Author Archives: cernst

Senate honors Lui Hokoana

Three men shaking at podium, two shakinghands

Clayton Hee, Lui Hokoana, Brickwood Galuteria

We were delighted to have two special guests at the most recent meeting of the Board of Regents—Senate Majority Leader and Chair of the Senate Hawaiian Caucus Brickwood Galuteria and Judiciary Chair Senator Clayton Hee. They had heard the terrific news that our own Dr. Lui Hokoana, associate vice president for student affairs, was awarded State of Hawaiʻi Manager of the Year recognition at the recent statewide employees’ Governor’s Awards.

This was such an accomplishment and a validation of the hard work Lui has put in over the years to help all who want it pursue a college degree. The two presented a special Senate Certificate honoring Lui as a native Hawaiian for his accomplishments on behalf of all students. Another well-deserved honor for Dr. Hokoana!

Read more about the award and some of the many comments about Lui.

Legislative tour of cancer center site

Group of people in orange vests and hard hats in front of multi-story building under construction

Lawmakers visiting the UH Cancer Center project with, from left, Regent Dennis Hirota, Mānoa Chancellor Virginia Hinshaw and UH Cancer Center Director Michele Carbone

A number of lawmakers joined us this week for a tour of the University of Hawaiʻi Cancer Center construction project. The new center will help us improve health care for Hawaiʻi cancer patients, advance understanding of cancers that are prevalent in our island population and explore potential new cures found in our unique environment.

View more photos from the tour.

PACOM signing

people at a table in front of APEC 2011 signage

Public and private leader come together to reduce risks associated with natural disasters. Photo by Ric Noyle

The Honolulu Star-Advertiser covered the Veteran’s Day memorandum-of-understanding signing for a public-private partnership to prepare for disasters in the Asia-Pacific region. The University of Hawaiʻi is a major player in the agreement.

More pictures from the signing on the APEC CEO Summit Flickr site.

More on the Thirty Meter Telescope reception

Jim Omura, Virginia Hinshaw, Richard Ha, Mark Yudov standing on lanai

Jim Omura, Virginia Hinshaw, Richard Ha, Mark Yudov at Washington Place

Hamakua Springs President Richard Ha shares pictures and thoughts from the Thirty Meter Telescope reception on his blog. He commends University of California, Santa Barbara, Chancellor Henry Yang for listening to the Big Island community.

That’s Richard, second from right, with Mānoa Chancellor Virginia Hinshaw, Jim Omura of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, left, and University of California President Mark Yudov.

Thirty Meter Telescope reception

<p>University of Hawai‘i President M.R.C. Greenwood, Sen. Daniel Inouye, UH Institute for Astronomy Director Gunther Hasinger and Irene Inouye.</p>

TMT Reception at Washington Place

University of Hawai‘i President M.R.C. Greenwood, Sen. Daniel Inouye, UH Institute for Astronomy Director Gunther Hasinger and Irene Inouye.

<p>From left,UH Manoa Chancellor Virginia Hinshaw, UH Hilo Chancellor Donald Straney, Dilling Yang, University of California System President Mark Yudof, UC Berkeley Professor Steven Beckwith, Senator Daniel and Irene Inouye, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan Director General Shoken Miyama, UH System President M.R.C. Greenwood, UH Institute for Astronomy Director Gunther Hasinger, UC Santa Barbara Chancellor Henry Yang, California Institute of Technology President Jean-Lou Chameau.</p>

TMT Reception at Washington Place

From left,UH Manoa Chancellor Virginia Hinshaw, UH Hilo Chancellor Donald Straney, Dilling Yang, University of California System President Mark Yudof, UC Berkeley Professor Steven Beckwith, Senator Daniel and Irene Inouye, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan Director General Shoken Miyama, UH System President M.R.C. Greenwood, UH Institute for Astronomy Director Gunther Hasinger, UC Santa Barbara Chancellor Henry Yang, California Institute of Technology President Jean-Lou Chameau.

<p>IfA Director Hasinger and President Greenwood welcome Steven Beckwith, University of California, Berkeley vice president of research and graduate studies.</p>

TMT Reception at Washington Place

IfA Director Hasinger and President Greenwood welcome Steven Beckwith, University of California, Berkeley vice president of research and graduate studies.

<p>From right, UH Regent Jan Naoe Sullivan, Governor Abercrombie and UH Vice President Howard Todo welcome from the international TMT consortium.</p>

TMT Reception at Washington Place

From right, UH Regent Jan Naoe Sullivan, Governor Abercrombie and UH Vice President Howard Todo welcome from the international TMT consortium.

<p>Governor Abercrombie talks with UC President Mark Yudof, center, and California Institute of Technology President Jean-Lou Chameau.</p>

TMT Reception at Washington Place

Governor Abercrombie talks with UC President Mark Yudof, center, and California Institute of Technology President Jean-Lou Chameau.

<p>U.S. Senator Daniel Inouye addresses a reception for officials associated with the proposed Thirty Meter Telescope.</p>

TMT Reception at Washington Place

U.S. Senator Daniel Inouye addresses a reception for officials associated with the proposed Thirty Meter Telescope.

<p>Ricard Ellis, CIT; Gary Sanders, TMT; Mike Bolte, UC; Suijian Xue, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Shoken Miyama, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; Hawai&#699;i Governor Neil Abercrombie; Hideki Takami and Masanori Iye, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; Henry Yang, UC Santa Barbara; Ray Carlberg, University of Toronto; A. N. Ramaprakash, University of Pune.</p>

TMT Reception at Washington Place

Ricard Ellis, CIT; Gary Sanders, TMT; Mike Bolte, UC; Suijian Xue, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Shoken Miyama, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; Hawaiʻi Governor Neil Abercrombie; Hideki Takami and Masanori Iye, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; Henry Yang, UC Santa Barbara; Ray Carlberg, University of Toronto; A. N. Ramaprakash, University of Pune.

<p>University of California Observatories Director Michael Bolte, left, and Governor  Abercrombie greet Hawai‘i Congresswoman Mazie Hirono while Masanori Iye, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, waits in front of TMT backdrop.</p>

TMT Reception at Washington Place

University of California Observatories Director Michael Bolte, left, and Governor Abercrombie greet Hawai‘i Congresswoman Mazie Hirono while Masanori Iye, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, waits in front of TMT backdrop.

<p>Hilo businessman Barry Taniguchi and Debbie Goodwin of the Keck Observatories were among the guests, who included representatives from Big Island and astronomy communities; federal, state and university officials;  and benefactors.</p>

TMT Reception at Washington Place

Hilo businessman Barry Taniguchi and Debbie Goodwin of the Keck Observatories were among the guests, who included representatives from Big Island and astronomy communities; federal, state and university officials; and benefactors.

Governor Abercrombie joined me in hosting partners and benefactors for the Thirty Meter Telescope project at Washington Place on Veteran’s Day.

TMT will be the most advanced and powerful optical telescope on Earth when completed in 2018 on Mauna Kea. It will allow astronomers to look back 12 billion years to watch the formation of the first stars and galaxies; probe the turbulent regions around supermassive black holes, including the one at the center of our Milky Way galaxy; and reveal details of planets around nearby stars.

Guests at the reception included officials from TMT partners California Institute of Technology, University of California and the Association of Canadian Universities for Research in Astronomy and participating institutions including the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Department of Science and Technology of India.

We were also delighted to see representatives of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, which is providing significant funding for the project, as well as local, state, national and international leaders.

UH scientists will have guaranteed observing time on the new telescope, and the partnership has pledged $1 million a year to support education on the Big Island.

Clinton APEC event at Mānoa

Daniel Inouye talking to M.R.C. Greenwood

Regent Teena Rasmussen sent this photo of Senator Daniel Inouye and me visiting at a November 10 APEC event, where we were the guests of Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton.

UH Mānoa Ka Leo Associate News Editor Emi Aiko covered Secretary Clinton’s speech at the East-West Center on Thursday, November 10.

Read the full text of Secretary Clinton’s remarks, entitled America’s Pacific Century, on the United States Department of State website.

Business symposium panel on food security

M.R.C. Greenwood at podium with five panelists at table

Congresswoman Colleen Hanabusa and Department of Agriculture Undersecretary Catherine Woteki joined me for a panel I moderated for the Pacific Basin Economic Council Business Symposium on Food Safety and Security during APEC week.

The summit for local and visiting business leaders and government officials addressed a variety of issues facing many economies of the Asia Pacific region. Dr. Woteki, in her keynote address, noted the population of the world could climb to 7 billion by mid-century, and if that trend proves true, the world will need to double its food production to provide nourishment for the planet.

My panel included Dan Picutta of the U.S. State Department, Stan Tseng of Global Tracking Systems and Suzanne Case of the Nature Conservancy. The group addressed issues such as water and other precious resource management, the growth of GMOs, what farms of the future will look like and the pressing need to educate more young people in the agricultural sciences.

Career and Technical Education conference

<p>Leeward Community College hybrid car display<br />
<br />
Assistant professor Rodney Hirokawa, Vice President John Morton, UH President M.R.C. Greenwood, Professor Jacob Darakjian, Professor Eric Pang with</p>

2011 Career and Technical Education Conference

Leeward Community College hybrid car display

Assistant professor Rodney Hirokawa, Vice President John Morton, UH President M.R.C. Greenwood, Professor Jacob Darakjian, Professor Eric Pang with

<p>Honolulu virtual welding display</p>

2011 Career and Technical Education Conference

Honolulu virtual welding display

<p>Leeward television production display</p>

2011 Career and Technical Education Conference

Leeward television production display

<p>Leeward automotive program hybrid car display</p>

2011 Career and Technical Education Conference

Leeward automotive program hybrid car display

<p>Windward veterinary assisting program display</p>

2011 Career and Technical Education Conference

Windward veterinary assisting program display

The UH Community Colleges partnered with the Office of the State Director for Career and Technical Education and the Hawaiʻi State Department of Education to present the 2011 Career and Technical Education conference Where Innovation Begins on Oct. 28 at the Sheraton Waikīkī.

More than 500 people attended from DOE and UH as well as the business community.

I was joined by DOESuperintendent Kathryn Matayoshi to offer opening remarks, but the real highlight was the innovative and interactive exhibits of career and technical education, which included a television production set, virtual welding simulator and carpentry model home project. There were also more than 20 workshops on topics ranging from social media applications to cyberbullying and hands-on technology stations with personal guidance.

More from the Ryukyus

<p>Hawai‘i Governor Neil Abercrombie, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology President Jonathan Dorfan and University of Hawai‘i President M.R.C. Greenwood in Okinawa. Greenwood later toured the campus in northern Okinawa and discussed opportunities for collaboration with the 10-year-old institution.</p>

Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology

Hawai‘i Governor Neil Abercrombie, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology President Jonathan Dorfan and University of Hawai‘i President M.R.C. Greenwood in Okinawa. Greenwood later toured the campus in northern Okinawa and discussed opportunities for collaboration with the 10-year-old institution.

<p>The University of Hawai‘i delegation toured Shuri Castle, the reconstructed residence and administrative headquarters of Ryukyus kings, in Naha, Okinawa.</p>

Greenwood in Okinawa 2011

The University of Hawai‘i delegation toured Shuri Castle, the reconstructed residence and administrative headquarters of Ryukyus kings, in Naha, Okinawa.

<p>University of Hawai‘i President M.R.C. Greenwood and Hawai‘i Gov. Neil Abercrombie pose playfully with a pair of shisa, Ryukyuan guardian lion/dogs from Okinawa mythology traditionally flanking gates to Okinawan homes to keep good spirits in and frighten evil spirits away.</p>

Greenwood in Okinawa 2011

University of Hawai‘i President M.R.C. Greenwood and Hawai‘i Gov. Neil Abercrombie pose playfully with a pair of shisa, Ryukyuan guardian lion/dogs from Okinawa mythology traditionally flanking gates to Okinawan homes to keep good spirits in and frighten evil spirits away.

<p>University of the Ryukyus President Teruo Iwamasa and  University of Hawai‘i President M.R.C. Greenwood exchanged gifts during a recent visit by a Hawai‘i delegation to the sister univeristy in Okinawa. President Greenwood presented President Iwamasa with a small replica of the Hawaiian Voyaging Canoe Hokule'a as a symbol of the shared ocean between Japan and Hawaii and the rich wayfinding heritage of Polynesia.</p>

Greenwood in Okinawa 2011

University of the Ryukyus President Teruo Iwamasa and University of Hawai‘i President M.R.C. Greenwood exchanged gifts during a recent visit by a Hawai‘i delegation to the sister univeristy in Okinawa. President Greenwood presented President Iwamasa with a small replica of the Hawaiian Voyaging Canoe Hokule'a as a symbol of the shared ocean between Japan and Hawaii and the rich wayfinding heritage of Polynesia.

<p>University of the Ryukyus President Teruo Iwamasa with Hawai‘i Gov. Neil Abercrombie and University of Hawai‘i President M.R.C. Greenwood after the honorary degree presentation in Okinawa.</p>

Greenwood in Okinawa 2011

University of the Ryukyus President Teruo Iwamasa with Hawai‘i Gov. Neil Abercrombie and University of Hawai‘i President M.R.C. Greenwood after the honorary degree presentation in Okinawa.

<p>University of Hawai‘i President M.R.C. Greenwood plants an Okinawan cherry tree with University of the Ryukyus President Teruo Iwamasa near the Administration Building on the Okinawa campus. Originally established on the site of Shuri Castle, which was destroyed in the Battle of Okinawa, in 1950, this national university, like the University of Hawai‘i, builds on the unique natural, cultural and historical characteristics of an archipelago and takes its values from its community's history—nuchi du takara (life is indeed a treasure)—with a commitment to freedom and equality, tolerance and peace.</p>

Okinawa tree planting

University of Hawai‘i President M.R.C. Greenwood plants an Okinawan cherry tree with University of the Ryukyus President Teruo Iwamasa near the Administration Building on the Okinawa campus. Originally established on the site of Shuri Castle, which was destroyed in the Battle of Okinawa, in 1950, this national university, like the University of Hawai‘i, builds on the unique natural, cultural and historical characteristics of an archipelago and takes its values from its community's history—nuchi du takara (life is indeed a treasure)—with a commitment to freedom and equality, tolerance and peace.

Is was my high honor to accept an honorary degree from our sister university, the University of the Ryukyus, in Okinawa. It was bestowed by President Teruo Iwamasa, witnessed by and celebrated with Governor Neil Abercrombie!

Our paths intersected in Okinawa for both the Festival parade and the degree award. Okinawan goodwill ambassadors Bob Nakasone and Ed Kuba (a former UH regent) accompanied us on this visit and were invaluable sources of knowledge and information.

We also visited the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, where I met with officials to discuss potential collaborations.

Governor Abercrombie then traveled on to China to promote Hawaiʻi economic opportunities and tourism, but it was great to have him with us in Okinawa for a few days. Check out our playful posing with the two large shisa statues. President Iwamasa presented both of us with smaller versions of shisa as mementos of our visit.

Okinawa, here we come!

University of Hawaii officials at Cornerstone of Peace Monument museum in Okinawa

We had a lovely welcome from our Okinawa colleagues, some great food and music upon our arrival in Okinawa. Joining me for this leg of this Asia trip is, from left, Ken Kaneshiro, director of the Center for Conservation Research and Training and Hawaiʻi Evolutionary Biology Program; UH Foundation President Donna Vuchinich; Ed Kuba, a former regent and goodwill ambassador to Okinawa; and Bob Luey, director or the UH Mānoa Center for Japanese Studies, which recently launched the Center for Okinawan Studies.

Our first order of business was a visit to the Cornerstone Peace Monument (museum in the background above) where I placed flowers at the entrance and viewed the many, many marble slabs bearing the names of those who perished in the Battle of Okinawa during World War II. The names include the Okinawa residents, the mainland Japanese soldiers and the US soldiers who died. We also visited the touching Himeyuri monument dedicated to more than 200 Okinawan high school girls who lost their lives in the last days of the battle while serving as nursing assistants. It was a very sad story and a well done memorial.

We also spent time visiting Chuba Hospital, where UH has a long relationship and helped to build the very successful postgraduate education program modeled on the American system of training. We met with Chuba Hospital Director Ashimine, below, and members of his staff. More than 900 students have completed this program, now operated by the John A, Burns School of Medicine. Watch the coming issue of Mālamalama for an article on the program.

View additional photos.

UH representatives at Chuba Hospital