WEATHER WATCH: Ana Updates Will Appear Here Regularly Until Storm Passes

The John A. Burns School of Medicine Emergency Response Group is monitoring Tropical Storm Ana as it approaches Hawai`i. We will be giving you the latest information here on the web; and if necessary, through more direct means including email. For now, we’re mostly watching and waiting, and will advise you of any key decisions affecting the medical school campus.

Here’s the 3 pm update from the National Weather Service:
At 300 pm Sunday HST, 0100 UTC, the center of tropical storm Ana was located near latitude 20.7 north, longitude 160.9 west. Ana is moving toward the west near 8 mph, 13 km/h, and this motion is expected to continue through Monday, followed by a gradual turn toward the northwest Tuesday.

Maximum sustained winds are near 70 mph, 110 km/h, with higher gusts. Ana is expected to remain just below hurricane strength through Tuesday, but is expected to remain a strong tropical storm.

Tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 105 miles, 165 km.

The estimated minimum central pressure is 994 mb, 29.35 inches.

HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND
WIND
Tropical storm conditions are expected over Kauai county today, and over Nihoa tonight. Tropical storm conditions are expected over necker island, French Frigate Shoals, and tern island Monday night. Hurricane conditions are possible over French Frigate Shoals and tern island Monday night.

SURF
Large swells produced by Ana will continue to impact most of the main Hawaiian islands today, and will reach the northwest Hawaiian islands later today and tonight. Surf produced by these swells could potentially be damaging along exposed southern and southeastern shorelines.

RAINFALL
Ana is expected to bring total rainfall amounts of 3 to 6 inches, with local amounts up to 8 inches, over Kauai and Niihau. Rainfall associated with Ana will move over the smaller islands from Niihau to Maui today. Rainfall will gradually diminish later in the day over Oahu and Maui. Rainfall amounts of 4 to 8 inches, with local amounts of 12 inches, are possible over the northwest Hawaiian islands along and near the track of the center of Ana.