Harbors in Hawaii

The USS Arizona warship dying in smoke during the attack of Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. This attack by Japan provoked the United States into joining World War II.

USS Arizona warship in smoke during Japan’s attack of Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.

An attack at a local harbor not only put harbors in Hawaii on high alert, but also aggravated the largest war ever seen: World War II. After the Japanese decimated Pearl Harbor without warning on December 7, 1941, the United States declared war, and Hawaii was put under martial law.

As a U.S. naval base, Pearl Harbor was not owned by the Territory of Hawaii, but WWII affected the territory’s harbors nonetheless. The U.S. Navy and Army used the territory’s harbors as military outposts. … Click to read more…

Hawaiian Sugar Manuals

Powered by a nearby waterfall and pumping out smoke through a chimney, a brick sugar mill in Kōloa, Kauai, started to produce sugar in 1835. The Old Sugar Mill of Kōloa would not only operate as Hawaii’s first successful commercial sugar plantation, but also mark the start of Hawaii’s sugar industry.

From 1970, HSPA has documented history, data, and information relating to Hawaii’s sugar industry in its Hawaiian Sugar ManualsClick here for the rest of the article.

 

Opium Habit in the East

Untitled Extract PagesAnd in case you can’t get enough of all things India, eVols is the place to be! Another newly digitized title, The Opium Habit in the East. A study of the evidence given to the Royal Commission on Opium, 1893-4, is now available. This book is a summary of what the Royal Commission on Opium originally presented, and apparently an abbreviated version was much needed: “The Royal Commission on Opium has presented to the public a vast trackless expanse of opinion on the opium question, interspersed with clumps of more or less useful information by way of appendices.” Luckily, Joshua Rowntree breaks it down for us and tells us what we really need to know. https://evols.library.manoa.hawaii.edu/handle/10524/49236.

An Indian Sketch Book

Indian SketchHead on over to eVols to experience a snapshot of life in India in the early 1900s, through English eyes. Leonard Raven-Hill sketched his observations of India in An Indian Sketch Book, Impressions of the East and the Great Durbar. The book includes almost 100 pages of full-page sketches with notes, explaining such things as why sponges weren’t used in the bathrooms (scorpions) and various studies of clothing and fashion choices of people Raven-Hill encountered on his travels in the East. https://evols.library.manoa.hawaii.edu/handle/10524/49224.