International Union for Conservation of Nature conference

Hawaiʻi Community College’s Unukupukupu performs at the International Union for Conservation of Nature World Conservation Congress in Korea.

I am in Jeju, South Korea for the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) World Conservation Congress. I’m here as part of the Hawaiʻi delegation which hopes to bring this huge conference to Hawaiʻi in 2016.

The IUCN addresses 21st century challenges such as biodiversity, climate change, energy and food security, sustainability and public health. Since these issues are also key concerns at the University of Hawaiʻi, we are interested in learning from IUCN and also sharing our own programs.

Bringing the World Conservation Congress to Hawaiʻi in a few years would not only give our tourism industry a big boost, but would offer our faculty and students an invaluable experience and opportunity to contribute to the discussion on a world stage.

<p>At the Hawai'i IUCN booth, from left, Rodrigo Velasquez Gonzales, UH Alumni; M.R.C. Greenwood, University of Hawai'i president; Joshua Atwood, Hawai'i Invasive Species Council coordinator and Leah Laramee, Native Ecosystem Protection and Management section liaison</p>

International Union for Conservation of Nature World Conservation Congress

At the Hawai'i IUCN booth, from left, Rodrigo Velasquez Gonzales, UH Alumni; M.R.C. Greenwood, University of Hawai'i president; Joshua Atwood, Hawai'i Invasive Species Council coordinator and Leah Laramee, Native Ecosystem Protection and Management section liaison

<p>Some of the Hawai'i delegation at IUCN's World Conservation Congress in Jeju, South Korea.</p>

International Union for Conservation of Nature World Conservation Congress

Some of the Hawai'i delegation at IUCN's World Conservation Congress in Jeju, South Korea.

<p>Members of Hawai'i Community College's Unukupukupu take the stage at a reception for IUCN's World Conservation Congress.</p>

International Union for Conservation of Nature World Conservation Congress

Members of Hawai'i Community College's Unukupukupu take the stage at a reception for IUCN's World Conservation Congress.

<p>From left, Mark McGuffie, Enterprise Hawai'i managing director; Ashok Khosla, IUCN president; Brian Schatz, Hawai'i lieutenant governor; M.R.C. Greenwood, University of Hawai'i president; Chipper Wichman, CEO National Tropical Botanical Gardens and Collette Machado, Office of Hawaiian Affairs chair</p>

International Union for Conservation of Nature World Conservation Congress

From left, Mark McGuffie, Enterprise Hawai'i managing director; Ashok Khosla, IUCN president; Brian Schatz, Hawai'i lieutenant governor; M.R.C. Greenwood, University of Hawai'i president; Chipper Wichman, CEO National Tropical Botanical Gardens and Collette Machado, Office of Hawaiian Affairs chair

<p>From left, Christopher Dunn, Lyon Arboretum director, M.R.C. Greenwood, University of Hawai'i president and Suk Chang Lee, Jeju Cultural Heritage Committee president</p>

International Union for Conservation of Nature World Conservation Congress

From left, Christopher Dunn, Lyon Arboretum director, M.R.C. Greenwood, University of Hawai'i president and Suk Chang Lee, Jeju Cultural Heritage Committee president

2 thoughts on “International Union for Conservation of Nature conference

  1. Ryan McCormack

    My sincerest gratitude to you, President Greenwood, for always supporting what we do as Unukupukupu and for navigating the often complex frontier of sustaining indigenous knowledge systems. The opportunity to participate in the World Conservation Congress has further affirmed for me the need for leaders such as yourself in the world today who perceive the impactful role that cultural practices can have in bringing coherence to our global conservation efforts. I am proud to say that I am a member of the University of Hawaiʻi community, as both a learner and an instructor, and will continue to put forth my best effort to uphold the goals you have set as we move forward together in presenting a global model of awakened educational practice.

    Me ke aloha pumehana, with warmest regards,

    Ryan McCormack

  2. Taupouri Tangaro

    Aloha President Greenwood, to present Hula as a Dance of Environmental Kinship at the IUCN was indeed an opportunity to contribute to the conservation of nature on a global level. Not only did this activity align well with UHʻs Imperatives and HawCCʻs Institutional Learning Outcomes, this opportunity was meaningful for our learner group to experience for themselves the power of what it is that Hawaii can share with the world.

    A deep mahalo to you for your continued advocacy for Hawaiʻiʻs contribution to the world.

    Tangarō

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