Archived Postings

The deadlines have passed for the following listings, or they are notices of new issues of life writing journals. We provide this information here for points of reference for scholars interested in trends in the field.

 

Deadline for Submissions, November 15, 2019

EACLALS Triennial Conference 2020: Transcultural Mo(ve)ments: Memories, Writings, Embodiments

Date: May 18-22, 2020

Venue: Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales

Call for Papers

The influence of postcolonial thought has made it a commonplace to acknowledge the coexistence of multiple and plural forms of modernities that have led to great cultural, political, economic and technological shifts in the twentieth and twenty first centuries.

In the contemporary globalised world, patterns of migration are aided by technology so that movements and mobility are both physical and virtual: ‘hyper-mobility’ and ‘instantaneous communication’, the effects of which can be seen in the exchange of ideas, languages, and cultural and social forms. The influence of “post-national” transnationalism, characterised by a decentring and deterritorialization, can be seen not only in fully braided economies (EU), the internationalisation of wars (NATO), and global collective identities (ISIS) but is also visible in creative forms within circuits of exchange that reveal the blurring of national boundaries, the mixing of traditions, and the transformation of communities and aesthetics.

Transcultural Mo(ve)ments then includes issues of, and tracks shifts among borders, refugees, languages, genders, genres, cultures, and between all sorts of mobilities and interdisciplinarity, among many, many other possibilities. Since the transcultural is often associated with a post-national age, can we still talk of distinct cultures? How do we think of identity without collapsing it into an indistinct homogeny?

This call for papers invites responses that examine how these mo(ve)ments have emerged in postcolonial literary works: how are modes of narration influenced by these transcultural movements? As the very notion of transcultural presumes a decentring of national canons how do transnational narrative forms permeate, blend and destabilise origins? How do they forge new languages and create new forms of representation? Do they formulate a new ethics in a new heterogenous world? What is their relationship to those postcolonial works of literature or narratives that focus on binarities? How have transcultural narratives of migration blurred genres and identities in the postcolonial? What are the expressions of these mo(ve)ments that promote wider planetary approaches? How does the term “transcultural” reverberate in postcolonial Wales?

This conference invites papers that rethink, rejuvenate and regroup postcolonial studies from within a wide array of transcultural frames and do so from a variety of disciplinary approaches, theoretical perspectives, creative and ARTivist expressions.

 

Papers are invited on topics under the following headings:

 

  • Transcultural mo(ve)ments and expressions of the present, the patterns, migrations, subjectivities and imaginaries.
  • The production and reception of narrative forms in these transcultural mo(ve)ments.
  • The expressions of ethical lives in transcultural narratives.
  • Canonicity and transcultural literatures.
  • Transcultural and postcolonial.
  • Narrative modes and genres in transcultural literatures.
  • The linguistic turn in transcultural narratives.
  • Transcultural interventions in the postcolonial.
  • Postcolonial transcultural mo(ve)ments from Indigenous perspectives.
  • Transcultural mo(ve)ments of absence into presence.
  • Transcultural and gender.
  • Transcultural and embodiment.
  • Queer, transcultural and the postcolonial.
  • Transcultural and globalisation.
  • Postcolonial ARTivism within the transcultural mo(ve)ments.
  • ‘Hyper-mobility’ and ‘instantaneous communication’.
  • Transcultural memory.
  • Transcultural mo(ve)ments in postcolonial translation.
  • Transcultural and postcolonial cinema and/or the visual arts.
  • Transcultural and mobility.
  • Transcultural and postcolonial engagements.

 

 

Proposals Deadline Extended: November 15th

Notification of acceptance by December 6th

We invite contributions for 20-minute papers or 90-minute panels addressing the conference topic. Please send a 300-word abstract for individual papers or 450-word abstract for panels, accompanied by a short bionote of all speakers (100-150 words) and 5-6 keywords, to:

eaclals2020@cardiff.ac.uk

For more information please do not hesitate to contact the conveners of the conference:

Radhika Mohanram  mohanramr1@cardiff.ac.uk  and Luisa Pèrcopo percopol1@cardiff.ac.uk

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Deadline for Submissions, November 15, 2019

Stories We Live By: Narrative and Identity. (11/15/2019; 1/20-24/2020) University of Groningen, Netherlands

Dear friends and colleagues,
I would like to draw your attention to an upcoming Winter School, titled Stories to Live By: Narrative and Identity, organized at the University of Groningen. This Winter School should be of interest to graduate students (MA & PhD) and early career researchers with an interest in narrative, as well as artists, professionals, and teachers.
What: A week-long programme on narrative and identity in journalism, sociology, theology, literature, art and other fields and media.
Confirmed speakers: Alberto Godioli, Marina Grishakova, Barend van Heusden, Goffe Jensma, Warda el Kaddouri, Stefan Kjerkegaard, Liesbeth Korthals Altes, Tilman Lanz, Sjoerd-Jeroen Moenandar, Ronald Nikolsky, Rick Peters, Anneke Sools and Margaret Tali.

Where: University of Groningen, the Netherlands (2 hours by train from Amsterdam Airport)

When: 20-24 January 2020

Costs: €375 with or €325 without accomodation

DeadlineBefore or on 15 November 2019

Applications: You can apply here

More information: see the flyer and programme attached, or visit our website
May I ask you to share this message with anyone you think might be interested in applying for the winter school?

Kind regards,

Sjoerd-Jeroen Moenanda

Deadline for Submissions, November 15, 2019

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Deadline for Submissions, November 15, 2019

CALL FOR PAPERS

After(Life) Narratives of #MeToo

A Special Issue of Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly

Guest Editors: Rebecca Wanzo (Washington University in St. Louis) and Carol Stabile (University of Oregon)

Submit: Abstracts of 300–500 words in length by November 15, 2019 to metoolifenarratives@gmail.com.

Stories of sexual violence are shaped and constrained both by the unrepresentable nature of trauma and conventions of medium and genre (Judith Herman 1992; Leigh Gilmore 2001; Saidiya Hartman 2007; Ariella Azoulay 2008). Fictive and real accounts of sexual violence across time and media can also sometimes absorb discourses that decenter or undermine support for survivors and affirm identity-based, nationalist, and conservative discourses (Ida B. Wells 1892; Birth of a Nation; Central Park Five; Sarah Projansky 2001). While personally and politically vital, the politics of recognition that narrating stories of sexual violence enact are complicated by the ways they move across various political projects, locations, and media (S. Smith and K. Schaffer).
The #MeToo movement invites us to rethink the constraints of medium and genre in relationship to disclosures. #MeToo has sought to provide a platform for sharing survivor stories, using the quotidian nature of experiences of sexual violence (from harassment to rape) to force assailants and institutions to reckon with the impact of sexual violence. With limited characters, and in a medium notorious for an alleged lack of nuance, the stories of #MeToo gathered into a powerful collective story that moved beyond the platform, creating perhaps the most massive moment of feminist consciousness-raising since Anita Hill.
This special issue of Biography explores storytelling practices emerging after the the 2017 celebrity re-launch of Tarana Burke’s hashtag #MeToo in 2006, narratives shaped by constraints, but also hinting at possible new genres and disruptions: the elliptical disclosure; the power of the celebrity story and its erasures around race, class, and disability, and other identity categories; the tensions between queer and heteronormative narratives; and the difference national context makes. Most of all, we are interested in contributions that invite us to think about how the medium interacts with these disruptions and the extent to which medium may transform storytelling practices and ways of thinking about sexual violence.

We welcome pieces that engage questions such as:

  • How do fragmented narratives, solidarity narrative practices, generic conventions governed by social movements, legal concerns, silences that have historically been integral to disclosure, and shifts in listening practices change the nature of the story?
  • How do contemporary movements against sexual violence engage with previous traditions of nonfictional representations of sexual violence?
  • What difference do media—and mediation—make in telling and listening to stories of sexual violence—and to who gets to speak and who is heard?
  • Do projects like Aishah Shahidah Simmons’ #loveWITHaccountability challenge conventional wisdom about whose stories about sexual violence can be told alongside each other—both the injured and people who were silent in the face of the injury? How might restorative justice approaches be folded into media storytelling practices?
  • What roles do identities play in the presentation and reception of #MeToo? For example, how have the conventions of queer life narrative storytelling interacted with stories of sexual injury within the community? How have working-class women, like those at the Ford Motor plants in Chicago, been able to share their stories? How should we think about the difference between the kind of #MeToo story invited by Tarana Burke and the stories from predominately white women celebrities that made international headlines?
  • Do narratives of sexual violence linked across people, media, and time disrupt our understanding of single stories of individual injury?
  • How do we map the differences in transnational #MeToo storytelling, with convergences and divergences in #IAmNotAfraidtoSpeak, #BalanceTonPorc, #Cuentalo, #AnaKaman, #YoTambien, #Losha, #MosqueMeToo, or #QuellaVolteChe? Where do we begin to write the history of women’s struggles to form solidarity over histories of sexual violence? What are the challenges and obstacles women face in forging solidarities?
  • How might we historicize this kind of storytelling in relationship to work done either before #MeToo (#MeuAmigoSecreto, #WhyLoiter, et al.) or in the years before Twitter existed, when women used latrinalia and other forms of cultural expression to share the names of rapists and harassers among themselves? How do we place memoirs discussing sexual violence in conversation with these contemporary storytelling practices of disclosure?

We also welcome papers that use multiple media or modes of storytelling to generate new ways of thinking about global movements against sexual violence and their histories of solidarity and resistance. Multi-authored work, interviews, and collaborative projects are welcome.

Please submit 350–500-word abstracts to Rebecca Wanzo and Carol Stabile by November 15, 2019 to metoolifenarratives@gmail.com. Notifications will be sent on December 16, 2019. Articles of up to 10,000 words will be due on June 1, 2020. Biography will arrange for contributors to present papers in workshop format at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa in Honolulu in August 2020.

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Deadline for Submissions, November 8, 2019

 

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Posted November 2, 2019

Hello all

Does anyone on the list know of work on the relationship between autobiography and periodicals in the nineteenth century? All suggestions gratefully received.

Please answer directly, to trev.broughton@york.ac.uk

Trev

Dr Trev Broughton

Reader in English and Related Literature,
Associate, Centre for Women’s Studies
University of York
Part-time (Mondays — Wednesdays)
Office:  Derwent  J 215 b
Co-editor, Journal of Victorian Culture https://academic.oup.com/jvc/pages/Editorial_Board

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Deadline for Submissions, November 4, 2019

Dear IABA List Members,

We are working on our annual annotated bibliography of critical and theoretical work on Life Writing, and before finalizing it, we want to make sure it is as timely, inclusive, and extensive as possible.

So if during the last year (from November 2018 to December 2019) you have published, edited, or co-edited a book, written an article for a journal or an essay for an edited collection, or completed your doctoral dissertation, we would appreciate having that information, so that we can incorporate it into the list. (There is of course a very good chance that we have already included it—we work on this all year!—but this will make sure your work is noted.)

We would request the following information:

·      Full bibliographic information for each text, formatted as per MLA 8
·      A one-sentence annotation per text

We are especially committed to noting publications in languages other than English. If you could provide a translation of the annotation, however, that would be helpful.

We would appreciate getting the information by Monday, November 4. Please send your information to Janet Graham (gabiog@hawaii.edu).

Thanks in advance. This bibliography usually has between 1,400 and 1,500 entries, and represents the most extensive annual critical survey of the field. We want to make sure your work appears within it!

Paige Rasmussen
Managing Editor

The Center for Biographical Research

Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly
1960 East-West Road
Biomed B104
Honolulu, HI 96822
Tel: (808) 956-3774
Find us on Facebook and Twitter!
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Deadline for Submissions, November 4, 2019

VETERAN IDENTITY, ADVOCACY, AND REPRESENTATION 5th Veterans in Society Conference: (11/4/2019; 3/22-24/20120) St. Louis, USA

contact email:

We invite scholars at all levels—including students and those out of academia—to cross national, cultural, historical, and disciplinary boundaries to reflect on the theme of “Veteran Identity, Advocacy, and Representation.”

We encourage and are open to a variety of presentation styles, including but not limited to:

  • Individual Presentations: 75- to 100-word abstract, 250-word proposal
  • Panel Presentation, with 3 to 4 presenters: 150- to 200-word abstract, 750-word 
proposal including potential panelists
  • Poster Presentations, by individual or collaborative presenters (1 poster per 
submission): 150- to 200-word abstract
  • Roundtable Discussion, with 4 or more presenters: 150- to 200-word abstract, 500- 
word proposal
  • Works-in-Progress: back by popular demand, we have scheduled a workshop session specifically for sharing and refining early-stage research and/or engagement projects with kindred scholars and potential collaborators: 500-word proposal (works-in-progress submissions will not undergo peer review)

All submissions should conform to a widely accepted citation style that will be intelligible to an interdisciplinary audience (e.g., APA, MLA, Chicago). Unless otherwise noted (under session type), email proposals must include:

  1. a cover letter providing contact information for the author(s), title, and format of the proposed work,
  2. an abstract attached in a separate file (or sheet of paper).Please respect word counts for abstracts by desired session type. Abstracts must be formatted for blind review: no author names, affiliations, or other personally identifiable information.
  3. Email proposals to vis20@umsl.edu

Visit www.veteranology.org for more details about the conference and the Veterans Studies Association.

The  French Directors Project ‘Portraits de cinéastes’  is currently seeking scholars willing to offer biographical entries both literary and personal on  major French directors (1000 words maximum) for the remaining entries of our publication (see below).  If you are interested in contributing please email: frenchdirectorsproject@gmail.com

 

We look forward to hearing from you,

Dr Michael Abecassis

University of Oxford
Language Centre, 12 Woodstock Road Oxford OX2 6HT England
Marcel Achard

Jean-Jacques Annaud

Jacqueline Audry

Jacques Becker

Claude Berri

Guillaume Canet

Etienne Chatilliez

Patrice Chéreau

Eli Chouraqui

René Clément

Alain Corneau

Louis Delluc

Raymond Depardon

Bruno Dumont

Louis Feuillade

Francis Girod

Jean Grémillon

Robert Guédiguian

André Hunebelle

Benoît Jacquot

Christian-Jaque

Claude Lelouch

Marcel L’Herbier

Tonie Marshall

Claude Miller

Edouard Molinaro

Gérard Oury

Jean-Marie Poiré

Yves Robert

Georges Rouquier

Francis Veber

Ariel Zeitoun

Claude Zidi

 

Contact Info:

Dr Michael Abecassis

University of Oxford
Language Centre, 12 Woodstock Road Oxford OX2 6HT England

frenchdirectorsproject@gmail.commichael.abecassis@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk

 

Deadline for Submissions November 1, 2019
 

American Elegy, Now

deadline for submissions:
November 1, 2019
full name / name of organization:
ALA American Poetry Symposium (Washington DC, February 20-22, 2020)
contact email:

Call for Papers:

If the English elegy consoles through aesthetic substitution (Sacks), and the modern elegy resists consolation and persists in melancholy or rage (Ramazani), then what forms of memory and mourning avail contemporary American elegists? In this moment of heightened division, instability, and violence, how might elegy answer—or fail—the exigencies of life and death in contemporary America?

We invite short talks on the poetry and poetics of mourning for a roundtable discussion, “American Elegy, Now,” at the 2020 ALA American Poetry Symposium. We encourage intersectional approaches, and we especially welcome talks that read American elegy in light of any of the following topics:

  • Environment: climate change; indigenous land rights; water and food chain contamination; anthropocentrism & animal studies

  • Race & Ethnicity: Native sovereignty & tribal recognition; structural racism; the New Jim Crow & the carceral state; public monuments and memorials

  • Gender & Sexuality: trans-, cis-gender, and non-binary women’s elegies; LGBTQIA+ approaches to elegy; disease, illness, mortality, and sex;  responses to the AIDS crisis

  • Disability Studies: mobility impairment; sensory impairment; chronic pain and/or illness; neurodiversity; posthumanism

  • Digital Media: memory and mourning through digital archives, social media, apps, and digital media and online fora

  • Visual Arts: painting, drawing, photography, sculpture, book art; hybrid materials and forms

  • Performance: music, dance, film, performance art

  • Architecture: public and private memorials; funerary statues

  • Fashion: customs of dress; sentimental & mourning jewelry

  • Food: industrial agriculture;  food insecurity

 

Guidelines:

Please send a 300-word abstract, a 100-word bio, curriculum vitae, and current contact information to Drs. Julie Phillips Brown (brownjp@vmi.edu) and Giffen Mare Maupin (maupin@hendrix.edu) no later than 1 November 2019. Accepted participants must submit complete talks (approximately 1500 words in length) by the end of January, 2020.

 

About the 2020 ALA Symposium on American Poetry: The Symposium will take place in Washington, DC, from February 20-22, 2020. Please note that the conference registration fee is $175 (the conference fee covers the costs of the conference, including one meal and three receptions). While ALA membership is not required to participate, all participants must register by February 2, 2020.

For more details on the Symposium, please visit:

https://americanliteratureassociation.org/ala-conferences/ala-symposia/american-poetry/

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Deadline for Submissions November 1, 2019

Call for Papers: 2020 Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association Annual Conference—Biographies Area: Philadelphia, PA (April 15-18, 2020)

The Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association annual conference will be held on Wednesday April 15 through Saturday April 18, 2020 at the Downtown Marriott Hotel on Market Street in Philadelphia, PA. Scholars from a wide variety of disciplines will meet to share their Popular Culture research and interests.

The Biographies Area is soliciting papers that examine the connections between biography and popular culture. Papers and full panel presentations regarding any aspect of popular culture and biography are encouraged. Potential topics might include:

– Biography and entertainment, art, music, theater
– Biography and film
– Biography and criminal justice
– Television programs about biography
– Biography and urban legends
– Biography and folklore
– Biography and literature
– Scholarly Biography
– Controversial Biography
– Psychoanalysis and Biography
– Historical Biography
– Political Biography
– Autobiography

Sessions are scheduled in 1½ hour slots, typically with four papers or speakers per standard session.  Presentations should not exceed 20 minutes. The deadline is November 1, 2019.

Proposals must be submitted on the conference website.

Thank you for your interest!

Please direct any queries to the Biographies Area chair:
Susie Skarl
Associate Professor/Urban Affairs Librarian
UNLV Libraries
Las Vegas, NV 89154

702.895.2141
susie.skarl@unlv.edu OR susieskarl@gmail.com

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Deadline for Submissions Nov. 1, 2019

Call for submissions–MLA Approaches to Teaching Volume on Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (11/1/2019)

Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl is one of the most frequently taught texts—it appears on syllabi for American literature, African American literature, American history, life writing, and gender or women’s studies courses. It is taught in high schools as well as in colleges and universities. Yet, very few resources are currently available for instructors.
Submission are invited, therefore, for a new volume in the MLA’s Approaches to Teaching series on Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl. Proposed contributions should incorporate a clear pedagogical focus. Possible themes could include the literary, social, historical, political, ideological, and cultural contexts of the narrative, comparisons between Incidents and other texts, the reception and publication history of the narrative, the genre of slave narratives, violence and the threat of violence, editorial collaboration, and many others.Interested contributors should first complete the survey available on the MLA’s website:https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/HLVKXJV .Then submit a 500-word abstract as well as a brief c.v. to the editor, Lynn Domina, at ldomina@nmu.edu.Deadline for survey and abstracts: November 1, 2019.
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Deadline for Submissions October 31, 2019

AUTOETHNOGRAPHY AND SELF-STUDY AS EDUCATION RESEARCH METHODS: CONTINUING DEBATES AND CONTEMPORARY AP

AUTOETHNOGRAPHY AND SELF-STUDY AS EDUCATION RESEARCH METHODS:

CONTINUING DEBATES AND CONTEMPORARY APPLICATIONS

 Edited by

Deborah L. Mulligan*, Emilio A. Anteliz# and Patrick Alan Danaher*,+,^

*University of Southern Queensland, Australia

#Central University of Venezuela, Venezuela

+Central Queensland University, Australia

^University of Helsinki, Finland

FOCUS AND RATIONALE

There is recurring and increasing scholarly interest in the ethical and methodological possibilities of autoethnography and self-study as research methods in education (understood broadly and inclusively as encompassing learning and/or teaching in diverse forms and ranging from formal and structured on the one hand to informal and incidental on the other hand). Against the backdrop of that scholarly interest, this proposed edited research book is centred on continuing debates and contemporary applications related to autoethnography and self-study. These continuing debates include the perceived legitimacy and rigour of focusing on the researcher as self, the relationship between that focus and wider conceptualisations of the self and possible opportunities for engaging productively with multiple manifestations of the other and of otherness. These contemporary applications encompass innovative strategies for building on the undoubted affordances of autoethnography and self-study while also addressing their perceived limitations, traversing different disciplines and paradigms, and mobilising inter- and trans-disciplinary and -paradigmatic approaches.

ORGANISING QUESTIONS

Across the range of issues traversed in the book, it is planned that the following organising questions will be addressed:

  1. What are the genealogical origins and the defining characteristics of autoethnography and self-study?
  2. What are the strengths and limitations of autoethnography and self-study as education research methods?
  3. What are innovative and novel strategies for maximising the strengths and minimising the limitations of autoethnography and self-study?
  4. How do debates about and applications of autoethnography and self-study generate new insights into the character and significance of education research methods?
  5. How do autoethnography and self-study resonate with broader advances in theorising and understanding contemporary life and society?
  6. How can autoethnography and self-study contribute to reconceptualising and reimagining the work and identities of current and future researchers?

CALL FOR CHAPTER ABSTRACTS

Abstracts of no more than 250 words are cordially invited as potential chapters for this proposed edited research book. The editors seek submissions that represent a diversity of geographical location, disciplinary focus, and theoretical and methodological approaches, united by a shared focus on the affordances, limitations and possibilities of autoethnography and self-study as productive and potentially transformative education research methods. Please email your abstract and a bionote of no more than 125 words for each chapter author to Deborah.Mulligan@usq.edu.au, emilio.anteliz@gmail.com or Patrick.Danaher@usq.edu.au

Feel free to contact by email with the book editors with any questions regarding the formation of your abstract.

Abstract deadline: 31 October 2019

EDITOR BIONOTES

  1. Deborah L. Mulligan has spoken at a number of academic symposiums in South East Queensland and has presented in state-wide webinars. Her primary research interest resides in the field of gerontology. Her PhD investigated the role of contributive needs when addressing older men and suicide ideation. Deborah has a strong interest in community capacity building as a means of transforming the lives of older adults and combating the negative stereotypes surrounding this demographic. She is also interested in the long-term effects of research on the participants and the ethical implications of investigating marginalised groups. Email: deborah.mulligan@usq.edu.au
  2. Emilio A. Anteliz is a hydrometeorological engineer who for many years coordinated the provision of learning extension programs, projects and courses by the Faculty of Engineering at the Central University of Venezuela in Caracas, Venezuela to professional engineers and related fields. His research interests include environmental movements, engineering education, informal and lifelong learning, and professional ethics. Email: emilio.anteliz@gmail.com
  3. Patrick Alan Danaher is Professor of Educational Research in the School of Education at the Toowoomba campus of the University of Southern Queensland, Australia. He is also currently an Adjunct Professor in the School of Education and the Arts at Central Queensland University, Australia; and Docent in Social Justice and Education at the University of Helsinki, Finland. His research interests include the education of occupationally mobile communities; education research ethics, methods, politics and theories; and academics’, educators’ and researchers’ work and identities. Email: patrick.danaher@usq.edu.au https://staffprofile.usq.edu.au/profile/patrick-danaher
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Deadline for Submissions October 31, 2019
Deadline for Submissions October 31, 2019

Call for Chapters: From Self-Portrait to Selfie: Contemporary Art and Self-Representation in the Social Media Age (10/31/2019)

Website: https://www.mdpi.com/books/pdfview/edition/1083

MDPI Books is currently running an edition entitled “From Self-Portrait to Selfie: Contemporary Art and Self-Representation in the Social Media Age”. 

Defined as a self-image made with a hand-held mobile device and shared via social media platforms, the selfie has facilitated self-imaging becoming a ubiquitous part of globally networked contemporary life. Beyond this selfies have facilitated a diversity of image making practices and enabled otherwise representationally marginalized constituencies to insert self-representations into visual culture. In the Western European and North American art-historical context, self-portraiture has been somewhat rigidly albeit obliquely defined, and selfies have facilitated a shift regarding who literally holds the power to self-image. Like self-portraits, not all selfies are inherently aesthetically or conceptually rigorous or avant-guard. But, –as this project aims to do address via a variety of interdisciplinary approaches– selfies have irreversibly impacted visual culture, contemporary art, and portraiture in particular. Selfies propose new modes of self-imaging, forward emerging aesthetics and challenge established methods, they prove that as scholars and image-makers it is necessary to adapt and innovate in order to contend with the most current form of self-representation to date. The essays gathered herein will reveal that in our current moment it is necessary and advantageous to consider the merits and interventions of selfies and self-portraiture in an expanded field of self-representations. We invite authors to take interdisciplinary global perspectives, to investigate various sub-genres, aesthetic practices, and lineages in which selfies intervene to enrich the discourse on self-representation in the expanded field today.

Ace Lehner, University of California – Santa Cruz (USA)
Editor

The submission deadline is 31.10.2019. You may send your manuscript now or up until the deadline. Submitted papers should not be under consideration for publication elsewhere. Their acceptance will be subject to our regular peer review processes. To check suitability, we encourage authors to send a short abstract or tentative title in advance to the Editorial Office (booksubmission@mdpi.com).

MDPI Books is fully open access. Open access (unlimited and free access by readers) increases publicity and promotes more frequent citations, as indicated by several studies. Open access is supported by the authors and their institutes. No Article Processing Charges (APC) apply for well-prepared manuscripts.

For further details on the submission process, please see the instructions for authors at our website (https://www.mdpi.com/books/publish_with_us).

Contact Email:

 

Deadline for Submissions, October 31, 2019

Travel in Arab Women’s Writings and/or Arab Women’s Travel Writings

I am editing a journal volume, of about six articles, on Arab Women’s Travel Writings, or Travel Writings by Arab Women.

I am seeking original  scholarly papers, not previously published, about travel writings by Arab women. I will also consider scholarly papers about travel, or the theme of travel, in Arab Women’s writings.

Please write to me if you have an idea for a paper on this topic.

Thank you.

Contact Info:

Dr. Nawar Al-Hassan Golley

Professor in Literary Theory and Gender and Women’s Studies

American University of Sharjah

Contact Email:
Deadline–10/31/2019

Deadline for Submissions October 15, 2019

M/C Media/Culture Journal Call for Abstracts – ‘violence’ (15/10/2019)

‘violence’
We often think of violence in its most manifest forms: war, terrorism or massacres at schools. But violence also operates in more subtle forms. Some forms of violence are easily recognised, but others are decontextualised and depoliticised through complex cultural processes of normalisation and denial (Brison). Violence can become a spectacle, an aestheticised representation, or it can be reduced to banality when its horror and trauma is refracted through everyday lives and spaces which are shaped by violent systems and ideologies (Arendt). Notions of trauma, spectatorship, testimony, and witnessing circulate through narratives of violence. Ideas of “civilisation” implicitly and explicitly reference competing discourses of violence and put them to work in damaging ways, often in service of ideals (e.g. liberalism) that mask the very violence that support them. Even for those of us who feel generally safe, violence is all around us, shaping how we live, work, think, feel, and act. However, violence is not equally inflicted or experienced throughout the world. Ultimately, feeling safe is often a marker of privilege and this safety often comes at the price of violence enacted upon others.
This issue invites responses to the theme of “violence,” understood broadly, as it operates through various social, cultural, institutional, and affective domains.
Possible considerations include (but are by no means limited to):

  • Symbolic violence and the discursive, political and social domination that shapes contemporary or historical realities.
  • Pedagogical violence and the operation of power and control over the means of intellectual, social and cultural production in spaces of learning.
  • Physical violence and the attendant damages that this entails.
  • “Cartographies of violence” (Oikawa) and the production of subjectivities, histories and realities through spatial imaginaries (and regulation).
  • The intersections of (racial, colonial, gendered, sexed, ableist) violence and the exclusions that this produces, depends on, and reifies.
  • Political violence in the wake of polarisation.
  • Technological violence and the ways in which media technologies facilitate or resist violence.
  • Violence as a subject of public interest in forms including news media, true crime, and entertainment.

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Release date: 22 Apr. 2020
  • Editors: Janine Gertz, Emma Maguire, Theresa Petray, and Bryan Smith
  • Send us your 150 word abstract proposals as soon as possible, and preferably by 15 October 2019. Full essay deadline to be negotiated with editors but likely by 1 December.

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to violence@journal.media-culture.org.au.
For Author Guidelines see here: http://journal.media-culture.org.au/index.php/mcjournal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Janine Gertz, Emma Maguire, Theresa Petray & Bryan Smith
James Cook University

Deadline for Submissions October 15, 2019

IABA World Turku 2020
Life-Writing: Imagining the Past, Present and Future
9–12 June 2020
Turku, Finland

SELMA: Centre for the Study of Storytelling, Experientiality and Memory warmly welcomes proposals to the 12th IABA World Conference, which will be held at the University of Turku (Finland), June 9-12, 2020. Through the theme of Life-Writing: Imagining the Past, Present and Future, IABA World 2020 will explore the multiple temporalities shaping the dimensions of life storying and life writing research. Temporality impacts the writing and shaping of life narratives, as well as the ways in which we analyze life narrative documents. The temporal is at the core of how we understand the centuries-long histories of how the self is written about and the genealogy of life writing research. Temporality, however, does not mean only gazing to the past, but also understanding how the present moment and orientation to the future are visible in life writing and/or how history makes its presence known in different moments and spaces. The temporal approach also invites us to explore how the future is imagined in life narratives and to discuss our visions for the future of life writing studies.

This interdisciplinary conference encourages dialogues across boundaries of theory, methodology, genre, place, and time. The Conference invites not only traditional conference papers and panels, but also unconventional presentation formats, creative sessions, as well as artistic performances. We encourage cross-disciplinary and transnational contributions. Proposed works may consider life storying through themes including for example:

  • Narrating and imagining life courses (for example childhood, youth, and aging in life writing)
  • Ethics of storytelling
  • Cultural memory and societal change
  • Non-human life storying / Life writing in posthumanism
  • Autobiography, diary, letters, and life writing in historical research
  • The histories and futures of different genres of life writing
  • Digital history and the future of biographical and prosopographical research
  • Sensory and/or Emotive narratives
  • Life storying in popular culture (music, film, theatre, games)
  • Visual life narratives (photography, graphics, visual arts etc.)
  • Hidden/forgotten lives vs. Public/celebrated lives
  • Interrelations: Family and life writing
  • Life storying migrations, displacements, and belongings
  • Life writing illness and wellness / disability and ability
  • Imagining futures in life narratives
  • Life writing and artistic research
  • The histories and futures of life writing studies across disciplinary boundaries
  • Methods, genres, and definitions in life-writing/autobiographical/life story/ego-document research

Submissions:

We invite both 20 minute individual presentations and 90 minute full panel, roundtable, or workshop sessions. We encourage proposed full sessions to be interdisciplinary and international. Creative sessions and performances can also be proposed and if you are uncertain about how to submit these, please contact the organizers: iabaturku2020@utu.fi

The conference language is English.

All presenters must submit a max. 300 word abstract and a 150 word bio.

Please note: when you propose a full session all the presenters must submit their own abstract to the system and mention that it is part of XXX session.

Link to abstract submission:
https://app.oxfordabstracts.com/stages/1230/submission

Abstract submission guidelines:

  • Register to Oxford Abstracts to submit
  • You may amend your submission until the final submission deadline. Please note that uncompleted abstracts will not be reviewed.
  • Remember to complete the abstract and answer all the required questions before the deadline.
  • If you have any questions regarding the submission process, please contact info@aboaservices.fi

Practicalities and schedule:

Deadline for proposals 15.10.2019

Notification of acceptance: 1.12.2019

Registration opens: 1.12.2019 / Early bird fee until: 29.2.2020 / Final registration by: 15.4.2020

The Conference Fee will be ca. 200/150 EUR (early bird), 250/200 EUR (the exact amount will be notified when the registration opens)

Information about publication plans:

The conference team will publish a special issue of Biography in conjunction with the 2020 IABA Turku. Information will be available on the conference website by August.

Conference organizer:SELMA: Centre for the Study of Storytelling, Experientiality and Memory, University of Turku

Conference co-organizers:  Åbo Akademi University, the City of Turku, International Institute for Popular Culture, and the Finnish Literature Society

FAQ:

Individual proposal + panel: traditional academic session with 3–4 participants, 20 min presentation + 10 minutes discussion. In full panel, we propose that the chair is one of the presenters.

Roundtable: 4–6 participants, with short presentations and then questions from the round-table organizers, dialogue between participants and then open discussion from the floor

Workshops, creative sessions, performances:  we are open for suggestions!

Deadline for Submissions October 15, 2019

Special Issue of [Inter]sections onWar and Conflict in North American Autobiographical and Documentary Narratives

Our age is one of refugee crises, of wars where the civilian population is more exposed than ever before, and of terrorist attacks that can produce more victims than organized combat. Today, information about all of these events circulates faster than ever, particularly outside of traditional media outlets.  Witnessing and reporting about destruction has never been easier, and cultural memory and social responsibility are more mobile and more complicated as a consequence. Similarly, at this time, our understanding of categories such as “victim” and “perpetrator” are unsettled by terrorism and the refugee crisis, news stories about American veterans who return home to perpetrate mass violence, as well as revelations about the treatment of war prisoners by the American military, and other human rights abuses within the military itself. In addition to this, memory and representation now circulate not only among cultural and national groups, but also among genres and media, in a constantly shifting hierarchy that is only partly reflected by traditional media. The mobility of memory and the recent growth of its transcultural dimension should have, it seems, worked towards increasing a sense of responsibility towards the fate of the more vulnerable, those who live in warzones or are fleeing conflict areas, but instead the effect seems to be much more ambiguous, as recent political and social developments indicate.

We welcome submissions that examine narratives that memorialize participation in war and conflict in a variety of North American auto/biographical and documentary genres (diary, memoir, autobiography, reportage, documentary film, oral testimony etc.) and media (traditional writing and reporting, but also multimodal media such as comics, video, and digital media etc.) in order to explore the complicated mobility of individual and group memory, as well as the complexities of witnessing, recording, and reacting to one another’s suffering. In a world where the United States is still perceived as one of the main players on the political, military, and cultural scene, as well as an increasingly selective refuge for those fleeing war and conflict across the globe, an analysis of American autobiographical and documentary narratives that bear witness to conflict and destruction (from both within and without US borders) is essential for the understanding of transcultural identity and memory, as well as the narrative patterns through which they are expressed.

This special issue asks questions such as: in the process of memorialization, how are concepts such as grief, trauma, and survival translated across cultures? How can the classification of participants in war and conflict into “victims,” “perpetrators,” “bystanders,” as well as “soldiers” and “civilians” be refined so that it contributes to a better understanding of what makes ordinary people commit evil deeds (Waller 2002)? How do mainstream definitions of concepts such as “genocide,” “heroism,” or “war crime” influence the way people experience and remember war and conflict? What counter memories are produced as a consequence? How do Western tropes of storytelling, suffering, and healing influence the narratives of both American and non-American stories? How do the requirements of a particular genre (such as memoir or documentary film) influence the way certain events are memorialized? What blind spots exist in the memorialization of war and conflict? How does suffering become sellable? Last, but not least, how do gender and sexuality play out in the context of war and conflict?

This special issue is co-edited by Dragos Manea and Mihaela Precup. Please submit all inquiries, as well as full articles to mihaela.precup@lls.unibuc.ro and dragos.manea@lls.unibuc.ro.

[Inter]sections is a double-blind peer reviewed open access journal of American Studies indexed in the MLA Directory of Periodicals, Ulrichsweb, DOAJ, CEEOL, and EBSCO. For more information about us, see www.intersections-journal.com.

We publish academic papers, as well as relevant reviews and interviews. The language of the journal is English (US), so please edit your submission accordingly. Papers should be between 3,000 and 8,000 words (for book reviews, the suggested length is between 1,000 and 3,000 words), and written in accordance with the 7th edition of the MLA citation style. All submissions should also include an abstract, a list of 5-7 keywords, and a short bio.

*

Deadline for Submissions October 15, 2019

Call for Papers
Conference
Auto/Biography and Reputation Politics
February 6 and 7, 2020 at the University of Vienna

Collaboration of Character Assassination and Reputation Politics (CARP) Research Laboratory, George Mason University, Viriginia, and Department of English and American Studies, University of Vienna

In the earliest documents of the genre transmitted from antiquity, biography and its reception are already associated with the creation of positive or negative personal reputations of politicians, artists,
scientists or military leaders. Autobiography, in turn, whetherspiritual since late antiquity or generally secular since the Enlightenment, has also been used to publicly create and negotiate reputations of its narrators and protagonists. The relation of such
reputations created in biography and autobiography to the author figures and historical persons has produced long-standing scholarly and popular
debates in terms of fictionality or nonfictionality, semiotic constructedness, and reliability. In the past decades, however, life writings – including biography and autobiography as much as diaries or letters and, more contemporarily, life narratives and egodocuments in media such as painting, cinema, graphic novels, digital formats andphotography, for example – have been critically discussed in terms of
cultural and national significations, affective patterns,
psychologically and legally coded constructions – relating to trauma studies, witnessing and testimonials – or narratological conventions including perspectives, temporalities or individual and collective memory. The discussion of life narratives and their genre conventions, patterns and protocols as established means of creating and destroying
reputations appears to have met with only minor interest in the field.

At this juncture, Auto/Biography Studies and Reputation Politics Studies might benefit mutually and strongly from an interdisciplinary collaboration. For a range of studies of reputation politics and
reputation management in psychology, communication studies, political sciences and historical science, contemporary methodologies and theories of life writing and life narrative in literary, cultural and media studies provide refined terminologies and tested approaches in respect
of the determining effects of generic and narrative conventions, semiotic materiality and medial intransparency, as well as questions of agency, relationality and network structures; and, reversely, for the study of auto/biography, the recently developed categories and critical methods in the study of reputation politics provide new ways for ethical consideration of life narratives by addressing the creation or destruction of life stories in public.

Through reputation politics studies, as an emerging field that is revitalizing interests of rhetorical studies and political sciences since antiquity, human-rights approaches or memory studies in life writing research, for example, may be further detailed by address to the evaluative strategies behind the creation of specific structures of personalities and narrated characters and lives and, for example, the
seemingly returning attraction in these days of isolating identity images and discourses long considered defunct. The critical discussion of the textually produced relations between the individual and the communal or collective in the age of populist revival and resurging nationalism benefits from the joint address to life narratives and reputation politics. Conceivable for discussion, among others, are the
following questions:

• Has the term reputation lost relevance in the contemporary age of intense and deep mediatization and rapid globalization of life stories and their ever-changing, elusive evaluative reception?
• If processuality and relationality of agencies in production and reception of works of culture as well as the intransparency of the medium have become of guiding interest in contemporary auto/biography
studies, how might the medial production of a reputation be systematically considered in processual terms?
• What is the benefit of the continuing address to the ancient category of character in discussions of ‘character assassination’? Who or what is a character in relation to personality, self, individual, protagonist, narrator, author?
• Has the term reputation become part of an elitist discourse that collides with precepts of the race-class-gender and further categories of cultural-studies critiques? If there is an intersectionality of
reputation, is there a transversality, as well?
• When politicians write autobiographies, how do the self-images created in these autobiographies relate to historiography and biography?
• How are fiction and non-fiction in auto/biography and autofiction as well as their discussion related to reputation constructions and their criticism?
• What are the relations of private and public practices of life writing with reputation building?
• How is the discussion of the mediality of works of auto/biography freshly challenged by consideration of the multimodality of the medial channels and materialities through which reputations are generated and put to political use?
• How does historiography as a genre that is still often determined by descriptions of individual lives and personalities rather than relational perspectives, and as such still committed to its derivation from protocols of biography in antiquity, benefit from the critical combination of methods and theories of Auto/Biography and Reputation Politics Studies?

For a principal orientation regarding the two fields, respectively, and as a common ground for initiation of methodological discussion, we suggest Routledge Handbook of Character Assassination and Reputation Management, ed. Sergei Samoilenko, Martijn Icks, Jennifer Keohane and Eric Shiraev (Routledge, in print, fall 2019), or Samoilenko, Shiraev, Keohane and Icks, “Character Assassination (general)” in The Global Encyclopedia of Informality, ed. Alena Ledeneva (UCL Press 2018)
441–445, and Handbook of Autobiography/Autofiction, ed. Martina
Wagner-Egelhaaf (De Gruyter 2019). Please also see the websites of IABA, the International Auto/Biography Association, and of CARP Research Lab,
https://sites.google.com/ualberta.ca/iaba/home and
https://carplab.wordpress.com.

We welcome interdisciplinary and methodologically explicit papers that address critical questions across an international variety of works, genres, media and practices, with attention to theoretical premises of
both Auto/Biography Studies and Reputation Politics Studies. Conference language will be English. Several publishers, including Macmillan, Sage,
Routledge, and Taylor & Francis, have expressed interest in the publication of a volume comprising the results of the conference. Please send proposals (600 words maximum exclusive of references) plus a short academic biography to nadja.gernalzick@univie.ac.at and eshiraev@gmu.edu
by October 15, 2019. Notice of acceptance will be given by October 30, 2019.

The conference is co-organized by Nadja Gernalzick, Department of English and American Studies, Faculty of Philological and Cultural Studies, University of Vienna, and Eric Shiraev, George Mason University, Arlington, Virginia, U.S.A, with the assistance of Edwina Hagen, University of Amsterdam; Martijn Icks, University of Amsterdam;
Jennifer Keohane, University of Baltimore, and Sergei Samoilenko, George Mason University.
_____________________
Univ.-Prof. Dr. Nadja Gernalzick
Visiting Professor
Department of English and American Studies
Faculty of Philological and Cultural Studies
University of Vienna
Campus, Hof 8.3
Spitalgasse 2-4
1090 Wien
Austria

Campus, Hof 8.3, Room 3E-02-08A
nadja.gernalzick@univie.ac.at

*

Deadline for Submissions October 15, 2019

International Conference on Oral History

8-9 February 2020 – London, UK

organised by

London Centre for Interdisciplinary Research

For decades, oral history was considered less than scholarly, leading to its exclusion from several history books; thus valuable first-hand experiences and information that could alter historical truth were neglected and ultimately lost to oblivion. Our conference wishes to challenge the pervading view that oral testimony can lead to false representation of historical events and underline the significant support it can provide to historical research, especially in lieu of written documentation.

The journey of a memory through time may change, transform or even become distorted from its primary form. Oral testimony requires a multilevel examination and verification so it can be considered legitimate and useful as historical information, but despite these difficulties, oral tradition can have the power to present an entirely new perspective on an event, future generations can then interpret it freely.

The conference will focus on the connections between oral history, collective memory, and individual memory. Whether from a historical, social, or even psychological perspective, we wish to engage scholars in a multidimensional and interdisciplinary approach in order to deeply explore all aspects of this valuable and fascinating area. We are committed to creating a welcoming space for discussion, collaboration, and exploration of oral history’s potential as a tool for local, national and international projects that would enrich and even revise chapters of history.

Conference presentations will be related, but not limited, to:

  • Oral history throughout history
  • Oral historian: a public historian? Oral history as a form of social and communal activity; Promoting oral history and engaging public awareness
  • Conducting oral history research; advantages and disadvantages; limitations and ways to overcome them
  • Archiving oral testimony; examples and presentation of valuable archives
  • Methodologies, techniques and methods in conducting and writing oral history
  • Theories of oral history
  • Re-examining and re-writing history through the lens of oral history; Oral history in the global historical arena
  • The absence of historical facts and the role of testimonies
  • Epistemological and ethical dilemmas in oral history
  • Use and abuse of oral history on the Internet
  • Oral history and the law
  • Cases in which oral testimony changed historical truth
  • Oral history as a form of therapy
  • Collective memory and oral tradition
  • The role of individual memory in oral history
  • Oral history as a revealing or misleading tool
  • Manipulation of memory and the role of oral history
  • Oral history and trauma
  • Oral history in war
  • Oral history in the hands of social scientists
  • Oral history as a tool of revealing/reliving a dictatorship/suppressing regime
  • Altering, exaggerating or forgetting memories; the psychology of a survivor
  • Can individual and collective memory be manipulated in order to present a particular side of an incident?
  • Iconic cases of oral history
  • Why is the oral history project needed? Goals, steps and priorities
  • Oral history in teaching and teaching oral history

The conference will bring together scholars from different fields including history, philosophy, religion, sociology, international relations, literature, art, space studies, peace studies, cultural studies, minority studies, war and/or genocide studies, journalism, immigration studies, psychology and psychiatry, political and social studies, and those working in archives, museums and NGOs.

We are particularly interested in inviting those with first-hand experiences, amateur archivists and memory collectors to participate in our newly established session “Share your memories and change history.”

Submissions may propose various formats, including:

*Individually submitted papers (organised into panels by the committee)

* Panels (3-4 individual papers)

* Roundtable discussions (led by one of the presenters)

* Posters

Paper proposals up to 250 words and a brief biographical note should be sent by 15 October 2019 

For fees and submission information please follow the link: https://oralhistory.lcir.co.uk

Provisional conference venue: Birkbeck, University of London, Bloomsbury, Malet Street, London WC1E 7H

Contact Email:

 

Deadline for Submissions October 15, 2019

Call for Contributions

Semiotics in Cultural Studies/Semiotiken in den Kulturwissenschaften

The collection Semiotiken in den Kulturwissenschaften/Semiotics in Cultural Studies opens a comparative and transdisciplinary discussion on the uses and critical methodology of semiotics in cultural studies.

Histories of cultural studies (Assmann 2017 [2006]; Bachmann-Medick 2016 [2006]; During 2005; During ed. 2001 [1993];  Fauser 2011 [2003]; Marchart 2018 [2008]; Musner ed. 2001; Nünning and Nünning eds. 2008 [2003]; Takahashi 2004; Kittler 2000; and many others) have usually not addressed the provenances of the semiotics employed in diverse cultural-studies approaches or have done so peripherally only. While poststructuralist influences are frequent and noted in cultural studies and imply a recourse to the history of structuralist semiotics of some kind, for example, the semiotic theories and models informing various schools and traditions of cultural studies are hardly critically discussed in terms of the role semiotics take in informing and shaping cultural studies methodologies. When cultural studies are understood as media studies, as they must be from a contemporary semiotic perspective, the need for coherent explications of semiotic assumptions and methodologies in diverse scholarly approaches to cultural products becomes even more felt. While histories and systematics of semiotics  address areas of cultural-studies interest (Posner/Robering/Sebeok 1997–2004), a comprehensive cultural-studies review of semiotics has not
yet been developed. This collection is meant to offer a first stepping stone towards a systematic and critically methodological comparison of the diversity of applications of semiotics in cultural studies by providing, as incentives for a wider discussion, treatments of individual traditions and problematics of semiotics in cultural studies.

Including the semiotics of Charles Sanders Peirce, there have been and are a variety of explicitly semiotic approaches in cultural studies since the late nineteenth century, for example from Ferdinand de Saussure and structuralism to semiotics of culture by Roland Barthes, or from poststructuralism to representationalism (Birmingham School) and the plurality of methods in so-called cultural semiotics (www.kultursemiotik.com). The investigation of visual signs after early iconology (Aby Warburg, Erwin Panofsky) or the diagrams and orders of signs developed for the notation of phenomena in myth studies and early anthropology (George Frazer) also employ diverse semiotic conceptions and methods that have been extended to and are referenced in these days.
How do tenets of Saussurian semiology inform structural anthropology?
When such methods are critically and comparatively studied, the position of discourse analysis after Michel Foucault on the spectrum also has to be investigated: what is historical semantics (Dietrich Busse) in relation to discourse analysis and cultural semiotics? How is the agency of actors, for example after actor network theory (Bruno Latour), integrated in models of signification and what is the semiotics of actor network theory? The models of signification and of actants are as diverse as are the semiotics and semiologies, even if individual areas
of application of semiotics prefer specific models like the notorious use of the differentiation of icon, index and symbol after Peirce in theories of documentary film and photography.

Contemporarily and continuingly, materiality and deixis appear to be important concepts in theories of signs, and the relation of semiotics and media studies is of particular interest in times of a phenomenologization of media studies as in approaches to a “semiotic phenomenology” (Malin Wahlberg) in film studies as well as in new materialism or posthumanism. Elaborations of deconstruction and grammatology, for example in image studies (Sigrid Weigel), call for conceptualizations of principal relationality and differantiality beyond identificatory reductions of signs to referents. Where is the connection of a materialist semiotics in diagrammatics (Matthias Bauer und Christoph Ernst), intermateriality (Andrea Seier) and the materialism of
posthumanism (Cary Wolfe)?

We welcome comparative methodological, theoretical and historical discussions of semiotics, investigations of specific problems in semiotics of cultural studies as well as sample applications of methodologically reflected semiotic approaches in cultural studies.

Possible contributions may address or include, among others, the fields of

semiotics and cultural studies, approaches and examples since the 1880s:
anthropology from James Frazer to Bronislaw Malinowski and Claude Lévi-Strauss; iconology and its extension to image studies, visual culture studies and semiotics of the image; semiotics after Charles Sanders Peirce: pragmatism; semiology after Ferdinand de Saussure: structuralism; …

semiotics and cultural studies, approaches and examples since the 1950s: discourse analysis and dispositives after Michel Foucault, historical epistemology, cultures of knowledge; semiotics of culture after RolandBarthes; grammatology after Jacques Derrida; …

schools and methods of cultural studies and their semiotics:
Frankfurt school (is there a semiotics of the Frankfurt School?);
Birmingham school; postcolonialism; pragmatism; mixed methods and grounded theory; cultural concepts of the body; cultural memory, memory studies; trauma studies; Amsterdam School for Cultural Analysis; actor network theory; posthumanism; relationalism; Linienwissen, Liniendenken;
diagrammatics; new materialism; posthermeneutics; …

transdisciplinary semiotics in cultural studies:
history and theory of art and architecture; media theory, media
philosophy, media ecology; design theory; aesthetics of reception; neurobiology and cognitive science; neuronal networks and artificial intelligence; theater studies, theories of ritual and performance studies; film studies; queer theory; comparative literature; narratology, narrative environments; translation studies; archaeology; historiography; auto/biography and automediality studies; social
semiotics; approaches to multimodality; communication studies; numerology; sound studies; media archaeologies; theory of technics and technology; …

The collection is intended as a bilingual volume, and we accept original contributions in English or German. The collection is scheduled to appear with transcript Verlag, Bielefeld, Germany, in a new series on cultural studies under the general editorship of Kulturwissenschaftliche Gesellschaft (KWG).

Please send proposals (about 400 words) in English or German plus a short academic biography to the volume editors by October 15, 2019: nadja.gernalzick@univie.ac.at and thomasmetten@me.com.

Prof. Dr. Nadja Gernalzick
Department of English and American Studies
Faculty of Philological and Cultural Studies
University of Vienna
Austria

Dr. Thomas Metten
Transfer Center
University of Passau
Germany

with the assistance of

Nora Benterbusch M.A.
Art History and Cultural Studies
European Comparative Media Studies
Saarland University
Germany

Dipl.-Biol. Filip Niemann
Psychiatry and Psychotherapy III
Section Neuropsychology and Functional Imaging
University Hospital Ulm
Germany

New Series (Bordeaux University Press): Contemporary Autobiographical Practices

This new collection publishes original manuscripts (monographs and collective volumes in French or English) that examine :

  • Self-referential narratives, and the way they are published and read (and the increasing role of new technology, more particularly phenomena like blogs or social networks, but also the resurgence of more ancient forms such as diaries)
  • The ontological and psychological dispositions that lead us to tell about ourselves and our lives to others—and the communicational structures entailed­—and their possible pathological or curative dimension.
  • Outstanding contemporary autobiographical ventures (mostly from the anglophone world—Henry Roth, Edward St. Aubyn, Rachel Cusk, Maggie Nelson…—but they can be compared to similar works from other linguistic areas such as Elena Ferrante or Karl Ove Knausgaard) and what they reveal about current publishing policies, formal and aesthetic evolutions and reader responses.
  • Self-representation for commercial purposes (from an author’s picture on a dust cover to authors’ personal websites) or political ones.
  • Self-representation in visual arts (painting, photography, cinema and graphic memoirs).
  • And more generally theoretical approaches to the issue of the fact/fiction border and the line separating self-portrait and self-reinvention.

Our aim is to publish texts by authors who have a good knowledge of contemporary stakes and concepts linked to self-narration, and whose approach is not limited to literature but branches out into other fields (sociology, cognitive sciences, psychoanalysis…) in order to better understand a will, a need—to narrate oneself, to narrate one’s self—intrinsic to human beings.

Edited by Arnaud Schmitt (arnaud.schmitt@u-bordeaux.fr) and Stéphanie Ravez (stephanie.ravez@u-bordeaux-montaigne.fr)

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Deadline for Proposals October 13, 2019

10 PhD fellowships in Life Sciences – Life Writing at Johannes Gutenberg University / University Medical Center Mainz
Starting April 2020, we are offering 10 fully funded PhD fellowships at our interdisciplinary DFG research training group „Life Sciences – Life Writing: Experiences at the Boundaries of Human Life between Biomedical Explanation and Lived Experience“ in Mainz.
Graduates from life sciences and the humanities as well as medicine students are welcome to apply!
Come and join our vivid and interdisciplinary research training group!
Applications are welcome both in German and English.
Application deadline: October 13, 2019
Interviews will take place in calendar week 47 in Mainz.

Prof. Dr. Alfred Hornung
Speaker, Obama Institute

 

Chair, American Studies
Department of English & Linguistics
Johannes Gutenberg University

Jakob-Welder Weg 20

D-55099 Mainz, Germany
+49-6131-3923535
www.obama-institute.com/hornung/
Academia Europaea

Deadline for Proposals October 5, 2019

Call for Papers: Nonfiction Neonarrative: Pushing the Boundaries of the Narratable (10/5/2019; 3/5-8/2020) New Orleans, USA

by Daniel Aureliano Newman, University of Toronto

International Society for the Study of Narrative in New Orleans, USA, March 5–8, 2020

Neonarrative is a term coined by Robyn Warhol (2005) to describe the emerging narratability of socio-cultural processes or events that were formerly unspeakable, unacknowledged or unintelligible—in short, it is the process by which the “narratable” emerges from the “unnarratable” (a term Warhol borrows from Gerald Prince 1988). H. Porter Abbott likewise adopts, in a distinct but not unrelated sense, the term “unnarratable” to describe processes so complex that they “resist representation in narrative form” (Abbott 2009); unnarratable processes include the behaviour of stock markets and subatomic particles, evolution by natural selection, and various statistical or emergent phenomena (Abbott 2008). Though such processes are arguably more resistant to narrative than sociocultural processes, they too may eventually become more narratable, over time, growing familiarity, and the efforts of cultural interpreters (among others, journalists, science popularizers, historians, psychologists, explorers of various kinds). Neonarrative thus extends beyond reversals of the hitherto-unspeakable, into the realm of what once eschewed narrative comprehension altogether. To cite just one example: Richard Dawkins’s figure (or character, if you like) of the “selfish gene” gave significant narrative shape to the processes of Darwinian evolution, which Abbott considers the non plus ultra of the unnarratable (2003).

This panel focuses on how nonfiction might contribute to neonarrative’s replacement or displacement of the formerly unnarratable. Fictive narratives certainly participate in this expansion of the narratable; but nonfiction arguably raises the stakes because its truth-telling imperative clashes to a lesser or greater extent with the counterintuitive, experimental, defamiliarizing (Iversen 2019), strange (Caracciolo 2016) or unnatural (Richardson 2015) techniques required to tell a story that couldn’t be told before. Furthermore, understanding the potential narratability of very complex real-life processes might serve to better counter the simple but powerful narratives that play such insidious roles in public misinformation, propaganda, anti-intellectualism.

The ideal composition of the panel will be three or four papers featuring different forms of nonfiction neonarrative (for example, government reports, history, journalism, medicine, narrative essays, science, thought experiments, travel writing…). I am especially interested in papers that focus on a single narrative device (or a cluster of interrelated devices) and its function, formal and rhetorical effects, and relations to neonarrative. The selected papers will be gathered as a panel proposal for the upcoming conference of the International Society for the Study of Narrative in New Orleans (March 5–8, 2020).

To be considered for the panel, please submit a proposal outlining your paper (max. 200 words) and short biographical note to Daniel Aureliano Newman (University of Toronto, daniel.newman@utoronto.ca) by October 5, 2019.

Panel organizer’s bio: Daniel A. Newman is Assistant Professor (Teaching Stream) in the Faculty of Arts & Science at the University of Toronto. His book, Modernist Life Histories: Biological Theory and the Experimental Bildungsroman, was publishedin 2019 by Edinburgh University Press, and his articles have appeared in journals such as Style, Twentieth-Century Literature, Journal of Narrative Theory, and Frontiers of Narrative Studies.

Dear all,

I am interested in organizing a panel, roundtable, or workshop proposal for IABA Finland, June 2020, on digital methods in life writing studies. I would imagine the digital to be broadly defined, open to any kind of method that it is attempting to think through the affordances and limitations of digital tools for scholarship on life writing, whether that be through the creation of digital collections or archives, computational analysis, mapping, data collection and coding, or some other method. My own contribution would be on work to develop and analyze a textual corpus for early twentieth century US immigrant life narrative. My hope would be for the session to offer examples, in early or more finished stages, alongside critical reflections upon the choice to engage these methods.

Please contact me with interest or questions at rodrigue8@grinnell.edu by September 15. We can decide on what format (panel, roundtable, workshop) would make the most sense based on interest.

Elizabeth Rodrigues, PhD
Assistant Professor, Humanities & Digital Scholarship Librarian
Grinnell College
rodrigue8@grinnell.edu

 

Deadline for Submissions September 15, 2019

CALL FOR PAPERS

Graphic Medicine

A Special Issue of Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly

Guest Editors: Erin La Cour (Free University of Amsterdam) and Anna Poletti (Utrecht University)

Submit: Abstracts of 300–500 words in length by September 15, 2019 to biographygraphicmedicine@gmail.com.

In recent years, Graphic Medicine has emerged as an important movement in changing attitudes to patient experience within the practice of Western medicine. Combining insights from life writing and comics studies, Graphic Medicine texts and scholarship evidence the efficacy of life narrative in the medium of comics for opening up new channels of communication between medical staff, patients, their loved ones, and the community; providing alternative sites for community building among patients and their loved ones in regards to specific conditions and their related treatments; and for educating medical practitioners about patient experiences within healthcare systems. Graphic Medicine also provides new opportunities for life narratives to be coaxed, collected, and published for the benefit of the wider community and for the education of medical professionals.
This special issue of Biography will bring comics practitioners and other artists who work within the field of graphic medicine and/or life writing together with scholars of graphic medicine, life writing, and comics to examine the rise of Graphic Medicine as a discourse and practice, and to consider its possible futures, limits, sites of expansion, and the challenges it may face in offering alternative perspectives on the lived experience of health, illness, and healthcare systems, and their attendant discourses.

The guest editors welcome proposals for scholarly articles and comics on any of the following topics:
The graphic in Graphic Medicine: Can Graphic Medicine help overcome stigmas regarding the body, affective states, and psychological responses associated with different forms of illness and disability? What are the possible limit cases for telling personal stories of illness, health, and death in Graphic Medicine? What role do images play when Graphic Medicine texts attempt to narrate experiences associated with healthcare—such as specific procedures, side effects, or elements of recovery—that may go against social and cultural norms of “good taste”?
Ethics: What ethical questions are raised when artists tell the stories of others in Graphic Medicine? What questions emerge when a patient’s illness story necessarily involves telling the stories of others?
Fictionality: Is there a role in Graphic Medicine for fictive stories of patient experience? Why might practitioners turn to invention and fictionality to tell true stories of health and illness? Does fictionality open up different avenues of critique of medical discourses and practices?
Mediality and terminology: Must the term “Graphic Medicine” only apply to life narratives about health and illness told in comics? Can personal zines, visual artworks, documentaries, live performances, site-specific installations, blogs, Twitter, and other forms of multimodal or intermedial life writing also be included under the banner of “Graphic Medicine”? How might current theorizing about what Graphic Medicine is and does change if other cultural forms were included in its rubric?
Graphic Medicine and disability studies: How do the principles, ideas, and practices of Graphic Medicine intersect with the field of critical disability studies?
Graphic Medicine and diversity: Can the focus on the experiences and expectations patients have when interacting with institutions and procedures in Graphic Medicine expand the recognition of and respect for bodily and psychological difference and neurodiversity within the medical establishment? Does this potential for increased recognition of diversity create a tension with the medical discourses that underpin the provision of healthcare and treatment?
Graphic Medicine and epistemology: What alternative forms of care and healing does Graphic Medicine need to address? Does it offer a means for communicating the importance and efficacy of non-Western and Indigenous practices?
Graphic Medicine and intersectionality: Can Graphic Medicine offer new insights into effects of race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, class, and age in informing access to the provision of healthcare? How might Graphic Medicine address the discourses that structure the scene of encounter between patient and medical staff and shape how patients’ experiences are interpreted?
We are interested in papers and articles that explore Graphic Medicine from creative practitioner and scholarly perspectives, and which may take the form of original artwork in comics or other text-image combinations, as well as more traditional scholarly formats.

Please submit 350–500-word abstracts or proposals for creative works to Erin La Cour and Anna Poletti by September 15, 2019 to biographygraphicmedicine@gmail.com. Notifications will be sent by November 15, 2019. Articles of up to 10,000 words or creative works of up to 10 pages in draft form will be due March 1, 2020, and will be workshopped prior to the International AutoBiography Association (IABA) world conference in Turku, Finland, June 9–12, 2020. Biography will reimburse workshop participants for accommodations.

*

Deadline for Submissions September 10, 2019

Performing Joan: Interpreting the Maid on Screen, on Stage, and in the Streets (9/10/2019; 5/7-9/2020) Michigan USA

Call for Papers sponsored by The International Joan of Arc Society/Société Internationale de l’étude de Jeanne d’Arc

International Congress on Medieval Studies (ICMS 2020)
May 7 to 10, 2020
Western Michigan University

Joan of Arc continues to captivate filmmakers, most recently Bruno Dumont, whose headbanging heroine mixes medieval and metal in Jeannette: The Childhood of Joan of Arc (2017) and Joan of Arc (2019). Joan has also made a Broadway comeback via three recent productions: David Byrne’s rock musical Joan of Arc: Into the Fire (2017) the 2018 revival ofShaw’s Saint Joan, and Jane Anderson’s Mother of the Maid(2018)Participatory street theater such as Orléans’ yearly Fêtes de Jeanne d’Arc or the procession’s campier New World cousin, a Joan-themed carnival parade in New Orleans, also shape the Maid’s evolving legacy.

This panel seeks papers that explore the origins, processes, and reception of Joan in performance. What performative aspects characterize the primary documents that inspired subsequent retellings of Joan’s story? Why do certain patterns emerge in Joan’s onstage and onscreen afterlives? And how do different authors and actors approach the creative task of communicating Joan’s relevance to new audiences? What purposes do these performances serve for those who conceive of or take part in them? Finally, how are the productions that Joan inspires received?

Please submit a 250-word proposal for a 15-minute presentation. Proposals should have an abstract format written in Word doc and be accompanied by a brief academic bio (or a CV), including email address, current affiliation, and title/name. Please submit all relevant documents by September 10, 2019 to Scott Manning (scottmanning13@gmail.com) and Tara Beth Smithson (tbsmithson@manchester.edu).

Preliminary inquiries and expressions of interest are more than welcome.

*

Deadline for Submissions September 1, 2019

Departures and Arrivals: Women, Mobility and Travel Writing (9/1/2019) Special Issue–Feminismo/s

Feminismo/s, from the Institute of Research in Gender Studies from the University of Alicante, is currently accepting submissions for its 36 issue, entitled “Departures and Arrivals: Women, Mobility and Travel Writing”. This issue seeks to approach women travel writing from a transhistorical and transnational perspective. Thus, we encourage submissions that deal with travelling and mobility in women’s writing from different cultural and national backgrounds and periods.

We are particularly interested in contributions that explore the intersections between gender, mobility and identity, including, but not restricted to the following aspects:

 

–       Religious or spiritual pilgrimages.

–       Transatlantic and transnational experiences.

–       Exploratory journeys and pioneering experiences.

–       Sea narratives, air narratives, railway experiences and road trip experiences.

–       Travelling in/to/from war zones.

–       Diasporic experiences.

–       Enforced migration and refugee experiences.

–       Uprootedness and in-between identities.

–       Ecocritical approaches to travelling.

–       Tourism and neo-colonial experiences of travelling.

–       Travelling and the cyber-world.

–       Mobility and ableism.

Submitted abstracts should be between 300 and 500 words in length, and should be sent to the issue co-editors by no later than 1 September 2019. Please also include an additional biographical statement, of no more than 100 words, that lists your educational level, current academic affiliation, previous publications and any other details you may feel are pertinent.

Applicants can expect to hear back about their proposals by 1 October 2019. Full articles (9,000 words) will be due by 1 February 2020. Notifications about acceptance or required changes will be provided in July 2020, and final articles will be required on 1 September 2020. Contributors must follow the journal’s editorial guidelines and style.

Should you have any further questions, do not hesitate to contact the issue co-editors, Sara Prieto (sara.prieto@ua.es) and Raquel García-Cuevas (r.c.garcia@kent.ac.uk).

Feminismo/sis an Open Acces Journal and is indexed in the following databases: Proquest (Gender Watch), DOAJ, REDIB, InDICEs-CSIC, ERIH PLUS, MLA, CIRC, MlAR, Latindex, Dialnet, Ulrich’s, Dulcinea, Google Scholar, SHERPA/RoMEO, RUA, DICE, REBIUN, RESH, OCLC WorldCat, Copac, SUDOC and ZDB/EZB.

Deadline for Submissions September 1, 2019

Jenny Diski: A Celebration

A Symposium, University of Oxford, 7th April 2020

Keynote Speaker: Blake Morrison

Jenny Diski sadly died in 2016, and the time is right for a celebration of her work.

Diski wrote in many genres, from novels and short stories, to memoirs, travel narratives, and books on human-animal relationships and the 1960s. She was also a prolific reviewer, who contributed regularly to the London Review of Books. Diski herself, though, refused to classify her writings: ‘Something about the distinction between being a fiction and a non-fiction writer distresses me’, she declared, ‘So I think of myself as a writer. Period’. And it is as a writer, first and foremost, that Diski is appreciated by her many admirers. No reader of hers can fail to be dazzled by her style, or struck by her formal playfulness and innovation.

Yet, perhaps owing to her refusal to be confined by boundaries, Diski has tended to slip under the radar, or between the gaps, in academic discussions. This symposium seeks to bring her to the fore by recognising that it is precisely her difference from what we might expect that makes her so exciting, and by drawing together the many aspects of her work. How, for instance, does Diski extend our understanding of life writing, autofiction, and travel literature? How does she explore the individual mind and social institutions? Is it right to think of her as a Jewish writer, and how does Jewishness figure in her work? What do we make of her provocative interrogations of gender and sexuality? It is hoped that by addressing questions such as these, with a close attention to literary form, this celebration of her work will help to place Diski where she belongs: as one of the most important writers of our time. Period.

We welcome papers on topics including, but by no means restricted to:

  • Diski as a life writer: autofiction, memoir, autobiography.
  • Diski as a Jewish writer.
  • Illness narratives and the cancer diary.
  • Family relationships.
  • Feminism and women’s writing.
  • Travel and travel literature.
  • London.
  • Formal innovation.
  • Humour.
  • Sexuality and the erotic.
  • Diski as a literary critic and a film critic.
  • Journalism.
  • Diski’s significance as a public intellectual.
  • Psychoanalysis and psychiatry.
  • Human-animal relationships.
  • Diski and her times.
  • Diski’s politics.
  • Diski and postmodernism.

Please submit a short abstract (200-300 words) for a 20 minute paper to Dr Ben Grant (benjamin.grant@conted.ox.ac.uk) by 1st September 2019.

Contact Info:

Dr Ben Grant (University of Oxford)

*

Deadline for Submissions August 23, 2019

The ACLA 2020 conference will take place at the Sheraton Grand Hotel in Chicago on March 19-22.
The Panel titled ” 27 Rue de Fleurus.”
Individuals interested in participating in a particular seminar are encouraged to be in touch with the organizers over the summer; paper submissions through the portal will open August 31 and close September 23.

Organizer: Yu Min Claire Chen

yuminclaire@gmail.com

” Paris was the place that suited us who were to create the twentieth-century art and literature. Picasso once remarked I do not care who it is that has or does influence me as long as it is not myself.” (Gertrude Stein)

The post-war generation has been depicted as the lost generation, but it was also a time of vibrant cultural exchange between the US and Europe. Walking into the 27 rue de fleurus in the 1920s, you would see Gertrude Stein’s Saturday evening salon, where the most prominent modernist writers and artists met.

Among them included Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ezra Pound, Guillaume Apollinaire, Sinclair Lewis, James Joyce, Juan Gris, Sherwood Anderson, Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, and many others. In 1933, Gertrude Stein published her autobiography, The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, writing about her years in Paris, Ernest Hemingway also wrote A Moveable Feast, and Woody Allen directed a film Midnight in Paris about life around the Salon. The panel solicits papers that delve into the richness of cultures, arts, music, and literature of this period and probe into cross-cultural influences of writers and artists’ works.

Topics include but are not limited to the following: ·

* Autobiography and memoir studies ·
* Arts and Literature ·
* Expatriates ·
* The Lost generation ·
* The Jazz Age ·
* Avant-Garde

 

Further Update on IABA Website, from Julie Rak

Hello Everyone,

Sorry, posted the wrong link for the 2020 CFP. Here is the one that
works: https://sites.google.com/ualberta.ca/iaba/calls-for-papers?authuser=0

Thanks all!

Take care, Julie Rak

Julie Rak
Professor, Department of English and Film Studies
University of Alberta
Humanities Centre 3-5
Edmonton, AB T6G 2E6, Canada
ᐊᒥᐢᑿᒌᐚᐢᑲᐦᐃᑲᐣ (Amiskwacîwâskahikan), Treaty 6/Métis Territory

Website: https://sites.google.com/ualberta.ca/julie-rak/home

Update on IABA Website, from Julie Rak

Hello IABA friends and fans,

Thanks to all organizers for the IABA Europe and IABA Americas sections for excellent conferences. I’m writing to let you all know that the Call for Papers for the 2020 IABA World conference to be held in Finland is now on the IABA web site. Please have a look, and share it widely with your colleagues beyond life writing studies. The Conferences section of the site is now updated–we can look forward to an IABA Asia-Pacific CFP soon, I hope!

https://sites.google.com/s/0B3LGuUnUnOHfR1VuSG5VNWx3VWc/p/0B3LGuUnUnOHfSF9HT0dBdVlaYUk/edit
Take care, Julie Rak

Julie Rak
Professor, Department of English and Film Studies
University of Alberta
Humanities Centre 3-5
Edmonton, AB T6G 2E6, Canada
ᐊᒥᐢᑿᒌᐚᐢᑲᐦᐃᑲᐣ (Amiskwacîwâskahikan), Treaty 6/Métis Territory

Website: https://sites.google.com/ualberta.ca/julie-rak/home

*

Newsletter Biography Institute

August 2019 (PDF-version)

Richard Hoving will defend his thesis on Josef Kotalla
October 24, 14.30 hrs., Richard Hoving will defend his biography of Josef Kotalla in the aula of Groningen University. During the Second World War, Kotalla was an executioner at Amersfoort prison camp. De Beul van Amersfoort. De biografie van Josef Kotalla will be published by Prometheus publishers. The project was supervised by prof. Hans Renders and dr. Hinke Piersma.

Biography Institute hosts research seminar Biography & History
The course will be given by members of the Biography Institute during the first semester of the next academic year. For more information about enrollment (also for contract students) and the content of the seminar, see the flyer and the section Courses on the website of the Biography Institute.John A. Farrell writes biography Edward Kennedy Edward Moore Kennedy (1932-2009) was the youngest of three brothers who played instrumental roles in the landmark movements for social justice and the struggle for progressive, active government which transfused American politics in the 20th century. Farrell has written biographies of House Speaker Thomas ‘Tip’ O’Neill and U.S. President Richard Nixon. The project will be supervised by prof. Hans Renders and prof. Doeko Bosscher.

Frisian Biography Institute
There will be a Frisian Biography Institute. The aim of this initiative is to forge a cooperation, under the auspices of the Biography Institute of the University of Groningen, between different Frisian organizations, that should lead to an independent Frisian Biography Institute. With this initiative, boardmembers Bert Looper (Tresoar), Hans Renders (Biography Institute RUG), Steven Sterk (Bornmeer|Noordboek) and Geart de Vries (Historisch Centrum Leeuwarden) hope to mobilize other cultural organizations in Friesland to establish a widely supported institute, providing supervision of biographies of Frisian people. Follow this link for more information.

More information can be found on the website www.biografieinstituut.nl.
For subscribing to and unsubscribing from this newsletter, please email biografie.instituut@rug.nl

 

Deadline for Submissions August 18, 2019

Dying and Death in 18th-21st Century Europe, International Conference (ABDD11)

On behalf of the Scientific and Organizing Committee, we are very pleased to invite you to attend the eleventh edition of “Dying and Death in 18th-21st Century Europe, International Conference” (ABDD11), which will take place, as always, at the “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba Iulia, Romania, between 26th and 28th September 2019.

With its unique friendly atmosphere, our interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary conference offers an excellent opportunity for academics, experts and practitioners from diverse fields such as history, sociology, anthropology, psychology, medicine, literary studies, theology, or architecture to network and to share knowledge, experiences and research findings on a variety of themes concerning death and dying, such as the followings:

  • challenges of grieving in a digital age
  • old and contemporary meanings of the ‘good’ death
  • ageing well, dying well and their reverses
  • death, dying and the postmodern search for meaning
  • the great equaliser and the socioeconomic inequalities in dying
  • death and dying within the entertainment industry
  • dreaming, theorising and designing immortality today
  • the rise of the undead in movies and game industry
  • the art and rituals of photographing the dead nowadays
  • (not so) changing attitudes towards death
  • new theories and ideologies of death
  • cultural memory and the landscapes of death
  • death anxiety and the promises of new age movement
  • the dying brain: mind, identity, agency
  • medicalization and de-medicalization of death
  • suicide and capital punishment in times of ‘happiology’
  • enduring ethical challenges of organ donation
  • personal narratives of death and dying

Those interested are invited to submit a proposal of roughly 250-300 words, followed by 3-5 key-words, no later than August 18, 2019 to both mrotar2000@yahoo.com and adriana.teodorescu@gmail.com. Please include also a short bio of yourself, indicating your academic title/affiliation, research interests, significant publications etc. Authors will be notified of the abstract acceptance by August 25, 2019.

Selected papers could be considered for publication in a collective volume or in an international journal.

As our tradition demands, the karaoke show will be part of this edition too.

You will find more details here: http://death-studies.ro/abdd11/.

Contact Info:

Adriana Teodorescu

Associate Lecturer
Babeș-Bolyai University

 

Deadline for Submissions August 15, 2019

HISTORIES OF DEATH

AN INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM

University of Turku, Finland

February 19–21, 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS

Our understandings of death come with long and complex histories, shaped by culture, place, time, power, and identities. Historical analysis allows us to better understand the paths that have led to the recent move toward “death positivity,” and the popularity of death doulas, “death cafes,” alternative and ecological burial solutions, and new understandings of grief. The interdisciplinary and rapidly growing field of Death Studies raises awareness about how we die and mourn, and the ways social factors – class, migrant background, and gender, among them – can result in unequal access to “good death” in many countries and communities today. This International Symposium seeks to delve into the many varied and interwoven Histories of Death to further explore the traditions, ideologies, and institutions that shape our experiences with death.

Death sets people into action, caring for the dying, the deceased, and the grieving in ways that range from the intimate to the professional. The Histories of Death Symposium invites researchers to share their work and engage in dialogue about the different ways people have approached dying, death, and mourning from everyday, cultural, and structural perspectives. The symposium calls for papers, posters, and creative works that may analyze:

  • the social and everyday histories of death
  • histories of death in the context of migration(s)
  • narratives and/or life writing of death and mourning
  • histories of emotion and mourning
  • sensory and corporeal histories of death and mourning
  • childhood and family histories of death
  • health, gerontological, and palliative care histories
  • art and craftwork in histories of death
  • methods and ethics for the study of death in history.

Proposals across times and places are welcome. Though the focus is on death and mourning in historical contexts, the symposium is particularly interested in exploring inter/transdisciplinary approaches, and scholars from all backgrounds are welcome to participate.

Please email abstracts of 250 words, indicating whether you are proposing a paper presentation, poster presentations, or creative work, together with a max. 150-word bio, including name, institutional affiliation and position, and email address, to historiesofdeath@gmail.com by August 15, 2019. Information about registration, featured speakers, travel, and accommodation will be posted shortly on the Symposium website.

The Symposium is hosted by the John Morton Center for North American Studies at the University of Turku’s Department of Philosophy, Political Science, and Contemporary History. The Symposium in funded by the Academy of Finland.

Call for Book Proposals: Practicing Oral History

The Routledge book series Practicing Oral History is accepting proposals for new titles on applied oral history. Series editor Nancy MacKay will be at the Archives* Records conference in Austin, Texas, August 1-7 and happy to meet in person to discuss your book idea. Contact Nancy at nancymackay@gmail.com for a detailed prospectus or to discuss your project.

The series is devoted to applied oral history. Books should address one of three approaches to oral history: best practices for a specific stage or skill within the oral history life cycle, oral history adapted to a specific professional community, or using oral history to achieve a specific goal.

Contact Info:

Nancy MacKay

Series Editor, Practicing Oral History (Routledge)

Contact Email:
Deadline for Submissions August 1, 2019

Dying and Death in 18th-21st Century Europe, International Conference (ABDD11) (8/1/2019; 9/26-28/2019) Romania

On behalf of the Scientific and Organizing Committee, we are very pleased to invite you to attend the eleventh edition of “Dying and Death in 18th-21st Century Europe, International Conference” (ABDD11), which will take place, as always, at the “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba Iulia, Romania, between 26th and 28th September 2019.

With its unique friendly atmosphere, our interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary conference offers an excellent opportunity for academics, experts and practitioners from diverse fields such as history, sociology, anthropology, psychology, medicine, literary studies, theology, or architecture to network and to share knowledge, experiences and research findings on a variety of themes concerning death and dying, such as the followings:

  • challenges of grieving in a digital age
  • old and contemporary meanings of the ‘good’ death
  • ageing well, dying well and their reverses
  • death, dying and the postmodern search for meaning
  • the great equaliser and the socioeconomic inequalities in dying
  • death and dying within the entertainment industry
  • dreaming, theorising and designing immortality today
  • the rise of the undead in movies and game industry
  • the art and rituals of photographing the dead nowadays
  • (not so) changing attitudes towards death
  • new theories and ideologies of death
  • cultural memory and the landscapes of death
  • death anxiety and the promises of new age movement
  • the dying brain: mind, identity, agency
  • medicalization and de-medicalization of death
  • suicide and capital punishment in times of ‘happiology’
  • enduring ethical challenges of organ donation
  • personal narratives of death and dying

Those interested are invited to submit a proposal of roughly 250-300 words, followed by 3-5 key-words, no later than August 1, 2019 to both mrotar2000@yahoo.com and adriana.teodorescu@gmail.com. Please include also a short bio of yourself, indicating your academic title/affiliation, research interests, significant publications etc. Authors will be notified of the abstract acceptance by August 10, 2019.

Selected papers could be considered for publication in a collective volume or in an international journal.

As our tradition demands, the karaoke show will be part of this edition too.

You will find more details here: http://death-studies.ro/abdd11/.

Contact Info:

Adriana Teodorescu

Associate Lecturer
Babeș-Bolyai University

 

*

Dear Reader,

On behalf of the editorial board of the European Journal of Life Writing, we are very happy to announce that the EJLW has published the first 28 articles of its eighth volume, which is now available at

https://ejlw.eu/index

Since the end of 2018, the European Journal of Life Writing is no longer published by the University Library of the VU Free University in Amsterdam, but by the University of Groningen Press.

We are very grateful to the people of the Library of the VU Free University, who have very skilfully and kindly helped and guided us when we first started our Journal. At the same time we are very happy to join the collection of interesting scholarly journals published by the no less skilful, helpful and kind staff of the University of Groningen Press at Groningen University, who have expertly remodelled the lay-out of the EJLW and introduced a new version of OJS (Open Journal System).

Please note that the European Journal of Life Writing is an open-access, scholarly e-journal, which is not funded by any governmental or other organisations. To support the ongoing work of the Journal, please visit https://ejlw.eu/donations. We are most grateful for any kind of financial support.

Another possibility to support the Journal is by purchasing a hard copy of the Festschrift we made for Philip Lejeune on the occasion of his 80th birthday. A copy can be bought for € 30 (Libraries: € 50).If you have any questions about submitting an article or about donating money to the Journal, or if you would like  buy a copy of the Festschrfit, please contact the journal managers Monica Soeting (m.soeting@xs4all.nl) or Petra van Langen (ptvanlangen@gmail.com).Thank you very much for your support!

On behalf of all the editors of the European Journal of Life Writing,

Petra van Langen and Monica Soeting

*

Dear all,

I am interested in organizing or joining a panel proposal for IABA Finland, June 2020. For my own paper, I plan to present research on how the future (near, distant, and unknown) is imagined in diaries and letters written by Jews in France during the Second World War. I envision a panel on the future in diaries and letters – genres generally seen as positioned in the present. Alternatively, the panel could explore different temporalities in diaries and letters written in extreme circumstances (i.e. war and genocide). Please contact me at roseau_ka@mercer.edu.

Katherine Roseau, PhD

Assistant Professor of French

Mercer University

 

Deadline for Submissions July 31, 2019

Call for Applications: How to Approach Biographical Research? – Workshop for Young Scholars (7/31/ 2019; 11/30/2019) Warsaw, Poland

The days when historical biographies had been reserved for life pictures of “great men” and – to a lesser degree – “great women” have long passed. Since then, many outstanding studies have demonstrated the enormous potential of either individual or group biographies, or biographical approach for historical research.

Biographical approach can provide insight into the way people thought and felt in the past, make us aware of the complexity of political and personal decisions and also of the scope for action of individuals in historical situations. It has a special place in the Jewish studies, since it allows to research and analyse complex identity choices. Similar processes also affect other ethnic and/or religious. However, it is also useful to scholars dealing with migration studies, social history and history of ideas.

In order to assist young scholars with biographical research projects and to provide them with a friendly space to discuss research questions and problems, the POLIN Museum invites early career scholars and especially PhD students to participate in a one-day workshop on 30 November 2019 in Warsaw. The workshop precedes the conference “Biographies and Politics. The Involvement of Jews and People of Jewish Origin in Leftist Movements in 19th and 20th Century Poland” (1-2 December 2019), jointly organized by the POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews, the Aleksander Brückner Center for Polish Studies, the Center for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, University of Oxford and the UCL. The participants of the workshop are expected to also attend the conference.

Interested early career scholars and PhD students are invited to submit the completed application form to: geopconference@polin.pl.
The working language of the workshop will be English. Additional reading skills in Polish, Yiddish or German will be a plus.

Participation in the workshop is free of charge. The POLIN Museum will cover the costs of accommodation and meals during the Workshop and the subsequent conference. Participants without institutional funding may apply for a travel grant.

Deadline for application: 31 July 2019.

The workshop is organized within the Global Education Outreach Program.

The workshop was made possible thanks to the support of Taube Philanthropies, the William K. Bowes, Jr. Foundation, and the Association of the Jewish Historical Institute of Poland. 

The workshop was made possible thanks to the support of the European Association for Jewish Studies.

Contact Info:
Contact Email:

Deadline for Submissions July 21, 2019

Call for Abstracts–Workshop “Non-Sites of Memory and Their Witnesses: The Testimonies of the Holocaust by Bullets”(7/21/2019; 9/23/2019) Krakow, Poland

The Research Center for Memory Cultures at the Faculty of Polish Studies of the Jagiellonian University and the Yahad – In Unum association kindly invite you to the workshop

Non-Sites of Memory and Their Witnesses: The Testimonies of the Holocaust by Bullets
23 September 2019, Krakow, Faculty of Polish Studies at the Jagiellonian University

More than 2 million Jews and tens of thousands of Roma were killed by German units in the occupied territories of Soviet Union and Poland between 1941 and 1944, in numerous executions across hundreds of villages and towns. This method of murder by special firing squads has come to be known as the “Holocaust by bullets”. The executions took place on the outskirts of human settlements, in fields, woods or swamps, in the view of neighbors, and sometimes with their complicity. Now, most these killing sites are invisible: unmarked and unmemorialized, overgrown and littered, repainted, demolished and repopulated. They are specific non-sites of memory: non-remembered but also unforgotten by the local communities, characterized by an ambiguous, unsettling status. In order to locate and recognize these sites, we need memory of eyewitnesses to the events that happened there. These witnesses, who are becoming harder and harder to find, have in most cases spent their entire lives next to the killing sites, yet nobody asked them to tell their story. They are our last link to the difficult heritage of the dispersed Shoah.

The Research Center for Memory Cultures at the Faculty of Polish Studies of the Jagiellonian University and the Yahad – In Unum association kindly invite students enrolled in master’s and doctoral programs as well as early career researchers to the one-day workshop dedicated to the non-sites of memory and their witnesses.

The French organization Yahad – In Unum, founded in 2004 in Paris by Father Patrick Desbois, researches the “Holocaust by bullets” in Central and Eastern Europe by collecting video testimonies of the eyewitnesses to the Shoah and identifying the killing sites. Until today, Yahad – In Unum has gathered almost 6,500 accounts and created the biggest collection of Holocaust bystanders’ testimonies. The Research Center for Memory Cultures – within the research project dedicated to the unmemorialized sites of genocide (supported by the National Program for the Development of Humanities), led by Prof. Roma Sendyka – has researched on sites of this kind and their impact on local communities for three years.

The workshop (held in English) will have an open, seminar-like structure and will engage its participants in work with both archival documents and video testimonies related to killing sites. It will take a multidisciplinary approach to the sites of the dispersed Shoah and the testimonies of the eyewitnesses to the genocide. We will discuss the following issues: How to locate and identify a killing site; How to interpret archival documents related to them; How to find eyewitnesses and interview them; What is the relevance of space where an act of witnessing takes place as well as the language and gestures of a witness; How do the bystanders’ testimonies differ from the survivors’ accounts; Can only humans be witnesses; How to use eyewitnesses’ testimonies in transmitting the knowledge about the Shoah to the next generations; How do history (and oral history), sociology, as well as memory, cultural and performative studies help us understand video testimony; How was the Holocaust by bullets possible?

After the workshop, the participants are invited to a lecture by Father Patrick Desbois, the founder of the Yahad – In Unum. The lecture will open the two-day international conference (24–25 September) “Sites of Violence and Their Communities: Critical Memory Studies in the Era of the Post-Human”, featuring, among other guests, Prof. Ewa Domańska, Prof. Caroline Sturdy Colls, Prof. Erica Lehrer and Dr. Bryce Lease.

Applications, consisting of a 1-page CV and a short description (no more than 500 words) of the applicant’s research relevant to the topic of the workshop, should be submitted before 21 July 2019 to the address memorycultures@gmail.com. Notifications will be sent via email by 31 July 2019. Any questions regarding the workshop should be directed to the aforementioned email address.

The organizers will provide catering during the workshop as well as accommodation for the night of 23/24 September.

The organizing team are Dr. hab. Roma Sendyka, Aleksandra Szczepan, Dr. Kinga Siewior and Dr. Karina Jarzyńska from the Research Center for Memory Cultures, Patrice Bensimon and Michał Chojak from Yahad – In Unum and Dr. Stanley Bill from the Faculty of Modern & Medieval Languages of the University of Cambridge.

Contact Email:

 

Deadline for Submissions July 15, 2019

The Research Center for Memory Cultures at the Faculty of Polish Studies of the Jagiellonian University and the Yahad – In Unum association kindly invite you to the workshop

Non-Sites of Memory and Their Witnesses: The Testimonies of the Holocaust by Bullets

23 September 2019, Kraków, Faculty of Polish Studies at the Jagiellonian University

More than 2 million Jews and tens of thousands of Roma were killed by German units in the occupied territories of Soviet Union and Poland between 1941 and 1944, in numerous executions across hundreds of villages and towns. This method of murder by special firing squads has come to be known as the “Holocaust by bullets”. The executions took place on the outskirts of human settlements, in fields, woods or swamps, in the view of neighbors, and sometimes with their complicity. Now, most these killing sites are invisible: unmarked and unmemorialized, overgrown and littered, repainted, demolished and repopulated. They are specific non-sites of memory: non-remembered but also unforgotten by the local communities, characterized by an ambiguous, unsettling status.

In order to locate and recognize these sites, we need memory of eyewitnesses to the events that happened there. These witnesses, who are becoming harder and harder to find, have in most cases spent their entire lives next to the killing sites, yet nobody asked them to tell their story. They are our last link to the difficult heritage of the dispersed Shoah.

The Research Center for Memory Cultures at the Faculty of Polish Studies of the Jagiellonian University and the Yahad – In Unum association kindly invite students enrolled in master’s and doctoral programs to the one-day workshop dedicated to the non-sites of memory and their witnesses.

The French organization Yahad – In Unum, founded in 2004 in Paris by Father Patrick Desbois, researches the “Holocaust by bullets” in Central and Eastern Europe by collecting video testimonies of the eyewitnesses to the Shoah and identifying the killing sites. Until today, Yahad – In Unum has gathered almost 6,500 accounts and created the biggest collection of Holocaust bystanders’ testimonies.

The Research Center for Memory Cultures – within the research project dedicated to the unmemorialized sites of genocide (supported by the National Program for the Development of Humanities), led by Prof. Roma Sendyka – has researched on sites of this kind and their impact on local communities for three years.

The workshop (held in English) will have an open, seminar-like structure and will engage its participants in work with both archival documents and video testimonies related to killing sites. It will take a multidisciplinary approach to the sites of the dispersed Shoah and the testimonies of the eyewitnesses to genocide. How to locate and identify a killing site; How to interpret archival documents related to them; How to find eyewitnesses and interview them; What is the relevance of space where an act of witnessing takes place as well as the language and gestures of a witness; How do the bystanders’ testimonies differ from the survivors’ accounts; Can only humans be witnesses; How to use eyewitnesses’ testimonies in transmitting the knowledge about the Shoah to the next generations; How do history (and oral history), sociology, as well as memory, cultural and performative studies help us understand video testimony; How was the Holocaust by bullets possible?

After the workshop, the participants are invited to a lecture by Father Patrick Desbois, the founder of the Yahad – In Unum. The lecture will open the two-day international conference (24–25 September) “Sites of Violence and Their Communities: Critical Memory Studies in the Era of the Post-Human”, featuring, among other guests, Prof. Ewa Domańska, Prof. Caroline Sturdy Colls, Prof. Erica Lehrer and Dr. Bryce Lease.

Applications, consisting of a 1-page CV and a short description (no more than 500 words) of the applicant’s research relevant to the topic of the workshop, should be submitted no later than 15 July 2019 to the address memorycultures@gmail.com. Notifications will be sent via email by 31 July 2019. Any questions regarding the workshop should be directed to the aforementioned email address.

Organizers will provide catering during the workshop as well as accommodation for the night of 23/24 September. In some cases, travel grants may also be secured for the workshop’s participants.

The organizing team are Dr. hab. Roma Sendyka, Aleksandra Szczepan, Dr. Kinga Siewior and Dr. Karina Jarzyńska from the Research Center for Memory Cultures, Michał Chojak from Yahad – In Unum and Dr. Stanley Bill from the Faculty of Modern & Medieval Languages of the University of Cambridge.

*

Life Writing, Volume 16, Issue 3, September 2019 is now available online onTaylor & Francis Online.

This new issue contains the following articles:is now available online onTaylor & Francis Online.

This new issue contains the following articles:

Articles

The Personal is Political. Self-enunciation Strategies in Italian Second-wave Feminism
Walter Stefano Baroni
Pages: 329-344 | DOI: 10.1080/14484528.2018.1469615
Reading Phoebe Gloeckner’s A Child’s Life and Other Stories at the Time of #MeToo
Olga Michael
Pages: 345-367 | DOI: 10.1080/14484528.2018.1507416
Sites of Servant Memory in the English Country House: Frederick Gorst and the Gladstone Vase
Ellen O’Brien
Pages: 369-384 | DOI: 10.1080/14484528.2018.1564216
Orality, Text and Witness in the Early Work of Tony Parker
Simon Featherstone
Pages: 385-396 | DOI: 10.1080/14484528.2018.1522494
Essays
Writing an Illness Narrative and Negotiating Identity: A Kuwaiti Academic/Author’s Journey
Shahd Alshammari
Pages: 431-438 | DOI: 10.1080/14484528.2018.1514240
Evoking the Female ‘Asexual’: Narrating the Silenced Self
Aoife Sadlier
Pages: 439-461 | DOI: 10.1080/14484528.2018.1510288
Hawai‘i Jungle Writing: Where There is the Most Life
Stewart Manley
Pages: 463-475 | DOI: 10.1080/14484528.2018.1470444
Reviews
Memory Work: The Second Generation
by Nina Fischer, London, Palgrave Macmillan Memory Studies, 2015, 262 pp., ISBN: 978-1-137-55761-2
Marta Bladek
Pages: 479-482 | DOI: 10.1080/14484528.2017.1361781
Constance Maynard’s Passions: Religion, Sexuality, and an English Educational Pioneer, 1849–1935
by Pauline A. Phipps, Toronto, University of Toronto Press, 2015, 304 pp., ISBN 9781442650336
Angharad Eyre
Pages: 483-486 | DOI: 10.1080/14484528.2017.1368104
Burying Autumn: Poetry, Friendship, and Loss
by Hu Ying, Cambridge, MA, United States and London, Harvard University Asia Center, 2016, 365 pp., ISBN 9780674737204
Jessica Siu-yin Yeung
Pages: 487-490 | DOI: 10.1080/14484528.2017.1383844
Love and Liberation: Autobiographical Writings of the Tibetan Buddhist Visionary Sera Khandro
by Sarah H. Jacoby, NY, Columbia University Press, 2014, 456 pp., ISBN: 978-0-231-14768-2
Julia A. Galbus
Pages: 491-492 | DOI: 10.1080/14484528.2017.1388944
Amalie Christine Jencken. 1785 to 1878. From Estonia to Ireland to Australia and Inbetween
translated by Victoria Moessner, New York, Page Pub. Co., 2016, 654 pp., ISBN 978-1-68348-887-3
Pamela S. Saur
Pages: 493-496 | DOI: 10.1080/14484528.2017.1406772
The Philosophy of Autobiography
edited by Christopher Cowley, The University of Chicago Press, 2015, 242 pp., ISBN 9780226267920
Julian Baggini
Pages: 497-501 | DOI: 10.1080/14484528.2018.1511203

Journal of Modern Life Writing Studies
No.12, Spring 2019
Center for Life Writing, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China

CONTENTS
Editor’Note
Special Section: Interview
The Biographer’s Art: Interview with Richard Holmes……Tang Xiumin
Special Section: The Study of Shen Congwen’s Life Writing
The Affectionate Paintings: On Shen Congwen’s Letters in His Later Years…….Liang Qingbiao
Living beyond the Suffering by Constructing the Self: The Selection in the Writing of Congwen’sAutobiography……..Ding Qianhan
Theory Studies
Experimenting on Biography:The Poetic History and Artistic Reality in Nabokov’s Literary Biography……..Jia Ying
The Generic Dilemma and Breakthrough: Taking David Lodge’s Biographical Novels as an Example…….Cai Zhiquan
Peritexts in David Lodge’s Author, Author, and A Man of Parts: From the Perspective of Genette’s Theory of Paratexts ……..Chen Wenyu
Perfect Autobiography……..Mao Xu
Comparative Biography
Into the Complex Soul: Features of Su Manshu Biography……..Mu Jiangwei
Text Studies
Biography As Travel Writing:A Study of George Morrison’s An Australian in China
  ………Zhang Wenru  Cui Yaxiao
The Identity Discourses in Lisa See’s Family Memoir On Gold Mountain: A Family Memoir of Love, Struggle and Survival………Chu Fumin
TheLife Narrative Examined from the Perspective of Space Theory:The Case of Fang Wei’s A Biography of Wang Xiaobo……..Wang Buxin
History of Life Writing
On the Contribution of the Periodicals in the Republican Period to Chinese Modern Biography ………Chen Hanying  Yu Yang  Yu Zhanghua
The May Fourth New Culture Movement and Chinese Modern Biography……..Xu Jingpin
“Literature of Necessity”: On the Utility of the African Slave Narrative…….Zheng Chunguang
The Relationship between the Sage Biography and the Local Chronicles……..Li He
Subject Study
42, a Fatal Age: A New Clue to the Enigma of Gogol…….Xu Xiaoyu
Book Review
The Princess’s Diary and the Princess Diarist: A Review of The Princess Diarist by Carrie Fisher……..Li Xiaolong Wang Mengjie
Film Biography
Looking at Film Biography from the Perspective of Performance Framework…..Zhou Qianwen
Female Intellectuals’ Media Writing in Feminist Films:A Comparative Studyof theHannah Arendt andThe Golden Era……Yang Shihua()
Academic Info
2018 Life Writing Workshop: A Dialogue among the Biographer, the Scholar and the Reader: A Report……Shao Yi
Instructions to Contributors
From the Editor

Instructions to Contributors

Mission
Life writing studies have moved onto the central stage in the academia and gained ever more attention both in and outside China. As the first scholarly journal in the field of China, the biannual journal Modern Life Writing Studies intends to fill up the blank of life writing studies in China, provide a venue for scholars all over the world, attract and promote specialists in the field.
Aiming to keep abreast of the cutting edge of life writing research, Our journal seeks to, in modern views and perspectives, explore various topics of life writing in China and in the world, with almost 20 sections included, such as Interview, Comparative Biography, Theory Study, History of Life Writing, Text Study, Autobiography Study, Diary Study, Subject Study, Film Biography, Book Reviews, Life Writing Materials, From the Life Writer, etc.
Ever since its appearance in 2013, our journal has been well-received by scholars at home and abroad and fundedby a steady grant from Shanghai Jiao Tong University. It is exerting increasingly greater influence in academia with a due wide positive response. In 2017, our journal was included in CSSCI (Chinese Social Science Citation Index), and listed in the international academic literature or included in the annual annotated bibliography by world prestigious universities.
Our journal accepts both Chinese and English submissions. All the articles will be subject to anonymous peer review.

Style
Submissions are welcome from both Chinese and international researchers. Simultaneous submissions are not accepted. English papers should be between 4,000 and 7,000 words of text in length (including notes), while English book reviews are about 2,500 words. Full-length articles take up most part of the journal, but short essays with originality and fresh ideas are also welcome.

Submission Guidelines
All written submissions should be formatted according to the eighth edition of MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. All submissions should include a 100-word abstract both in Chinese and English, keywords (less than 5), a 70–word biographical statement, and works cited. Please adhere to the following requirements:
•   Double spacing, Times New Roman, 12–point font
•   One-inch margins
•   Only Microsoft Word doc or docx files will be accepted
•  Citations should be provided in parenthetical reference followed by “Works Cited”.
•  Endnotes are preferred if there are any.

Submissions should be emailed in Word format to the editor sclw209@sina.com. Each contributor will get two complimentary copies once his/her paper is published.

Our journal is based at SJTU Center for Life Writing. We welcome suggestions and proposals, from which we believe our journal will surely benefit.

From the Editor
–To Our Young Contributors

This issue features an interview with the British biographer Richard Holmes, who is highly esteemed not merely in Europe and America, but also enjoys wide reputation in China for his biographies of Romanticists, notably Shelley, and scientists and his theoretical works on biography. As a professor of Biographical Studies, he excels in summarizing his rich writing experience, as demonstrated in the interview. For instance, “Good biographies…are obviously so varied in style, approach and temperament that it would be difficult to define any essential common ground between them. Nonetheless, I think the ability to fall in love with your subject, and out of love again where necessary, is probably fundamental to the writer of any good biography.” This calls our attention to the very key of biographical writing.
This issue witnesses the special section “The Study of Shen Congwen’s Life Writing”, which includes two papers. Shen has long remained the focus in the academic community, while the interest in him has extended from his fiction to a great variety of other genres, including his life writing. Liang Qingbiao has conducted a research on Shen’s letters after 1949, dubbing them as “the affectionate paintings.” Through the analysis of the readiness, tranquility and thoughts in them and the perception of the “tender beauty of his soul ,” Liang produces a role model in an aesthetic research on autobiography. Based on the knowledge of Shen’s works, Ding Qianhan identifies Shen’s selection of both his adolescent images and his experience periods in the autobiography through a perusal of the first edition of Congwen’s Autobiography and the comparison with the works before and after it. This is attributed to “living beyond the suffering by Self-construction” through her exploration of Shen’s spiritual world.
All the four papers in Theory Study are concerned with the innovation to auto/biography. Since the origins of modern biography, efforts have been constantly made to break free of fetters of conventional boundaries and to establish new forms. For example, the Russian American writer Vladimir Nabokov breaks biography conventions which tend to be prosaic style and linear narration, integrates different genres into the text,interpret the subject’s life or explore his/her mind with the subject’s work. With four of his works of different types, Jia Ying conducts an in-depth analysis of Nabokov’s concepts on truth, history, and his biographical pursuit.
Since the publication of Orlando by Virginia Woolf in 1928, some Anglo-American authors have made every efforts to integrate biography with novels for over a century. Biographical novel is a genre of major influence in recent years, typified by David Lodge’s Author, Author, and A Man of Parts. Two papers focus on the two works. Cai Zhiquan argues that the biographical novel embodies the elements of biography, novel and literary criticism and crosses non-fiction, fiction and literary research. He suggests that this genre enjoys equal status to biography and is a new pattern of life writing. Chen Wenyu analyzes the peritexts in the two biographical novels and discovers that they reduce the distance between the author and the reader. These two papers are complementary to each other.
When it comes to the field of autobiography, Mao Xu designs a “perfect” autobiographical structure, i.e. Perfect Autobiography to regulate the autobiographical form. The Structuralist approach to autobiography in late 20th century is based on the discovery of various models. Mao employs three-act movie theory to propose the model of “well-made auto/biography.” The term “well-made” is borrowed from drama theory of western Europe in the 19th century. Can it be transplanted to autobiography? Mao only puts forward his hypothesis and this value lies not in practical terms but in thought-provoking effect, as does Structuralism for the generic models it designs.
In History of Life Writing, two of the four papers focus on Chinese modern life writing, a hot researchfield. Few researchers are, however, interested in biography in periodicals in China’s Republican Period. “On the Contribution of the Periodicals in the Republican Period to Chinese Modern Biography” is a brilliant paper coauthored by Chen Hanying, Yu Yang and Yu Zhanghua, who refer to a great number of Republican periodicals for a vast collection of biographical works and data. Their painstaking collation, assortment and comments have injected new momentum into the research on Chinese modern life-writing history. Xu Jingpin examines the development of Chinese modern biography and concludes that it is an echo of and a tribute to the New Cultural Movement. The May Fourth New Cultural Movement exerted profound impact on Chinese modern biography in terms of themes, content and literary forms. Meanwhile, the appearance of modern biography was also a driving force to the spread of literary revolution and promoted the top-down cultural enlightenment. The two papers materialize a better understanding of Chinese modern life writing on a micro and a macro scale respectively.
Through his research on African slave narrative, a special sub-genre in the history of American life writing, Zheng Chunguang identifies it as a literature of necessity, which plays an essential role in the history and real life of African Americans. Li He explores the “sage biography” in ancient China and argues that they are not the equivalent of the chronicles despite all the connections and similarities. The two papers alert readers to the fact that many fields and details are still neglected in the study of life-writing history.
The three papers in Text Study are conducive to the reading and interpretation of three influential biographies. George Morrison’s An Australian in China documents his travel in China in 1894. Through an analysis of Morrison’s writing approach of “biography as travel writing,” the paper co-authored by Zhang Wenru and Cuiyaxiao argue that the author focuses on people rather than the scenery and holds no biases but writes about whatever he saw in an objective way. The success of this travel writing has not only reversed his fate but leaves his imprint on history. Chu Fumin’s paper on On Gold Mountain: A Family Memoir of Love, Struggle and Survival examines Chinese Americans’ appeal in ethnicity, politics and gender from the perspective of the biographer’s identity discourses. Wang Buxin’s analysis of Fang Wei’s A Biography of Wang Xiaobo restores the biographer’s writing mode in different cultural spaces to improve our understanding of Wang Xiaobo.
In the section of “Subject Study,” Xu Xiaoyu’s “42, a Fatal Age” is an interesting paper, in which he discovers that Gogol die at the age of 42, recurring in three of his works. From this new clue to solve “the enigma of Gogol,” Xu discovers that it is associated with such themes as love and marriage in Gogol’s works and reveals the sexual psychology in his unconsciousness. This conclusion may be controversial, but Xu is well versed in close reading, reminding us of what is advocated by Leon Edel the great biographer, “The method I am proposing for biography is related to the methods of Sherlock Holmes and also to those of Sigmund Freud.”
There are also a few other intriguing papers. In the section of “Comparative Biography,” Mu Jiangwei’s “Into the Complex Soul” conducts a comparative research on over 30 Su Manshu biographies and highlights the complex character of the poet subject whose singularity is most distinctive. The section of “Book Review” meets an essay co-authored by Li Xiaolong and Wang Mengjie who review Carrie Fisher’s autobiography from the perspective of the translation of the book’s title, i.e. the princess’s diary or the princess diarist. The buildungsroman theme is commented in a succinct and refreshing style.
Two papers are concerned with film biography. Zhou Qianwen employs the “performance framework” to examine the shift from textuality to performance, while Yang Shihua compares two film biographies of female subjects respectively directed by two female film makers from China and Germany. He reveals the differences in material selection, narration, form and content. Both papers arrive at the theory based on the analysis of a specific text.
“Life Writing Workshop: A Dialogue among the Biographer, the Scholar and the Reader” was co-hosted in Nanjing by Shanghai Jiao Tong Universityt Center for Life Writing, and Nanjing University of Finance and Economics at the end of 2018. Shao Yi provides a detailed coverage on this workshop in the section of “Academic Info.” Any of your advice concerning our future workshops is welcome and highly valued.

Ever since our journal was founded, the body of our contributors has undergone a fundamental change. The percentage of young contributors, particularly doctoral candidates, is continually on the rise and reaches up to nearly a half. Therefore, we would like to deliver a few words to young scholars:
You are welcome to contribute to our journal, young friends! As a young discipline, life writing studies provides an open arena for you to bring your potentials into full play. You have brought new blood to our journal, as well as new momentum, topics, concepts and perspectives. Your papers are highly appreciated.
Nonetheless, we have two suggestions to you. Up till now the vast majority of submissions from young scholars address literary biography. It is true that modern biography finds its origins in literary biography, e.g. autobiography of Yu Dafu, Shen Congwen, Hu Shi and Guo Moruo in China and Boswell’s Life of Johnson and The Confessions of Jean Jacques Rousseau in the West. To the extent that literary biography is an essential sub-genre of life writing and it has no much difficulty to access to the writers’s materials, it is understandably easy to research on the genre. But We must also remeber that biography enjoys a broad range and large varieties. Take the example of the Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography, a great number of winners and finalists owe their success to their biography of heavy-weight historical figures and historical biographies seem to be most applauded by readers. It is universally acknowledged that life writing can never be amputated from its context and life writing studies are no intelligence games in the ivory tower. Hence, we support your research on excellent literary biography, but it is more desirable to expand your horizons.
Our journal advocates a rigorous and truth-seeking style of writing. We are expecting to see submissions in compliance with academic standards, free of minor errors in such fields as abstract, keywords, translation, length of quotes and full text, coherence, etc. These standards are not difficult to meet with. Improvement in these respects will mean less unnecessary burden on the part of the journal and more chance for the acceptanc of your paper. Thank you!

January, 2019

Deadline for Submissions June 21, 2019
Herstory Re-Imagined:
Women’s Lives in Biographical Fiction and Film16-17 December 2019
Centre for Life-Writing Research, King’s College London, UK
Convenors: Julia Lajta-Novak (Vienna) and Caitríona Ní Dhúill (Durham)
www.herstory-reimagined.net
Call for Papers
How do the lives of historical women become the raw material of novelists and filmmakers? This conference addresses the current boom in biographical novels and biopics about women’s lives, encompassing a broad conception of ‘woman’ that includes queer and trans life narratives. Figures as diverse as Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine, poet Sylvia Plath, surgeon James Miranda Barry, painter Artemisia Gentileschi, and actress Jiang Qing are the subjects of fictions in various formats and degrees of literary ambition, while pilot Amelia Earhart, stateswoman Margaret Thatcher, blues singer Bessie Smith, and first lady Jackie Kennedy – to name just a very few – have been prominently re-imagined on the silver screen. The conference examines the contemporary repackaging of historical women’s lives in narrative genres, exploring possible connections and tensions between these stories and earlier feminist perspectives on ‘herstory’ and women’s (in)visibility.Scholars of biofiction and film have drawn attention to the ways in which biographical novels and biopics are implicated in the construction of female subjectivity, while the field of life-writing research has seen a rise of interest in questions of gender identity. This conference aims to bring studies of biofiction and biopics into close dialogue with gender-sensitive approaches to biography, so as to shed light on the interactions between life writing, fiction, and dynamics of gender. We are particularly interested in papers that rigorously consider the theoretical questions at the heart of this conference: How do fictions and films about historical women relate to, or challenge, existing theories of women’s biography or gender-sensitive approaches to life writing? What common parameters are available to narrate women’s lives, and how can these be historicised? What does the fictional element contribute to (or subtract from) the image generated of the subject in relation to previous representations? What is the ideological thrust and broader cultural function of these narratives? And how do these re-imagined herstories trouble or confirm the sex-gender systems within and against which they operate?Topics may include, but are by no means limited to, …
  • Notable women in cultural memory: exemplarity and ideological functionalisation of the protagonist/s; if representations of past lives tell us more about views of femininity at the time of their production than in the biographee’s life-time, what need does a novel or film fulfil in its respective present? What narrative/filmic strategies render visible the location of the fiction within a specific culture of gender?
  • Genre and gender: What generic features distinguish biographical or fictional/filmic representations of historical women (plot model, typical features/ motifs/ representational modes)? To what extent do these corroborate or unsettle gendered subject positions? What understandings of life writing, and particularly women’s lives, are encoded in the genres? (e.g. experimental, clichéd, genre fiction, self-reflexive approaches, spot-light approach, collective biography etc.)
  • Postcolonial theory and intersectional approaches: how is the depiction of female subjectivity in biopics/ biographical novels inflected by other categories such as ethnicity, class, or age?
  • Female biopics/ biofiction in the marketplace: the mass-market demand for “real lives”; biofiction/biopics and literary/film awards; biographical fiction and film as media of gendered celebrity culture, commodifying women’s lives for public consumption
  • Reception: What processes of identification are at work in the reception of biofiction/ biopics? How can theories of affect and empathy help to illuminate these? What can reviews of biopics/ biofiction tell us about the discursive construction of gender identity via different modes of reading/ watching biographical fiction and film?

Keynote speakers:Prof. Diana Wallace, University of South WalesDr. Belén Vidal, King’s College London& reading by acclaimed novelist Patricia Duncker

Conference language:English.

Deadline: Please email your proposal (250w) and a brief bio note (80w) to Julia.Novak@univie.ac.at*by 21 June 2019.

Notifications: 23 August 2019.

Selected contributions will be considered for inclusion in a peer-reviewed collection or special journal issue.

* With the submission of your proposal you consent that any data you submit will be saved by the organisers until the end of 2019. Your email will be used for the limited purpose of informing you about updates and news relating to the conference and will not be passed on to any third parties.

*

Deadline for Submissions June 15, 2019

Veterans: Enduring, Surviving, and Remembering War

An International Conference

12-13 September 2019

U.S. Naval War College

In 2018, the University of Massachusetts Press launched “Veterans,” the first academic book series devoted to the postwar lives of military personnel and the enduring human consequences of war. To celebrate its launch, series editors Brian Matthew Jordan and J. Ross Dancy invite individual paper and full panel proposals for a two-day conference, to be hosted by the U.S. Naval War College, exploring veterans in history. In keeping with the goals of the series, the conference aims to build connections and foster conversations between disparate historiographies. As such, we invite historians who work on any time period or conflict to submit proposals. Paper and panel topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Veterans as custodians of historical memory
  • Veterans as historians, relic collectors, and autobiographers
  • Veterans and their struggles for benefits and recognition
  • Medical and disability histories of veterans
  • Veterans and politics
  • Transitions to peacetime and civilian life
  • Veterans and posttraumatic growth
  • Veterans’ fraternal organizations and culture
  • Veterans’ relationships with families and children
  • Veterans’ relationships with other generations of veterans
  • The socioeconomics of veteranhood
  • The experiences of women veterans
  • Veteranhood and race and/or ethnicity
  • Veterans in historical memory
  • Veterans engagement in and relationship to anti-war activism
  • Methodologies for exploring veterans in history

Individual paper or full panel proposals must be submitted by 15 June 2019 and include an abstract of 300 words and one-page curriculum vitae for each presenter. Panel proposals should include a brief statement about the thrust of the session and must include a chair. All proposals including panel proposals should be submitted as single .pdf files.

Submissions and inquiries should be addressed to:
Dr. J. Ross Dancy
Email: jeremiah.dancy@usnwc.edu

Contact Info:

Dr. J. Ross Dancy

*
Deadline for Submissions June 14, 2019

Diva: Hip-Hop, Feminism, Fierceness (6/14/20109; 7/17/2019) UK

The shift from the margins to the mainstream has occurred simultaneously, over the last few decades, for two groups that now jointly exert a central influence over contemporary culture and politics: female r’n’b and hip-hop artists, and feminist thinkers and activists. The coming together of these two groups and sensibilities has redefined contemporary popular music (in all senses of musics of black origin), and wider culture and politics, in the West – from the banlieues to the White House, from Black Lives Matter to #MeToo, from Betty Davis to Neneh Cherry, TLC to Aaliyah, Alicia Keys to Iggy Azalea, Beyonce to Ariana Grande, and all points in between.

The symposium will seek to address this ongoing development, within the scope of exploring the origins of this shift, its resultant successes and failures, its social activism and relationship to “Black Capitalism”, its identity politics and LGBTQ+ components, its saints and sinners and controversies old and new, and its oppositions to, and recuperations by, the establishment, in African-American and Afro-European contexts, and beyond.

The symposium will culminate with a rare opportunity to view the documentary “Aaliyah Live in Amsterdam”, introduced (and with a Q&A) by its director, Dr. Pogus Caesar: “In 1995, Windrush Productions gained exclusive access to the Amsterdam leg of Aaliyah’s European tour. As well as capturing live footage of the concert, Aaliyah and her late father agreed to be interviewed, in a series of intimate conversations, they speak openly about her musical influences, achievements hopes and dreams. The film captures a star in their ascendancy. As the story unfolds it provides fans with a rare insight into Aaliyah, and leaves us wondering how much she would have achieved had her life not been tragically cut short.” Trailer: https://youtu.be/en99KwuxzC8

The symposium will open with a keynote lecture by Dr. Kirsty Fairclough (Associate Dean, Research & Innovation, Schools of Arts & Media, University of Salford): “I Slay: Beyonce as Intersectional Feminist, Activist and Diva”.

Information on further invited guests, and booking details, to follow.

Proposals for presentations (individual and panel) and interventions should be emailed to Dr Benjamin Halligan (b.halligan@wlv.ac.uk) by 14 June 2019. (Word format, 200-300 words, minimal formatting, including biog note and contact information). Areas to be considered can include (but are not limited to) all music-related matters identified above, the evolution of the figure of the diva, trans cultures and fierceness and diva-ism, media around diva superstars (documentaries, tabloid exposes, MTV and post-MTV music videos, star identity formations, intimacy and interviews), confessions and hagiographies, and all other cultural practices that resonate with this development (fine arts, poetry and literature, DJ cultures and dance, film and television), and the protean nature of feminism, and black feminism, and second to third waves of feminism, that have arisen.

The symposium, which is hosted by the Centre for Film, Media, Discourse & Culture, University of Wolverhampton, will run on 17 July 2019. The registration fee will be £30 (£15 for unwaged, free for all postgraduate researchers). A limited budget is available to reimburse childcare costs, upon application, if that will enable attendance: please enquire. The full programme, and booking details, will be published by 24 June 2019.

For updates, fuller details, and booking, please see https://benjaminhalligan.com/divaconference-2/

Deadline for Submissions June 14, 2019
The People of Print: Printers, Stationers, and Booksellers, c. 1500-1830 (6/14/2019; 9/12-14/2019) Sheffield, UK

The editors of a/b: Auto/Biography Studies are delighted to announce that the special issue 34.1, “Trans Narratives,” has now been published digitally with print copies to follow next month. To receive a/b by individual subscription, please email societies@tandf.co.uk. A print and digital subscription, including full access to all archives, is $35USD. Enjoy!

https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/raut20/current?nav=tocList

Deadline for Submissions June 10, 2019

Travel and Literature session: 20th and 21st century travel writing (6/10/2019; 11/14-17) San Diego USA–PAMLA 2019

The travel and literature session welcomes proposals focused on travel, odyssey and mobility through a literary lens, with a special interest in 20th- 21st century travel writing.

We are particularly interested in papers that take into consideration travel writing by authors better known for other forms of writing (novelists, poets, philosophers, essayists) and for whom travel, and travel writing, serve as a means to veer from their habitual modes of writing and allow them to experiment with another form (Baudrillard’s Cool memories, Barthes’ Empire of signs, Leiris’ Phantom Africa are examples of travel narratives of interest).

Topics may include:

  • Theories of travel and travel writing
  • The poetics of travel
  • Travel writing and the self/other
  • Travel writing and ecocriticism
  • Travel journalism, guidebooks and digital media
  • Travel writing and anthropology

Please submit a 300 word abstract and a short bio directly on the PAMLA webiste at https://pamla.ballastacademic.com/home/s/17858/ by June 10th, 2019. You can also contact Cécile Ruel (ruel@cua.edu). Access the conference website at https://pamla.org/2019.

PAMLA’s 117thannual conference will be held in San Diego, CA from Thursday, November 14 until Sunday, November 17, at the Wyndham San Diego Bayside hotel.

Deadline for Submissions June 3, 2019

Memory Lives On: Documenting the HIV/AIDS Epidemic

Memory Lives On: Documenting the HIV/AIDS Epidemic is an interdisciplinary symposium exploring and reflecting on topics related to archives and the practice of documenting the stories of HIV/AIDS.

The task of documenting the history of HIV/AIDS and thinking about the present and future of the epidemic is daunting. The enormity and complexity of the stories and perspectives on the disease, which has affected so many millions of patients and families around the world, present significant challenges that demand continual reexamination. Questions of “what do we collect and from where” and “whose stories do we know best.”  The ways in which we handle documentary evidence and produce knowledge from that evidence has profound effects on a huge range of social, economic and health outcomes. In examining and reflecting on our knowledge of the history of the HIV/AIDS Epidemic and its future, we hope to improve our understanding of the true effects of the disease, and what it can teach us about future epidemics.

The program committee invites  submissions for presentations addressing the HIV/AIDS epidemic from the wide-ranging perspectives of historians, archivists and librarians, artists, journalists, activists and community groups, scientific researchers, health care providers, and people living with HIV. We invite proposals from individuals with diverse experience and expertise on the HIV/AIDS epidemic in scholarship, research and advocacy. Proposals will be considered in a variety of forms including paper presentations, panel discussions and posters.

The Symposium will take place in Byers Auditorium in Genentech Hall at the UCSF Mission Bay Campus in San Francisco, October 4th and 5th 2019.  The program will be an afternoon session and evening reception the first day, followed by a full day of presentations the second.

The Program Committee has identified the following themes to consider when developing your proposal, though we encourage creativity and experimentation in exploring themes, partnerships, and narrative ideas.

  • Documenting the epidemic: Gaps, silences and unheard voices
  • Creating an interdisciplinary narrative of an epidemic
  • Silent no more: Community, caretaker and patient stories
  • The San Francisco Bay Area’s Response to the AIDS Epidemic
  • Biomedical story: From mystery disease to cure
  • From local to global: Learning from AIDS to address future epidemics

The Program Committee welcomes proposals for individual papers, panel discussion and posters. Individual papers with a similar focus will be assembled into a single session by the program committee. Usually 3-4 papers are included in a session.

To allow adequate time for questions and discussion,  panels should be limited to four participants in addition to a chair/facilitator.

Please include the following in your complete proposal

  • Session title if submitting a full panel proposal (of no more than 20 words)
  • Session abstract if submitting a full panel proposal (up to 500 words)
  • Short session abstract for the program if submitting a full panel proposal (up to 50 words)
  • Paper or poster or presentation titles (if any), and names of corresponding presenters
  •  Biographical paragraph for each presenter
  •  E-mail address for each participant
  •  Affiliation, city, state, and country for each participant
  •  Social media handles or web addresses for each participant (optional)
  •  Audiovisual needs
  • Special accommodation needs

The deadline for submissions is June 3. We will notify presenters if their proposal has been accepted by July 22.

Memory Lives On Program Committee

Monica Green, Ph.D.,  Professor of History, Arizona State University

Victoria Harden, Ph.D., Director (retired) of the Office of NIH History

Richard  McKay, DPhil,  Director of Studies for HPS at Magdalene College

Barbara A. Koenig, Professor of Medical Anthropology & Bioethics in the Department of Social & Behavioral Sciences, Institute for Health & Aging and Head of UCSF Bioethics Program

Jay Levy, MD, Professor UCSF School of Medicine

Eric Jost, Digital Marketing Manager, SF AIDS Foundation

Jon Cohen, Staff writer for Science Magazine

Mark Harrington, Executive Director, Treatment Action Group

William Schupbach, Wellcome Library

Jason Baumann, Susan and Douglas Dillon Assistant Director for Collection Development and Coordinator of Humanities and LGBT Collections

Polina Ilieva, Head of Archives & Special Collections, UCSF Library

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Deadline for Abstracts is June 1, 2019

Critical Histories of Aging and Later Life (Radical History Review call for proposals)

Critical Histories of Aging and Later Life

Issue number 139

Abstract Deadline: June 1, 2019

Issue editors: Amanda Ciafone, Devin McGeehan Muchmore, and David Serlin

In 2017, the United Nations estimated that the share of the world’s population over the age of sixty will have doubled between 2000 and 2050. Politicians, corporate executives, and popular commentators warn of a “crisis” produced by population aging, variously invoking concerns about slowed economic development in the global south, strained pensions and welfare systems, a shrinking labor force, and a care deficit.  Concomitantly, academic gerontologists have produced a paradigm of “active” and “successful” aging, conceiving of a physically “healthy,” socially enriched, and economically productive old age that is both a product of, and a solution to, human longevity. These narratives of a “New Old Age” rely upon an overly tidy and teleological account of aging’s history, decrying a simple vision of the bad old days of prejudice and dependency.

The Radical History Review seeks to foster critical perspectives on the histories and politics related to these contemporary understandings of aging and what has been called “later life.” We need radical histories that bring age and aging to the center of analysis and probe the deep past to elucidate antecedents, critiques, and alternative frameworks for making sense of both the “aging crisis” and possibility for thinking about aging and longevity in broader historical perspective. Old age has long bubbled beneath the surface in radical history scholarship: in articulations of kinship and political authority; within transformations of intergenerational relationships wrought by colonialism, industrialization and long histories of migration and settlement; within social welfare and capitalist, socialist, and post/colonial state building; within the ongoing struggles of caring labor and the biopolitical management of life itself; and within the brutal exclusions from old age and infirmity through global systems of inequality and deprivation.

We invite contributions from all time periods and geographies that investigate aging and later life and put them in historical context: as axes for multiscalar and intersectional identities or inequalities, as contested objects of knowledge and governance, as community formations, and sites of cultural and political struggle. We are especially interested in submissions that continue to push the boundaries of aging scholarship beyond Europe, East Asia, and North America, and/or explore histories before the nineteenth century. Such critical approaches would help challenge the narrowly-defined perspectives of the “longevity revolution” among contemporary policy makers and biomedical scientists.

Possible topics include (but are not limited to) histories of:

  • Pre-modern and pre-industrial notions of aging, productivity, community, and selfhood
  • Labor, consumption, and the lifecycle, wealth and poverty, and political economies of aging
  • Aging through the lens of disability history and critical disability studies
  • Biopolitics of populations, state formation, and welfare
  • Ageism as a racial and colonial project, slow death, and necropolitics
  • Death and dying, mourning, and widowhood
  • Aging and heteronormativity, gender hierarchy, and eroticism in later life
  • Elder activism and historical agency
  • Decolonizing aging studies
  • Care, kinship, and intergenerational relations
  • Aging in relation to globalization and migration
  • Archives, oral history, knowledge production, and the age politics of the university

The RHR publishes material in a variety of forms. Potential contributors are encouraged to look at recent issues for examples of both conventional and non-conventional forms of scholarship. We are especially interested in submissions that use images as well as texts and encourage materials with strong visual content. In addition to monographic articles based on archival research, we encourage submissions to our various departments, including:

  • Historians at Work (reflective essays by practitioners in academic and non-academic settings that engage with questions of professional practice)
  • Teaching Radical History (syllabi and commentary on teaching)
  • Public History (essays on historical commemoration and the politics of the past)
  • Interviews (proposals for interviews with scholars, activists, and others)
  • (Re)Views (review essays on history in all media–print, film, and digital)
  • Reflections (Short critical commentaries)
  • Forums (debates)

Procedures for submission of articles:

By June 1, 2019, please submit a 1-2 page abstract summarizing the article you wish as an attachment to contactrhr@gmail.com with “Issue 139 Abstract Submission” in the subject line. Please send any images as low-resolution digital files embedded in a Word document along with the text. If chosen for publication, you will need to send high-resolution image files (jpg or TIFF files at a minimum of 300 dpi) and secure permission to reprint all images.

By July 15, authors will be notified whether they should submit a full version of their article for peer review. The due date for completed articles will be November 1, 2019. Those articles selected for publication after the peer review process will be included in issue 139 of the Radical History Review, scheduled to appear in January 2021.

Contact Info:
Contact Email:

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Deadline for Submissions June 1, 2019

Call for Papers–Assay: A Journal of Nonfiction Studies (6/1/2019)

The purpose of Assay is to publish the best critical scholarship of nonfiction texts, to facilitate all facets of nonfiction conversations in a variety of disciplines, and to be a resource for writers, scholars, readers, and teachers of nonfiction. The deadline for full consideration for our Fall issue is June 1, 2019.

Assay seeks articles and pedagogy essays, as well as shorter discussions of nonfiction craft or individual works for our conversations section. Please find full submission guidelines here.

For the articles section, we are looking for formal academic scholarship on nonfiction texts, techniques, and authors. We welcome all critical lenses, from ecocriticism to postcolonialism and beyond, on texts from traditional to experimental. We seek a wide variety of texts and approaches. Articles should follow MLA style and formatting and be in the 15-25 page range, and must include a Works Cited page.

Our online format makes research materials more accessible to scholars, but it also utilizes the available technology to expand the discussion.  In addition to the written expression of nonfiction criticism, Assay provides the space for both written and video interviews with writers, as well as providing for more informal discussions of reading and teaching in the genre.

We only accept unpublished material; we ask for first serial rights and the publication rights revert to you after publication. We DO NOT accept submissions of creative nonfiction and we DO NOT accept submissions of scholarly articles on fiction or poetry.

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