Previous Brown Bag Series

SLS THURSDAY LECTURE SERIES
(THE BROWN BAG)
 
October 26, 2017 Two Talks
12:00 – 1:15 p.m.
St. John 11
 
 
Visiting College Research Presentation, Two Talks
 
 
Motivational Model of English Learning Among Elementary School Students in Japan
 
Presenter: Junko Matsuzaki Carreira, Professor, Tokyo Keizai University
 
EFL Students’ Use of their First Language (L1) in Performing Formative Assessment Activities
 
Presenter: Nattharmma Thong-Iam, Chulalongkorn University
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SLS THURSDAY LECTURE SERIES
(THE BROWN BAG)

August 31, 2017 Two Talks
12:00 – 1:15 p.m.
St. John 11

Faculty Showcase Talks:
Learn What Your Professors and Colleagues Are Doing
(Fall 2017 Part I)

Please join us as we continue our new series of ‘Faculty Showcase Talks’ with presentations by 

Richard Day (Professor, SLS) and JD Brown (Professor, SLS).

 
SLS THURSDAY LECTURE SERIES
(THE BROWN BAG)
April 13, 2017 Two Talks
12:00 – 1:15 p.m.
St. John 11

Dynamic development of lexical sophistication through a series of academic tasks: A semester-long study [Practice Talk]

Presenter:
Masaki Eguchi, Waseda University & UH-Mānoa Department of Second Language Studies
English Medium Instruction (EMI) , where a non-language subject is taught in English (Hellekjær, 2010), has been gaining popularity among higher educational institutions in EFL settings (Doiz, Lasagabaster, & Sierra, 2013; Taguchi, 2014). The pedagogical activities in EMI have various features in common with TBLT. It comprises various unfocused, real-world academic tasks (e.g., readings, presentations) with primary attention to meaning (Ellis, 2003 Ortega, 2015). It also reflects learners’ needs to prepare for future academic, professional goals in a meaningful context. In such classes, however, tracking the longitudinal development of linguistic performance has been an important agenda (Doiz et al., 2013; Ortega & Iberri-shea, 2005). In particular, lexical sophistication, defined as both quantity and quality of lexical resources a learner employs (Kyle & Crossley, 2015), is one of the topics that needs further investigation (Skehan, 2009).
The current study therefore investigated semester-long development of lexical sophistication in small group discussions in an EMI course. Three intermediate-level undergraduate Japanese learners of English in the target EMI (MTOEFL ITP = 543.3), who had previously taken at least one EMI course, agreed to participate in this study. The weekly EMI sessions comprised reading assignments, written open-ended quizzes, two student presentations, and group and classroom discussions. The small groups, the focus of the study, consists of four to five students in each of four groups. Every discussion task was recorded during the semester and transcribed (13 sessions). Indices of lexical sophistication were computed with TAALES (Kyle & Crossley, 2015), and were plotted to look for patterns of development for each index using Dynamic System Theory (DST) framework (Verspoor, De Bot, & Lowie, 2011).
The result confirms a view that development of lexical sophistication is multifaceted and incremental in nature (Schmitt, 2010). Whereas one of the participants increased the quantity of frequently used multiword chunks (i.e., Ngrams), another developed his quality of those chunks at the expense of the quantity (see also Bestgen & Granger, 2014). The results are discussed in terms of complexity theory, drawing on their experiences in EMI. The discussion further presents possible directions for further research in EMI classrooms in EFL settings.

The effect of strategic planning of oral CAF:
A synthesis [Practice Talk]

Presenters:
Mitsuko Suzuki, UH-Mānoa Department of Second Language Studies

The purpose of this paper is to synthesizes the findings of primary research studies that investigated strategic planning effect on oral complexity, accuracy, and fluency (CAF). Over 180 studies were initially collected, and reviewed for inclusion and exclusion to minimize the bias. In order to investigate the overall role of strategic planning in oral tasks, a special focus was put on the CAF measures and the operationalization of pre-task and main task, including (a) the instruction given prior to the planning, (b) type of pre-task planning activity, (c) length of planning time, and (d) type of main task. Following a brief review of past pre-task planning studies, this presentation will explore to what extent these variables may influence language learners’ oral task performance.

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SLS THURSDAY LECTURE SERIES
(THE BROWN BAG)
February 2, 2017
12:00 – 1:15 p.m.
St. John 11
A Corpus-Based Study of Critical Discourse Analysis of News Reports on Climate Change in China
Presenter:
Tingting Sun, SLS Visiting Colleague from
China University of Geosciences
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SLS THURSDAY LECTURE SERIES
(THE BROWN BAG)
 
January 26, 2017
12:00 – 1:15 p.m.
St. John 11
 
Effect of Tracking Authentic Video Clips on the Enhancing of Comprehensibility and Intelligibility of L2 Speech:
A Mixed-Methods Approach
 
Presenter:
Dianning Qu, SLS Visiting Colleague from Central South University, China
 
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SLS LECTURE SERIES
(THE BROWN BAG)
 
TUESDAY, January 17, 2017
12:00 – 1:15 p.m.
Note Location: Biomedical Sciences, T-208
 
Validity evidence of interactional competence in role-play speaking assessment
 
Presenter:
Soo Jung Youn, PhD
 
 
This large-scale study examines the relationship between detailed interactional features of 102 test-takers’ performances on five role-play tasks and test scores awarded by raters to the performances. 102 test-takers’ performances were transcribed and coded for interactional features and sequential organizations that are grounded in Conversation Analysis. The quantitative power of the coded interactional features in distinguishing among varying levels of performance was further examined. I argue that recurrent interactional features found across test-takers’ levels serve as critical validity evidence of interactional competence. I discuss the implications of analyzing language test data as an empirical basis of measuring L2 spoken proficiency.

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Thursday, January 12, 12 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. 

Center for Korean Studies Auditorium

Inference and generalizability: Investigations of large- and small-scale assessments and small-sample research

Presenter: Dr. Geoff LaFlair

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Place-based Language Learning Using Mobile Technology: An Analysis of an Original MALL Game and Its Redesign for a HELP Course

December 1, 2016

Presenters:

Dan Holden & Yang Liu
SLS Graduate Students, UH-Mānoa

In the field of Second Language Studies (SLS), there has been a growing interest in research in the areas of Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) and Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL) since the early 2000s. In addition to these researcher interests, the idea of using video games as language learning tools, particularly in online contexts, has been gaining popularity as well. In Holden & Sykes (2011), the researchers describe their unique work in a high school Spanish classroom which used an augmented reality MALL game that combined elements of mobile technology and video game design to create a new experience for the second language users. By utilizing a combination of theories of place-based learning and MALL, the research team at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa was able to design their own augmented reality game to be implemented in the Hawai’i English Language Program (HELP).

After analyzing both in-game data and conducting a series of post-game interview data with both students and administrators, the game, Guardians of the Mo’o (Mo’o 1.0), was deemed to be successful in achieving its initial design goals and was given support to possibly become part of the regular HELP curriculum, pending modifications. This paper outlines the theoretical background for creating such a game, as well as provides a detailed analysis of how Mo’o 1.0 was created and ultimately played by the target group of language learners. Then, the focus will be shifted to explain how the second version of the game (Mo’o 1S) was redesigned and modified to fit into a new experimental course in the HELP summer curriculum.

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GSO Presentation

10/10/2013

Here is a PDF format of presentation, which was delivered by

Jaun Manuel Escalona-Torres and Mónica Vidal on 10/10/2013

Click the hyperlink to download GSO Brown Bag 10 10 2013