Kepakemapa 12: “No ka Dute Maluna o ke Dala Maoli a me ke Gula ke Laweia aku mai Keia Aina aku”

September 12, 1842: Export Duty on Silver and Gold

The law passed below on September 12, 1842 abolished the duty placed on silver and gold exported from the country. The duty was abolished because of the harmful impact on commerce. The law below also relates to the proper payment of witnesses appearing in jury trials.

Available in Statutes – Rules and Regulations of the King and Council 1843.

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Kepakemapa 11: Richardson kūʻē iā Kekeanui

September 11, 1852: Richardson v. Kekeanui

In this civil matter, Richardson brought suit against Kekeanui for the debt of $2.50 owed for a pair of shoes meant for Kekeanui’s wife. In the introductory paragraph provided below, Circuit Court Judge John Richardson first provides the procedural history of the case. Specifically, that the case was originally heard by District Judge Harbottle (for the district of Kipahulu and Kaupo) who ruled in favor of the plaintiff. The case was brought before Judge Richardson in his chambers. The case provides interesting insight into the value and exchange rate for commodities and services–for example, the value of olonā, paʻakai, and hauling baggage in exchange for a pair of women’s shoes.

An excerpt of this case is provided below.

Available in Judiciary Branch Records, 242-2 Civil and Criminal Minute Books of 2d CC, Judge John Richardson, July 1852-December 1853.

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Kepakemapa 10: No ke Kumukānāwai o ka Hui Kūʻai ʻĀina o Wainiha

September 10, 1877: Regarding the Constitution of the Land Acquisition Association of Wainiha

As explained by Adam Roversi in his article entitled, The Hawaiian Land Hui Movement: A Post-māhele Counter-Revolution in Land Tenure and Community Resource Management, “[i]n 1869, seventy-one Hawaiians joined together to purchase virtually the entire 15,000-acre ahupuaʻa of Wainiha on the Island of Kauaʻi. Although they held title to the land as private property, they did so communally, sharing the use and management of the unoccupied and uncultivated portions of the ahupuaʻa including the near shore fishery.” This group was known as Hui Kuai Aina o Wainiha. Nearly 80 years later in 1947, this Hui was forcibly broken apart in partition proceedings initiated by McBryde Sugar Company.

Below are short excerpts of the original organizing document entitled, “Kumukanawai o ka Hui Kuai Aina o Wainiha.” A transcription follows.

Available in Wainiha, Hui Kuai Aina o Wainiha Records, 1877 – 1900.

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Kepakemapa 8: Ke Aliʻi kūʻē iā Maohe a me Manele

September 8, 1852: King v. Maohe and Manele

While adultery cases were quite common in the Kingdom era, less common were cases involving a “ménage à trois.” In this Second Circuit Court Minute Book entry, Judge Richardson heard a criminal case of adultery brought against Manele (the wife), and Maohe (an unmarried male). Puhi, the legal husband, was listed as an accessory (kōkua hewa). Witnesses testified that they saw them sleeping together at Puhi’s house, with the husband on one side, Manele in between, and Maohe on the other side. It was repeatedly stated that the husband did not give up his wife for purposes of prostitution. The case was tried in Mokulau in Kaupo. An excerpt from this case, followed by a short transcription, are provided below.

Available in Judiciary Branch Records, 242-2 Civil and Criminal Minute Books of 2d CC, Judge John Richardson, July 1852-December 1853.

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Kepakemapa n.d.: Nalowale ke Kala

September 1887 (n.d.): Missing Money

The following excerpt was “filed” at the front of the folder containing Attorney General records from September 1887. The letter intimates that certain fraudulent activities were occurring at the police station house in Honolulu. Specifically, that there were shortages in the accounts at the station house. The letter explains that this has become a regular occurrence since the “unceremonious dismissal of  “the old faithful servant McKeage [McKeague].” Officer Sam McKeague was the station house keeper for Honolulu, prior to the events referenced in this letter. See Richard A. Greer, “Sweet and Clean”: The Chinatown Fire of 1886,” 10 Haw. J. Hist. 33 (1976) (available here).  The author of this letter is unknown (it contains no signature or address). The attorney general at this time was Clarence Ashford, who replaced Antone Rosa just a few months prior.

A brief transcription is provided below for this short excerpt.

Available in Attorney General Records 1887, September.

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Kapakemapa 2: “Liliuonamoku”

September 2, 1838: “Liliuonamoku”

Queen Liliʻuokalani, the Hawaiian Kingdom’s last reigning monarch, was born on September 2, 1838. To celebrate her 180th birthday, Punawaiola presents a mele found in the Foreign Office and Executive Numbered collection entitled “Liliuonamoku” (affectionately, Liliʻu of the Islands). Transcriptions are provided below.

Available in Foreign Office and Executive Numbered Documents 200-208.

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