Author Archives: andy

TRANSOCEANIA 2012

In July, David Hanlon presented at “Transoceania 2012: Currents of Memory, Identity, and Representation Between the Islands of Japan and Oceania,” convened by Greg Dvorak (CPIS MA, 2005) and funded by the Toyota Foundation with support from the Japan Pacific Islands Center and CPIS. Continue reading

Conferences and Meetings

Waves of Change: Climate Change in the Pacific Islands and Implications for Hawai‘i
The Center for Pacific Islands Studies at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa is organizing a two-day conference to explore the environmental, social, cultural, political and economic impacts of climate change in the Pacific Islands, as well as the implications for Hawai‘i and other metropolitan centers. The conference will feature natural scientists, policymakers, academics, university and high school students, teachers and community members. It will include the presentation of papers, panel discussions, and artistic expressions. The conference will be held 4–6 April 2013 at UH Mānoa. Continue reading

Interview With Steven Winduo

Steven Winduo is a Papua New Guinea poet and scholar who teaches at the University of Papua New Guinea. Here he introduces and reads the title poem from his first poetry collection, Lomo’ha I am, in Spirit’s Voice I Call (1991). (5 minutes)
Listen to Noe Tanigawa’s interview with Steven, which was broadcast 11 June 2009, on Hawai`i Public Radio. (3:28)
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Interview With Teweiariki Teaero

Teweiariki Teaero, who was born on Nikunau Island in Kiribati, is an artist, a poet, and a teacher. His distinctive drawings and paintings are inspired by traditional art motifs, ideas, legends, and contemporary issues in the Pacific. He has contributed poetry to numerous literary journals and is the author of two collections—on eitei’s wings and Waa in Storms. Mr Teaero has a Postgraduate Diploma in Education and a Master of Arts in Education from the University of the South Pacific where he is Assistant to the Head of the School of Humanities.
Listen to a interview with Teaero here.
Hawaii Public Radio, April 20th 2006

Q&A WITH TOA FRASER

Playwright, filmmaker, and screenwriter Toa Fraser was CPIS’s Fulbright–Creative New Zealand Pacific Writer-in-Residence for 2009. On 25 September 2009, he showed his awardwinning film Naming No. 2, in which the celebrated American actress Ruby Dee plays an aging Fijian matriarch in New Zealand who orders her fractious extended family to come together to prepare a traditional Fijian feast, at which she will name her successor. Continue reading

A CONVERSATION WITH TEWEIARIKI TEAERO By Katherine Higgins, CPIS MA Student

I-Kiribati poet, artist, and educator Teweiariki Teaero was the Center for Pacific Islands Studies Visiting Artist for 2006 during the latter part of April. While he was at the center, in between trips to Brigham Young University–Hawai‘i Campus and University of Hawai‘i at Hilo and various presentations on campus, he sat down to talk at length about his education, his interests, and his work. The following are some excerpts from that conversation.
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ROSANNA RAYMOND An Interview by Chikako Yamauchi

The center’s Visiting Artist for 2005 was Rosanna Raymond, performance poet, writer, artist, and costume designer.  Raymond explores landscapes of her multiethnic heritage—Samoan father, Pākehā mother, raised in a predominantly Māori community in Aotearoa New Zealand—to create her multimedia art. CPIS MA student Chikako Yamauchi interviewed Raymond about her work and her history with Pacific Sisters, a collective of multimedia artists formed in 1992. The following are excerpts from the interview, along with an image of Raymond’s multilayered art. While she was in Honolulu, Honolulu Advertiser writer Wayne Harada coined the phrase “multitusking maiden,” referring simultaneously to her most memorable performance character, Full-Tusk Maiden, and to her ability to work in several media at one time. In the piece below, Raymond has combined her visual art with her poetry. Continue reading

Available from UH Press

Changing Contexts, Shifting Meanings: Transformations of Cultural Traditions in Oceania, edited by anthropologist Elfriede Hermann, examines cultural traditions as the products of interactions between people and context. 384 pages. ISBN 978-0-8248-3366-4, cloth, US$58.00.
Interpreting Corruption: Culture and Politics in the Pacific Islands, by Peter Larmour, addresses the popular topic of corruption by investigating the causes, meanings, gauges for, and types of corruption in the region. 208 pages. ISBN 978-0-8248-3514-9, cloth, US$49.00.
UH Press books can be ordered through the Orders Department, University of Hawai‘i Press, 2840 Kolowalu Street, Honolulu, HI 96822-1888; the website is http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu

PACIFIC CONNECTIONS SEMINAR SERIES Spring 2012

In February, the Center for Pacific Islands Studies and the East-West Center’s Pacific Islands Development Program (PIDP) launched an interactive seminar series with the University of French Polynesia (UPF) using video-conferencing technology. The Pacific Connections Seminar Series is part of a ten-step plan developed by Terence Wesley-Smith (CPIS) and Jerry Finin (PIDP) when they met with UPF faculty in Tahiti in December 2011. The meetings were initiated to increase faculty and student exchanges between the campuses and to help bridge the Anglophone-Francophone divide in Pacific scholarship.
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SPRING SEMESTER SEMINARS 2012

On 2 March 2012, CPIS MA student Ebil Matsutaro joined Angela “Änghet” Hoppe-Cruz, Darlene Rodrigues, Michael Tun’cap, MA‘O lead intern Shea-Lan Kama, and MA‘O Youth in “Empowering Pacific Youth” a Native Voices Reading and Lecture Series talk-story roundtable. CPIS affiliate faculty members Craig Santos Perez and Brandy Nālani McDougall organized the roundtable discussion to address the challenges that Pacific youth face and opportunities and programs to support them in Hawai‘i and the continental US. CPIS cosponsored the roundtable. Continue reading

CPIS FACULTY PARTICIPATE IN PACIFIC ALTERNATIVES CLOSING CONFERENCE

David Hanlon (History), Geoffrey White (Anthropology), and Terence Wesley-Smith (CPIS) traveled to Norway to participate in “Power in Oceania,” the closing conference of the Pacific Alternatives: Cultural Heritage and Political Innovation in Oceania research project, held 12-15 March at the historic Solstrand Hotel near Bergen. Hosted by project leader Professor Edvard Hviding and other members of the Bergen Pacific Studies Research Group, the conference brought together research scholars from Vanuatu, Solomon Islands, Fiji, Australia, New Zealand, the United States, and Europe who have been involved in the project since its inception in 2008. Continue reading

JAN RENSEL AND ALAN HOWARD AT ASAO 2012

In February, CPIS Editor Jan Rensel and her husband, Emeritus Professor of Anthropology Alan Howard, attended the annual meeting of the Association for Social Anthropology in Oceania (ASAO), held this year in Portland, Oregon, where they presented a paper, “The Valuation of Visual Repatriation: Rotuman Responses,” in a working session on “Photographing Pacific Islanders.” They were also invited presenters at a conference called “Information and Communications Technologies [ICT] and Oceanic Cultures” at the University of the South Pacific’s new Japan-Pacific ICT Centre, where Jan gave a presentation about CPIS publications online and Alan talked about how a website can be of service to an Island community, using the example of the Rotuma Website (www.rotuma.net).

HOKULANI AIKAU’S A CHOSEN PEOPLE, A PROMISED LAND: MORMONISM AND RACE IN HAWAI’I

PIMS board member/CPIS affiliate faculty member Hokulani Aikau (associate professor, UHM Political Science) recently published A Chosen People, a Promised Land: Mormonism and Race in Hawai‘i (University of Minnesota Press 2012). The book explores how Native Hawaiian members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints negotiate their place in this quintessentially American religion. Using the words of Native Hawaiian Latter-Day Saints to illuminate the intersections of race, colonization, and religion, this book examines Polynesian Mormon faith and identity within a larger political context of self-determination.

PACIFIC PLACES CURRICULUM FOR HAWAI‘I 7TH GRADE

On 3 March, CPIS hosted a workshop to review a curriculum unit piloted at 5 middle schools across the state during January and February. The curriculum targets Hawai‘i State Department of Education (DOE) geography benchmarks and was developed by retired DOE resource teacher Donna Mills, DOE staff Pauahi Kazunaga and Big Island teachers Nino Murray and Peter Wagner, with the assistance of Tisha Hickson and Julie Walsh. The group reviewed the aims of the curriculum and the teachers shared their experiences of using the curriculum and suggested activities. The teachers—Nino Murray and Peter Wagner from Hawai‘i, Renee Adams from Maui, and Sean Johnston and Tracy Palmgren from O‘ahu—shared examples of their students’ work from the pilot curriculum and the creative ways they tweaked the lessons to meet the needs and strengths of students.
The teachers’ suggestions are being incorporated into the final curriculum which will be launched via the CPIS website before the start of the 2012–2013 school year. The goal is to provide a Hawai‘i State standards-based resource for Hawai‘i social studies teachers who teach Hawaiian Studies and Pacific Island Studies to 7th grade students.
Curriculum workshop participants.

DR TE RAUKURA O TE RANGIMĀRIE ROA FULBRIGHT SCHOLAR-IN-RESIDENCE WITH MĀORI PROGRAM

The UHM Māori Program will host Dr Te Raukura o Te Rangimārie Roa for the 2012–2013 academic year. Te Raukura o Te Rangimārie affiliates with Waikato, Ngāti Maniapoto, Ngāti Apakura, and Ngāti Korokī-Kahukura. Dr Roa is a fluent speaker of Māori and a member of the first cohort to have benefited from Māori language immersion education. She received a PhD in linguistics and Māori from the University of Waikato, and she is currently the Te Wheke a Toi Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at Waikato, Te Kotahi Research Institute and Te Pua Wānanga. Continue reading

ALUMNI PROFILES: MARGO VITARELLI

From time to time, the newsletter profiles former student to see where their interests in Pacific Islands studies have led them. In September,
the editor talked to artist, curator, and contributing writer to Pacific Magazine Margo Vitarelli (CPIS MA, 1985).
LH: How did you first become interested in enrolling in the Pacific Islands Studies MA program at UH Ma¯noa?
MV: I was living and working in Palau at the Palau Department of Education as a curriculum writer and illustrator in the late 1970s when I first heard of the Center
for Pacific Islands Studies. Continue reading