yet even the old customs to which we compulsively adhered can be seen in a different light.

Proposals on this topic will be read with much interest.

The excess

“Although an entire intellectual tradition sees the flight of the soul out of its material bonds to be a positive good, another learned tradition that also goes back to ancient sources appeals to a different sense of the word ‘excess’ to designate that which goes beyond the correct proportions in the material order itself.” (Starobinski J. 2008, p. 75).
Breaking boundaries and excess constitute the prime movers of different narrations in the first person. How are these behaviours delineated in self-narration? In what way do they construct a person’s identity? With which arguments and in which relationship with the idea of Power?
With this call for papers we intend to invite proposals that consider self-expenditure and excess in autobiographical writings. That is, autobiographies by both ordinary people and recognised individuals, which are not supported, legitimated, by ideological plaudit, be it political, religious, etc.
Every culture sets ethical boundaries with which every individual confronts oneself. Crossing  boundaries is allowed in certain liberating situations such as bacchanals or carnivals, but these are circumscribed in terms of time and space.
The unlimited and the infinite correspond to conceptions with different nuances: it is possible to go beyond recognised forms or to act in an infinite motus while denying the existence of boundaries.
Current parlance translates the idea of boundary using a vocabulary borrowed from geometry: measure, the right way, to be square, to be conclusive (that is, to remain within a circumscribed topic or area of action), etc. In medio stat virtus situates virtue in space. It is a locution of medieval scholastic philosophy that appropriated Aristotle’s conception.
Nicomachean Ethics, a posthumous publication by Aristotle (who lived from 384 or 383 to 322 BC), places at the centre of its reasoning endoxa, the common opinions of both ordinary and learned people. These endoxa are the boundaries that derive from society’s orientation. Aristotle does not necessarily share current opinions but appropriates them as the basis of social bonding. They appear as a behavioural diktat and have a pragmatic value. In Book II of Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle writes that virtue develops pragmatically: one learns how to build by building, how to play cithara by playing it, etc.
How is ethics conceived of? “this is concerned with emotions and actions, in which one can have excess or deficiency or a due mean. […] Virtue, therefore is a mean state in the sense that it is able to hit the mean. […] so this is another reason why excess and deficiency are a mark of vice, and observance of the mean a mark of virtue (Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, II, 6).
Different autobiographies embody a willingness to go beyond the recognised and shared boundaries.
It is possible to establish a certain distinction between the behaviour whereby a boundary is recognised and overcome, and the practice of excess as complete rejection of the boundary, such as a way of acting ad infinitum.
As Jean Starobinski reminds us (Starobinski J., 2008, p. 76), the term ‘excess’ in the Bible refers to the exit of life, excessus vitae. An excess that does not recognise boundaries is a serious threat to the social system. “The myth of Dom Juan came about at a moment in European history when the subject of the inconstancy of the human heart and the related subject of its various drives—feeling, knowing, dominating (libido sentienti, libido sciendi, libido dominandi)—were intensely debated by the moralists of the day” (Ibidem).
The two great myths of modernity, Faust and Don Giovanni, are condemned due to two excesses: libido sciendi and libido sentiendi. Already the Middle Ages deplored sapiens mundi. Ulysses in Dante’s Inferno is an example of this.
In fact, excess practised ad libitum aims at laying claim to an eternalisation of one’s own behaviour, a transcendentality, replacing another power.
The exhibition held at the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, on the occasion of the 200 th anniversary of de Sade’s death (2014), which was organised on the basis of de Sade’s various epistolary evidence, was entitled Attaquer le soleil: that is, aspiring to deprive the universe of the vital star, using it to burn the universe itself. (Le Brun A., 2014, p. 19).
Many autobiographical narrations in Romanticism (relating to dandyism, satanism, alcoholism, and others) would make excess the centre of their own existential narration.
In “Être comme excès”, Rocco Ronchi writes: “what opens to me the immensity in which I lose myself is the being as excess, a being deprived of material reality, throbbing, rhythmical – a being which has in itself an integral transcendence, a being that is uncontainable in the shape of identity and exceeds the space that reveals apophantic judgement. This being is not immobile, its manner of being – its essence in the verbal sense – rightly resides in the fact of transcending, of rotating outside of itself (I am borrowing this sentence from Marc Bloch), of getting lost and challenging oneself” (Ronchi R., 2000, p. 8).
The term ‘self-expenditure,’ therefore, has a particular role and different significant values. In sport, self-expenditure can be identified with what is at stake, the challenge, the individual risk outside of the great apparatuses.
“The Notion of Expenditure” by Georges Bataille (1933) examines how society imposes productivity in its entire spectrum. Society recognises the right to acquire, conserve or consume rationally, but it excludes the principle of unproductive expenditure (Bataille G., 1985, p.137). It is the principle of loss, that is, of unconditioned expenditure (Ibid., p.169). Societies in general, and the Western one due to their economic structure, do not want to squander the essence of their own assets and regard the person as an asset, a capital.
Acting in itself must not be in the service of any return or recompense. These are arguments to which Bataille returns in various writings (e.g. On Nietzsche, 1945). Concepts such as useful/useless, gratuitous/interested, arbitrary/imposed, are involved.
Is this a form of revolt? According to Camus, revolt embodies the very identity of the individual, his cogito (Camus A., 1951). The rebel does not recognise impositions: he is not a revolutionary and does not conceive of systems (revolution meaning strategic and preconceived acting aimed at achieving an ideal that overturns the status quo). The rebel fights against any ideological barrier and cage. Camus evokes the figures of Cain, de Sade, Saint-Just, Lautréamont, Rimbaud, Bakunin, Nietzsche.

The idea of anti-utilitarianism is ennobling. Self-expenditure without concatenations is in many respects a chimera. A grade-zero behaviour, without residues, cannot exist.
Nevertheless, taking shelter in the necessity of being productive (in every sense) may in turn constitute a form of power. Being losers may mean annihilating the power that the Other exerts on ourselves (Lippi 2008, p. 62).
Years ago, in an article published in Il Tempo (Pasolini P. P., 1973), Pasolini reviewed the autobiography of a Russian pilgrim, associating him with Lazarillo de Tormes. The pilgrim about whom Pasolini writes (who we understand from the text was 33 years of age in 1859) wanders with the prayer book Philokalia (love of the beautiful) and recounts his wanderings to a spiritual father.
Pasolini writes that the pilgrim and Lazarillo remain invincible in their resigned nature that annihilates the very idea of power due to excess of passivity: “There is nothing that proves power wrong so much as Resignation, which is actually a refusal of power in any form (that is, it makes it what it actually is, namely an illusion)”.
The implications of self-expenditure and the practice of excess are manifold, as you can see.
With this call for papers we intend to investigate the relationship between autobiographical narration as an expression of going beyond, as a pursuit of the extreme in relation to the concept of boundary, or as a practice of excess, understanding how, stated or implied, these components constitute the framework of the argument of the writing examined.

Some biographical references

ANONYMOUS, The Way of a Pilgrim: Candid Tales of a Wanderer to His Spiritual Father, translated by Anna Zaranko with an introduction by Andrew Louth, Penguin Books, 2017.
ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics, translated by H. Rackham, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd., 1934. [Fourth century BC].
Georges BATAILLE, “The Notion of Expenditure” in Visions of Excess: selected writings, 1927–1939, edited by Allan Stoekl, translated by Allan Stoekl with Carl R. Lovitt and Donald M. Leslie,
University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis, MN, 1985 (Originally published in La part Maudite,
Paris, Points, 1933). http://itech.fgcu.edu/faculty/bhobbs/Bataille-the-Notion-of-Expenditure.pdf
Julien BEAUFILS, Solenne CAROF, Anne SEITZ et Philipp SIEGERT, « Excès et sobriété. Construire, pratiquer et représenter la mesure et la démesure. Introduction », Trajectoires [En ligne], 10 | 2016, mis en ligne le 01 décembre 2016, consulté le 18 octobre 2020. URL :
http://journals.openedition.org/trajectoires/2172 ; DOI : https://doi.org/10.4000/trajectoires.2172
Albert CAMUS, The Rebel, translated by Anthony Bower, London, Penguin Books, 2000.
Benvenuto CELLINI, Vita di Benvenuto Cellini, edited by Orazio Bacci, Firenze, Sansoni, 1901.
(Written between 1558 and November1562).
https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k1118599/f4.image
CASANOVA, Histoire de ma vie, Paris, Livre de Poche, 2004.
Mémoires de J. Casanova de Seingalt, écrits par lui-même, written in French, between 1789 and 1798, published posthumously in1825. https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k314854/f1.image vv. I-
Thomas DE QUINCEY, Confessions of an English Opium-Eater, 1821.
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2040/2040-h/2040-h.htm
Annie LE BRUN, SADE-Attaquer le soleil, Paris, Musée d’Orsay-Gallimard, 2014.
Silvia LIPPI, “De la dépense improductive à la jouissance « bavarde»”, in Transgressions. Bataille, Lacan, edited by S. LIPPI, Toulouse, ERES, “Point Hors Ligne”, 2008, pp. 62-71.
URL: https://www.cairn.info/transgressions–9782749209753-page-62.htm
Marie José MONDZAIN, De l’excès, Théatre/Public 178.
P. P. PASOLINI, “‘Come pregare?’ ‘Come mangiare?’ Esperienze di un Prete e di un Letterato”, in Il Tempo, 11 February 1973.
Rocco RONCHI, “Une ontologie de l’excès”, Lignes, 2000/1 (n° 1), pp. 107-124. DOI : 10.3917/lignes1.001.0107. URL: https://www.cairn.info/revue-lignes1-2000-1-page-107.htm9
Jean STAROBINSKI, “Registers of Excess,” in Enchantment: The Seductress in Opera, translated by C. Jon Delogu, New York, Columbia University Press, 2008. (Originally published as Les
enchantresses, Paris, Seuil, 2005).
Lionel TERRAY, Les conquérants de l’inutile: des Alpes à l’Annapurna, Paris, Gallimard, 1961.

Autobiography: excess, self-expenditure
30 June – 1, 2 July 2021 – Rome

LANGUAGES ADMITTED FOR THE INTERVENTIONS: English, French, Italian, Spanish.

Every speaker will speak in their chosen language; there will be no simultaneous translation. A rough passive understanding would be desirable.
A) The deadline for the submission of papers is 25 March 2021. Candidates are asked to present an abstract of up to 250 words, with citation of two reference texts, and a brief curriculum vitae of up to 100 words, with possible mention of two publications, be they articles or books. These must be submitted online on the conference registration page of the http://mediapoliseuropa.com/ Website.
The scientific committee will read and select every proposal that will be sent to the conference registration page of the http://mediapoliseuropa.com/ Website. For any information, please contact the following: beatrice.barbalato@gmail.com, irenemeliciani@gmail.com,
Notification of the accepted proposals will be given by 30 March 2021.
B) In regard to enrolment in the colloquium, once the proposal is accepted the fees are the following:
Before 10 April 2021: 110,00€
From 11 April to 10 May 2021: 130,00€
Enrolment cannot be accepted in loco.
Ph.D. students:
Before 10 April 2021: 75,00€
From 11 April to 10 Mai 2021: 90,00€
Enrolment cannot be accepted in loco.
C) For information on registration fees, past symposia, the association’s activities, and the organising and scientific teams, please refer to our Website:
http://mediapoliseuropa.com/
The association Mediapolis.Europa contributes to the publication of the journal Mnemosyne, o la costruzionedel senso, Presses universitaires de Louvain, www.i6doc.com,
Indexed a scientific journal in:

https://dbh.nsd.uib.no/publiseringskanaler/erihplus/periodical/info?id=488665

Scientific Committee
Beatrice BARBALATO,
Mediapolis.Europa May CHEHAB,
Université de Chypre Fabio CISMONDI,
Euro Fusion
Antonio CASTILLO GÓMEZ, univ. Alcala de Henares
(Madrid)
Giulia PELILLO-HESTERMEYER, Universitat Heidelberg
Anna TYLUSIŃSKA-KOWALSKA, Uniwersytet
Warszawski

Management
Irene MELICIANI, managing director Mediapolis.Europa

Deadline for Submissions, March 5, 2021

Players and Pawns: Political Childhoods, Political Children
Children’s Literature Division, MLA
Special Session, MLA (Modern Language Association) 2022

Location/Dates: Washington DC, 6-9th January, 2022

Deadline for submissions: March 5, 2021

“Think of the children,” we say, again and again using the child as the object of political discourse. Policies and laws governing everything from education and public health to minimum wage and sexual relations are enacted with the intent of protecting children and improving their lives. So often, however, children are denied the ability to be perceived and accepted as political agents themselves. In fact, when children and teens, such as Malala Yousafzai, Greta Thunberg, Mari Copeny (Little Miss Flint), and David Hogg, among many others, become involved in politics, adults often criticize their efforts, arguing that children possess neither the experiences nor the knowledge to be involved in political discussions or to advocate for policy changes.

As children’s and YA literature affirms, children and teens both are used for the political gain of others and are themselves interested in politics. Drawing on children’s and YA literature, as well as films and other forms of youth media, this panel considers what it means to be a political child and/or how children are used by politicians. In other words, in what ways are children players in the game of politics, and in what ways are they pawns?

Papers might consider the following questions:

What are the politics of the child?

How is the political child constructed by adults? By children?

What kinds of childhood are instrumentalized by people in positions of power, and to what end?

What does it mean to “fight for the children?” How does the desire to protect children affect political children?

What is the child’s role in politics?

In what ways do children and teens resist political power?

How does the political child embody agency?

How might children politicize themselves?

Which possibilities or which limitations of children’s agency are inherent in political discourse?

Who is included and excluded from being a political child?

How does the political child collaborate with the political adult?

What is the politics of childhood without the guise of futurity?

What is the connection between anti-fascism and children’s and youth media.

Please submit 300-word abstracts and a brief biography to Miranda Green-Barteet (mgreenb6@uwo.ca) by March 5, 2021.

*
Deadline for Submissions, March 4, 2021

CFP–Four Life Writing Forum Panels, Modern Language Association (3/5/2021; 1/6-9/2022) Washington DC, USA

Documenting Isolation

How do life writers make meaning of selves and experiences in/of isolation in or through their texts? Papers examining historical and/or contemporary life narratives of isolation invited. Submit 300-word abstract and bio.
Deadline for submissions: Friday, 5 March 2021
Megan Brown, Drake U (megan.brown@drake.edu ) Laurie McNeill, U of British Columbia (laurie.mcneill@ubc.ca )

Transnational Black Auto/biography

Papers on Black life writing engaging African diasporic transnationalism, self-representation, Black liberation, political activism, and/or intellectual analysis, from precolonial petitions to BLM auto/biographies and beyond. 300-word abstract and bio.
Deadline for submissions: Friday, 5 March 2021
Joycelyn K. Moody, Joycelyn Moody (joycelyn.moody@utsa.edu ) Angela Ards, Boston C (ardsa@bc.edu )

Memoir as Politics

How do life stories in various forms reflect and comment on political and social issues? Papers may address (but are not limited to) memoirs by politicians and other public figures. 300-word abstract and brief bio.
Deadline for submissions: Friday, 5 March 2021
Angela Ards, Boston C (ardsa@bc.edu ) John David Zuern, U of Hawai‘i, Mānoa (zuern@hawaii.edu )

Stories of Destierro
How to craft contemporary life stories of destierro: expulsion, banishment, and deportation? Who’s telling these stories, and in what forms? 300-word proposals focused on Greater Mexico and beyond.
Deadline for submissions: Friday, 5 March 2021
Sergio Delgado Moya, Emory U (sdelga4@emory.edu ) John David Zuern, U of Hawai‘i, Mānoa (zuern@hawaii.edu )

Deadline for Submissions March 1, 2021

Call for contributions to a Journal of Scandinavian Cinema In Focus section highlighting Musical Biopics and Musical Documentaries from the Scandinavian countries

This is a call for short subject contributions (2000-3000 words) focusing on how Scandinavian film and television have presented musicians, singers, bands and orchestras in biopics and documentaries. We welcome submissions that – after a quick theoretical introduction and concise contextual background – offer discussions of topics such as:

– the film’s role within cultural memory – usually restricted to a single national market and often catering to a certain age group’s intragenerational memories

– the handling of generic conventions; from narration and characterization to the selection of music, casting choices and staging of performances

– the function of music in specific films and film genres

– marketing and authentification discourses, including media coverage of stars and their work with particular roles and performances, as well as screenwriters’ and directors’ use of biographies, interviews, original footage and recordings

– national and international reception of such films

Please send contributions to Anders Marklund (anders.marklund@litt.lu.se) and Ewa Mazierska (EHMazierska@uclan.ac.uk) by 1 March 2021. Make sure that you follow the most recent Notes for contributors, available at Intellect’s journal pages: https://www.intellectbooks.com/journal-of-scandinavian-cinema.

The publication of the In Focus section will coincide with the eighth Lübeck Film Studies Colloquium discussion of the topic and with screenings of select musical biopics and documentaries at Lübeck’s Nordic Film Days festival. These events are arranged in October/November 2021 – with more information available (in due course) online at https://www.nordische-filmtage.de/en/index.html.

Deadline for Submissions March 1, 2021

2021 Oral History Association Annual Meeting CFP: “Moving Stories” (3/1/2021; 10/17-21/2021)

The OHA’s Call for Proposals for the 2021 Annual Meeting is now open!

Find the portal here: https://convention2.allacademic.com/one/oha/oha21.

Find additional tips and guidelines for submitting here: https://www.oralhistory.org/submission-guidelines/.

Keep an eye out for additional information about the Annual Meeting here: https://www.oralhistory.org/annual-meeting/.

The deadline for submission is March 1. 

Proposal Queries may be directed to:

Nikki Yeboah, 2021 Program Co-chair (San Jose State University, nikki.yeboah@sjsu.edu)
Sara Sinclair, 2021 Program Co-chair (Columbia University, ses2235@columbia.edu)
Amy Starecheski, OHA Vice President (Columbia Oral History MA Program, aas39@columbia.edu)

For submission inquiries or more information, contact:

Faith Bagley, Program Associate, 615-898-2544, oha@oralhistory.org

Contact Info:

Oral History Association

Box 193/Middle Tennessee State University

Murfreesboro, TN. 37132

Contact Email:

oha@oralhistory.org

URL:

http://oralhistory.org

Deadline for Submissions March 1, 2021

Biographers International Organization (BIO)

is accepting applications for

The Hazel Rowley Prize
$2000 for an Exceptional Book Proposal from a First-time Biographer

This prize is given to the author of an exceptional book proposal for a full-length biography. In addition to the $2,000 award, the winner will have their proposal evaluated by an established literary agent. They will also receive a year’s membership in BIO, along with registration for the annual BIO conference, and publicity for the author and project through the BIO website, The Biographer’s Craft newsletter, and social media. The prize advances BIO’s mission to reach talented new writers in the genre. The deadline for applications is March 1, 2021.

For further information and application instructions, see https://biographersinternational.org/award/hazel-rowley-prize/#apply

*

Deadline for Submissions February 28, 2021

“Literary [Non-]Fiction in Times of Crisis”, 13th May to the 15th May 2021

(Submission Deadline 2/28/2021)

CRISIS: “a time of great danger, difficulty, or confusion when problems must be solved or important decisions must be made” (OED)

The fall of the Berlin Wall; refugee movements across Europe; Brexit; political populism; divided societies in Europe and USA; or the pandemic of Covid-19 – it is almost unlikely to formulate a complete list of crises that have emerged in recent times. The notion of crisis, however, is by no means confined to the socio-political realm and its grand narratives/grand challenges. Personal, religious and identity crises seem idiosyncratic in essence, but are in reality experiences shared collectively by different cultures and generations. The idea that crises are not only destructive or arresting, but rather necessary for progress and/or self-development is communicated not only by means of historical accounts or political analyses, but also via personal life reviews as well as fictional, literary works. Literary [non-]fiction is, after all, the most multi-faceted medium of communication. Many times the individual’s need for literary (self-)expression is driven by the need to make sense of the surrounding reality [also by highlighting different versions of reality] and contextualize one’s personal, socio-political or environmental crisis. Facing a political/cultural/social/religious predicament, authors are often driven by an imperative to voice their disagreement over transgressions/half-truths/ lies/manipulations, which eventually makes one unable to turn away from the presumed obligation to right a wrong. This is why Nadine Gordimer once said that writing about ‘public policies’ [sensu largo], particularly if their impact on the social fabric is negative, corresponds to writing about morality.

Department of English Literature and Literary Linguistics is pleased to announce its conference, “Literary [Non-]Fiction in Times of Crisis”, to be held online at Adam Mickiewicz University from the 13th May to the 15th May 2021. The conference’s objective is to explore both writerly and non-writerly involvement, analyses and suggestions regarding descriptions of and possible solutions to the ills of a given society/community/individual and collective mindsets. Our intention is to set up an interdisciplinary dialogic space for academics interested in restoring the strength of referentiality in [non-]fiction writing, with the overall aim to make textual reality relevant again. Our invitation is addressed to researchers from various fields of scholarly investigation, including literary studies, culture studies, film studies, identity studies and other interdisciplinary studies.

Suggested topics include but are not restricted to:

SECTION I Socio-Political crisis in texts

Session Chairs: prof. dr hab. Liliana Sikorska [sliliana@amu.edu.pl] and prof. UAM dr hab. Ryszard Bartnik [rbartnik@amu.edu.pl]

* Black Lives Matter

* Wars [culture wars/terrorist extremism]

* Arab Spring [and other ‘revolutions’]

* Minority and human rights

* Brexit

* Political transitions of divided societies

SECTION II Psychological crisis in texts

Session Chairs: dr Katarzyna Bronk-Bacon [kbronkk@amu.edu.pl] and prof. UAM dr hab. Dominika Buchowska-Greaves [drusz@amu.edu.pl]

* Narration and representation of personal or collective trauma

* Crisis of identity and belonging

* Rites of passage in human life [motherhood/fatherhood; middle age/old age, crisis of faith]

* Sexual/gender assault/abuse/asymmetry

SECTION III Environmental crisis in texts [Ecocriticism]

Session Chairs: dr Jeremy Pomeroy [jerpom@amu.edu.pl] and dr Jacek Olesiejko [olesiejk@amu.edu.pl]

* The crisis of Anthropocene

* Climate change

* Pan- and epidemics

SECTION IV ‘Institutional’ crisis in texts

Session Chairs: dr Marta Frątczak-Dąbrowska [mfratczak@amu.edu.pl] and dr Joanna Jarząb-Napierała [joanna.jarzab@amu.edu.pl]

* Crisis of democracy

* Crisis of neoliberalism

* The [re]birth of populism

* Crisis of the state [Truth/Trust/Rule of law]

Authors are encouraged to prepare 20 minute presentations in English. Abstracts of around 300-500 words should be submitted to crisisandliterature2021@amu.edu.pl by the 28th February 2021 [in the event of any technical problems use the alternative email address crisisrb@amu.edu.pl]. In addition, we would like to inform about that the Department of English Literature and Literary Linguistics is planning to launch, presumably in 2022, a postconference publication, in cooperation with Wydawnictwo Naukowe UAM. The full-length papers to be considered for this volume shall be peer-reviewed and must not be under consideration by any other journal or publication.

*

Deadline for abstracts: 27 February 2021

Announcement: Call-for-Papers

This call is for abstracts for a scholarly, international edited collection entitled, Writing Australian History on Screen: cultural, sociological, and historical depths in television and film period dramas “down under”.

Deadline for abstracts: 27 February 2021.

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