AVAILABLE NOW: BIOGRAPHY 45.1

We are pleased to announce the publication of Biography 45.1, which includes open-forum articles and reviews. Find it on Project Muse: https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/49084

Biography 45.1, Table of Contents

Editor’s Note

Open-Forum Articles

Screening Clara Schumann: Biomythography, Gender, and the Relational Biopic

Julia Novak

This article examines four biopics about nineteenth-century musicians Clara Schumann and Robert Schumann as gendered manifestations of the “Schumann biomyth.” It traces the development of the figure of Clara in relation to the films’ historical and political contexts, changing genre conventions, and the demands of (inter)national film industries.

Textile Auto/biography: Protest, Testimony, and Solidarity in the Chilean Arpillerista Movement

Lisa Ortiz-Vilarelle

Beginning in 1975, arpillera workshops allowed women to work collectively to document the acts of violence committed against their loved ones under Augusto Pinochet’s regime in Chile. Arpilleras, burlap embroidered with patchwork depictions of people and landscapes, are made from garments of the dead and disappeared. This essay focuses on the clandestine nature of this artwork and features images of arpilleras from one of the largest known collections.

Identity Work, Sexuality, and the Reception of Testimony:
On Identification with Anne Frank

Hannah Jakobsen

In a group of online personal essays, readers of Anne Frank’s Diary narrativize their identification with Frank as the turning point in a coming-out story. Pointing to one Diary passage in particular, these reader-essayists describe relating to a sexuality that they perceive in Frank. I first ask how identification functions in life writing, examining its role in the negotiation and articulation of sexual identity in these cases. I then ask how and why—particularly given their focus on sexuality—these reader-essayists identify with the author of a canonical testimony to atrocity.

Autobiographical Convergences: A Cultural Analysis of Books by Swedish Digital Media Influencers

Gabriella Nilsson

Through a close reading of autobiographical books written by Swedish digital media influencers, individuals who live and make a living from their daily online life narratives, this article analyzes how the life narratives are plotted and framed to fit the auto­biographical format. Two interwoven but contradictory narrative themes are found. One is the depiction of digital media as a positively charged, colorful sanctuary, a cyborg world appearing to the authors in a time of need. The other theme is the individual life histories of the authors, who strive to create chronologies and seek causal explanations for the various events and experiences of their lives. While the depiction of digital media appears to be a way to justify their current lifestyle, the life history stands out as a way to counter the fragmentation of digital media.

Reviews

Research Methodologies for Auto/biography Studies, edited by Kate Douglas and Ashley Barnwell

Reviewed by Desirée Henderson

The Oxford History of Life-Writing: Volume 1, The Middle Ages, by Karen A. Winstead

Reviewed by Derrick Higginbotham

Romanticism and the Letter, edited by Madeleine Callaghan and Anthony Howe

Reviewed by Mary A. Waters

Prison Life Writing: Conversion and the Literary Roots of the U.S. Prison System, by Simon Rolston

Reviewed by D. Quentin Miller

The Territorialities of U.S. Imperialism(s): Conflicting Discourses of Sovereignty, Jurisdiction and Territory in Nineteenth-Century U.S. Legal Texts and Indigenous Life Writing, by Jens Temmen

Reviewed by Katrina Phillips

Americánas, Autocracy, and Autobiographical Innovation: Overwriting the Dictator, by Lisa Ortiz-Vilarelle

Reviewed by Renata Lucena Dalmaso

Indian Travel Writing in the Age of Empire, 1830–1940,
by Pramod K. Nayar

Reviewed by Shaswat Panda

Sports Journalism and Women Athletes: Coverage of Coming Out Stories, by William P. Cassidy

Reviewed by Michael Tsai

Templates for Authorship: American Women’s Literary Autobiography of the 1930s, by Windy Counsell Petrie

Reviewed by Pamela L. Caughie

Contemporary Feminist Life-Writing: The New Audacity,
by Jennifer Cooke

Reviewed by Kate Drabinski

Charlotte Salomon and the Theatre of Memory, by Griselda Pollock

Reviewed by Julia Watson

BROWN BAG BIOGRAPHY: FALL 2022

We’re thrilled to announce the schedule for Brown Bag Biography, Fall 2022. As with the last few semesters, all of our talks will be presented online via Zoom, meaning that anyone, anywhere, can join!

This semester, however, some of our talks will be in hybrid format, with the option to attend the presentations in person in Biomed B-104 (UH Mānoa). We look forward to seeing some of you at the Center again!

We will also record and post some of the talks. You can find some past presentations on our YouTube channel here.

THE CENTER FOR BIOGRAPHICAL RESEARCH, UNIVERSITY OF HAWAIʻI AT MĀNOA

PRESENTS

BROWN BAG BIOGRAPHY

DISCUSSIONS OF LIFE WRITING BY & FOR TOWN & GOWN
THURSDAYS, 12:00 NOON–1:15 PM HST
ALL SESSIONS ON ZOOM; SOME ALSO IN PERSON IN BIOMED B-104 (UH MĀNOA)

Fall 2022 SCHEDULE

September 21: “History in Crisis, History in Focus—What History does Hawaiʻi need, and Why does it Matter?”
Shannon Cristobal, Director of Hawaiʻi History Day and K-12 Humanities Programs, Hawaiʻi Council for the Humanities
Noelani Goodyear-Kaʻōpua, Professor of Political Science, Indigenous Politics Program
Amy Perruso, Hawaiʻi State House Representative, District 46, DOE Social Studies and Civics Teacher, former secretary-treasurer, HSTA
Moderated by Davianna Pōmaikaʻi McGregor, Professor of Ethnic Studies and Director, Center for Oral History, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Sponsored by Hawaiʻi Ponoʻī Coalition 
NB: Time: 6:00–7:30 pm HST
Website: http://hawaiianhistorymonth.org 
Zoom registration link: https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_3IhskxUTTIa1EhxL4kl_Vg

September 23: “Hawaiian History and Culture K-12 and Beyond—Across the Curriculum, Across the Pae ʻĀina”
Whitney Aragaki, Science Teacher, Waiakea High School, State Teacher of the Year 2022
Patricia Espiritu Halagao, Professor and Chair, Curriculum Studies, College of Education, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Cheryl Kaʻuhane Lupenui, President and CEO, Kohala Center, and Founder, The Leader Project
Christopher Pike, Fifth Grade Teacher, Chiefess Kapiʻolani Elementary School
Lyz Soto, Communications Officer, Hawaiʻi Council for the Humanities
Moderated by Jonathan Kay Kamakawiwoʻole Osorio, Dean, Hawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Sponsored by Hawaiʻi Ponoʻī Coalition 
NB: Time: 6:00–7:30 pm HST
Website: http://hawaiianhistorymonth.org 
Zoom registration link: https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_hMROuc-QSyKf8ebqQSmVlw

September 29: “Peeking Behind the Curtains at Catherine the Great: Celebrity in the Eighteenth Century” 
Ruth Dawson, Prof. Emerita, Dept. of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, UH Mānoa; Honorary Fellow, Institute of Modern Languages Research, University of London
Presentation Format: Hybrid (Biomed B-104 and Zoom)
Time: 12:00–1:15 pm HST
Zoom link:  https://hawaii.zoom.us/j/98160195964
Zoom Meeting ID: 981 6019 5964, Password: 651017

October 6: “The Unimagined Journey: Nova Scotia to Hawai‘i”
Dr. Clem Guthro, University Librarian UH Manoa and Interim Director and Publisher, University of Hawai‘i Press
Presentation Format: Hybrid (Biomed B-104 and Zoom)
Time: 12:00–1:15 pm HST
Zoom link:  https://hawaii.zoom.us/j/94535100181
Zoom Meeting ID: 945 3510 0181, Password: 779100

October 13: “The Representation of Space in Edward Said’s Out of Place
Lili Chen, PhD Student in Institute of World Literature, Peking University, specializing in American Immigrant Autobiography
Presentation Format: Hybrid (Biomed B-104 and Zoom)
Time: 12:00–1:15 pm HST
Zoom link:  https://hawaii.zoom.us/j/94072405841
Zoom Meeting ID: 940 7240 5841, Password: 438940

October 20: “Crafting a Life: Writing the Biography of a 20th-Century Woman Artist Born and Raised in Hawai‘i”
Dr. Sharon Weiner, Department of English, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Presentation Format: Hybrid (Biomed B-104 and Zoom)
Time: 12:00–1:15 pm HST
Zoom link:  https://hawaii.zoom.us/j/98547221272
Zoom Meeting ID: 985 4722 1272, Password: 591805

October 27: “From Masking to Masquerade: Autofictional Forms and Effects in Diachronic Perspective”
Dr. Alexandra Effe, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of Oslo.
Presentation Format: Hybrid (Biomed B-104 and Zoom) 
Time: 12:00–1:15 pm HST
Zoom link:  https://hawaii.zoom.us/j/96172869118
Zoom Meeting ID: 961 7286 9118, Password: 336906

November 3: Graphic Medicine: Stories Drawn from Illness, Health, and Caregiving”
Suzy Becker, Author/Illustrator and New Yorker Cartoonist
Jared Gardner, Professor of English and Director of Popular Culture Studies, The Ohio State University
Crystal Yin Lie, Assistant Professor of Comparative World Literature, Cal State University, Long Beach
JoAnn Purcell, Faculty and Program Coordinator, Illustration, Seneca College
Susan Squier, Brill Professor Emeritus of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and English, Penn State University and Board Member Graphic Medicine Collective  
Julia Watson, Professor Emerita of Comparative Studies, The Ohio State University
Presentation Format: Zoom
Time: 12:00–1:15 pm HST
Zoom link: https://hawaii.zoom.us/j/97632020673
Zoom Meeting ID: 976 3202 0673, Password: 813967

November 10: “Atoll Depth: The Case of the Funafuti Expedition, 1896–98”
Dr. Carla Manfredi, Assistant Professor, Department of English, The University of Winnipeg 
Presentation Format: Hybrid (Biomed B-104 and Zoom) 
Time: 12:00–1:15 pm HST
Zoom link: https://hawaii.zoom.us/j/97793395796
Zoom Meeting ID: 977 9339 5796, Password: 921205

November 17: “In Community with Our Shared Place: A Teacher’s Journey”
Whitney Aragaki (she/they), 2022 Hawaiʻi State Teacher of the Year, 2022 National Teacher of the Year Finalist
Presentation Format: Zoom
Time: 12:00–1:15 pm HST
Zoom link:  https://hawaii.zoom.us/j/98769665844
Zoom Meeting ID: 987 6966 5844, Password: 774603

November 24: Thanksgiving

December 1: “He Aloha No Kaualilinoe: The Nūpepa Writings of a Kanaka from Mānoa”
J. Hauʻoli Lorenzo-Elarco, Instructor of Hawaiian Language, Honolulu Community College; PhD Student, Ka Haka ʻUla o Keʻelikōlani, University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo
Presentation Format: Zoom 
Time: 12:00–1:15 pm HST
Zoom link: https://hawaii.zoom.us/j/97463593162
Zoom Meeting ID: 974 6359 3162, Password: 606520

Available Now: Graphic Medicine

We are pleased to announce the release of Graphic Medicine as both a special issue of Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly on Project Muse and as a book available through the University of Hawai‘i Press

Edited by Erin La Cour and Anna Poletti, Graphic Medicine brings together scholars and comics artists to consider how life narratives in the medium of comics open up new channels of communication between medical staff, patients, their loved ones, and the community. These include creating alternative sites for community building among patients and their loved ones with regard to specific conditions and their related treatments, and educating medical practitioners about patient experiences within healthcare systems. By treating illness and disability as experiences of fundamentally changed living, rather than as separate narrative episodes organized by treatment, recovery, and a return to “normal life,” Graphic Medicine asks what it means to give and receive care.

Through autobiographical comics and illustrated essays, Safdar Ahmed, John Miers, Suzy Becker, Nancy K. Miller, and Jared Gardner offer alternative modes of understanding illness and disability, caring relationships, and temporality. Crystal Yin Lie and Julia Watson demonstrate how use of the page through panels, collages, and borderless images can draw the reader, as a “mute witness,” into contact with the body as a site where intergenerational trauma is registered and expressed. Kiene Brillenburg Wurth examines how microscripts productively extend graphic medicine beyond comics to “outsider art.” JoAnn Purcell and Susan M. Squier display how comics artists respond to and reflect upon their caring relationships with those diagnosed with an intellectual disability. And Erin La Cour interrogates especially difficult representations of relationality and care. 

During the past decade, graphic medicine comics have proliferated—an outpouring accelerated recently by the greatest health crisis in a century. Graphic Medicine helps us recognize that however unpleasant or complicated it may be, interacting with such stories offers fresh insights, suggests new forms of acceptance, and enhances our abilities to speak to others about the experience of illness and disability.

Table of Contents

Erin La Cour and Anna Poletti, “Graphic Medicine’s Possible Futures: Reconsidering Poetics and Reading”

John Miers, “Conflict or Compromise?: An Imagined Conversation with John Hicklenton and Lindsay Cooper about Living with Multiple Sclerosis” 

Jared Gardner, “Out of Sync: Chronic Illness, Time, and Comics Memoir”

Nancy K. Miller, “‘Is this recovery?’: Chronicity and Closure in Graphic Illness Memoir” 

Erin La Cour, “Face as Landscape: Refiguring Illness, Disability, and Disorders in David B.’s Epileptic” 

JoAnn Purcell, with Simone Purcell Randmaa. “Disability Daily Drawn: A Comics Collaboration” 

Susan M. Squier, “Reframing ‘Nothing About Us Without Us’: Comics and Intellectual Disability” 

Safdar Ahmed, “Graphic Confessions and the Vulnerability Hangover from Hell”

Julia Watson, “Drawing Is the Best Medicine: Somatic Dis-ease and Graphic Revenge in Miriam Katin’s Letting It Go” 

Suzy Becker, “If That’s What You Want to Call It: An Illustrated Rx-Ray for Graphic Medicine”

Crystal Yin Lie, “Drawn to History: Healing, Dementia, and the Armenian Genocide in the Intertextual Collage of Aliceheimer’s” 

Kiene Brillenburg Wurth, “Outsider Writing: The Healing Art of Robert Walser”

Congratulations Biography Prize Co-Winners 2022!

The Center for Biographical Research is pleased to announce the winners of this year’s Biography Prize for outstanding creative, critical, or theoretical work in the field of life writing by University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa graduate students. 

This year’s awardees produced outstanding research on Hawaiʻi subjects. The doctoral award goes to a full biography of a 20th century Hawaiʻi artist. The masters award this year is especially notable, as it honors the first prize-winning submission composed entirely in ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi. More detailed descriptions of the projects, and the judges’ comments appear below. 

“Juliette May Fraser: A Kamaʻāina Life in Art” by Sharon Weiner

The judges appreciated how detailed, well researched, and clearly written your chapter was. We found the details about camouflage work particularly interesting. We also admired how you put the chapter’s details, many of them seemingly mundane, together in a compelling way to tell a rich narrative about Fraser and her expanding circle of influence. As well, we appreciated the diversity of your sources, and your skill in providing contexts for those featured in the chapter.

“Heleleʻi Ka Ua Lilinoe, Ola Ka Honua” by Jacob Hauʻoli Lorenzo-Elarco

The evaluator described how you used an arresting framework to address how we come up with pen names; your extensive research in the Hawaiian-language newspapers along with pertinent secondary/English-language sources; and your success in combining intellectual biography and using clues in that work to write a speculative biography on limited information. He also appreciated your discussion of kapu, and your writing style, which he found reminiscent of the nineteenth century author you are writing about. He praised your use of sustained metaphors of mist, rain and water that he noted would be particularly valued by those who read traditional moʻolelo. Our committee reached clear consensus based on these strengths that your thesis is deserving of the prize.

2022 Biography Prize Nominations Now Open

Criteria for Nomination:

  • The candidate should be a PhD or MA student in any graduate department of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (or have graduated with an MA or PhD in December 2021).
  • The submission can be work written for a class, a section of a thesis or dissertation, or a completed thesis or dissertation. If written for a class, it should be work completed between May 2021 and April 2022 (and not previously submitted for a Biography Prize).

The project should be 3,000 to 10,000 words in length. Longer projects can be submitted in their entirety, with a particular chapter or section highlighted for consideration. The work should demonstrate knowledge or awareness of central debates and theorizing in the field and study of life writing.

Please send nominations (graduate student’s name and subject or title of project) and contact information to Paige Rasmussen (biograph@hawaii.edu) by Thursday, April 14.

Once you send your nomination, the Center for Biographical Research will notify the student to arrange for submission of the project. Candidates may also nominate their own work for the award. The deadline for submissions is Monday, April 25.

The winner of the Biography Prize receives a monetary award and is invited to give a presentation in the Brown Bag Biography lecture series.

Brown Bag Biography, Spring 2022

We are delighted to announce the schedule for Brown Bag Biography, Spring 2022. This semester, as with the last few semesters, all of our talks will be presented online via Zoom, meaning that anyone, anywhere, can join in! We will also record and post some of the talks. You can find some from Fall 2020, Spring 2021, and Fall 2021 on our YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWW2zPhLyvpDGVpFPUmHHLw.

THE CENTER FOR BIOGRAPHICAL RESEARCH, UNIVERSITY OF HAWAIʻI AT MĀNOA

PRESENTS

BROWN BAG BIOGRAPHY

DISCUSSIONS OF LIFE WRITING BY & FOR TOWN & GOWN
THURSDAYS, 12:00 NOON–1:15 PM HST • ONLINE VIA ZOOM


SPRING 2022 SCHEDULE

February 3: “The Making of Reel Wahine of Hawai‘i
Vera Zambonelli and Shirley Thompson, series co-producers and directors
Meleanna Meyer, visual artist and filmmaker, season III cast member
Joy Chong-Stannard, live television and documentary director, season III cast member
Cosponsored by Hamilton Library, the Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution, the Academy for Creative Media, Hui ʻĀina Pilipili: Native Hawaiian Initiative, the Hawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge, the School of Communications, the Center for Oral History, the Departments of Ethnic Studies, Political Science, and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, and the University of Hawai‘i West Oʻahu Academy for Creative Media
Zoom Meeting ID: 936 7791 2215
Password: 184444

February 10: “Constructing the Ghoul Boys: Queerying Ethics and Identity in Buzzfeed Unsolved and Its Real-Person Fiction (RPF)”
Zoë E. Sprott, MA Candidate, English; Reviews Editor and Editorial Assistant at the Center for Biographical Research, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Cosponsored by Hamilton Library, the Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution, the Academy for Creative Media, the School of Communications, and the Departments of Political Science and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Zoom Meeting ID: 920 0132 6880
Password: 589979

February 17: “Hawaiʻiloa and the End of the Kanaka Diaspora”
Michael David Kaulana Ing, Associate Professor, Department of Religious Studies, Indiana University
Cosponsored by Hamilton Library, the Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution, Hui ʻĀina Pilipili: Native Hawaiian Initiative, the Hawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge, and the Departments of Religion, Ethnic Studies, and Political Science
Zoom Meeting ID: 967 2316 5685
Password: 493614

February 24: “Memorializing Dr. Haunani-Kay Trask”
M. Healani Sonoda-Pale, Kanaka Maoli and Citizen of Ka Lāhui Hawaiʻi
Cosponsored by Hamilton Library, the Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution, Hui ʻĀina Pilipili: Native Hawaiian Initiative, the Hawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge, and the Departments of Ethnic Studies, Political Science, History, and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Zoom Meeting ID: 953 4618 1006
Password: 421123

March 3: “Inclusion: How Hawaii Protected Japanese Americans from Mass Internment, Transformed Itself, and Changed America”
Tom Coffman, Political Journalist, Author, Filmmaker
Cosponsored by Hamilton Library, the Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution, Hui ʻĀina Pilipili: Native Hawaiian Initiative, the Hawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge, and the Departments of History, Ethnic Studies, and Political Science
Zoom Meeting ID: 969 7952 5765
Password: 697708

March 10: “Sharing Stories of Pain on Social Media”
L. Ayu Saraswati, Associate Professor, Department of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Cosponsored by Hamilton Library, the Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution, the Academy for Creative Media, and the School of Communications, and the Departments of Political Science and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Zoom Meeting ID: 942 1123 1535
Password: 700655

March 24: “Indigenizing the Writing Center”
Georganne Nordstrom, Associate Professor, Department of English, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa; Vice President, International Writing Center Association 
Kalilinoe Detwiler, MA Candidate, English; Center Coordinator, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Writing Center 
Kayla Watabu, MA Candidate, English; Research/Workshop Coordinator, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Writing Center
Cosponsored by Hamilton Library, the Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution, Hui ʻĀina Pilipili: Native Hawaiian Initiative, the Hawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge, the School of Communications, and the Departments of Ethnic Studies, Political Science, and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Zoom Meeting ID: 954 9657 0215
Password: 975259

March 31:Sweat and Salt Water: Generating a Testament to the Legacy of Teresia Kieuea Teaiwa”
Dr. April K. Henderson, Director of Va’aomanū Pasifika—Programmes in Pacific Studies and Samoan Studies, Te Herenga Waka/Victoria University of Wellington
Terence Wesley-Smith, Professor (retired), Center for Pacific Islands Studies, UHM
Katerina Teaiwa, Professor of Pacific Studies and Deputy Director – Higher Degree Research Training in the School of Culture, History and Language, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, Australian National University
Cosponsored by Hamilton Library, the Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution, Hui ʻĀina Pilipili: Native Hawaiian Initiative, the Hawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge, and the Departments of Ethnic Studies, Political Science, and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Zoom Meeting ID: 964 6893 6495
Password: 765773

April 7: “‘Trouble Enough’: Enslaved Women’s Testimony as an Ethics of Care”
Elizabeth Colwill, Associate Professor, Department of American Studies, and Affiliate Faculty for the Department of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Cosponsored by Hamilton Library, the Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution, and the Departments of History, Ethnic Studies, Political Science, and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Zoom Meeting ID: 919 2757 7192
Password: 208236

April 14: “From Research to Curriculum: Grassroots Strategies for Getting Your Life Stories into Classrooms”
Ron Williams Jr., PhD, Archivist at the Hawaiʻi State Archives, and Owner of Ka ʻElele Research and Writing and For Goodness Sake, a community education non-profit
Cosponsored by Hamilton Library, the Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution, Hui ʻĀina Pilipili: Native Hawaiian Initiative, the Hawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge, and the Departments of Ethnic Studies and Political Science
Zoom Meeting ID: 991 1226 0590
Password: 345501

April 21: “Talking Story: A Panel on the Bamboo Ridge Oral History Project”
Eric Chock and Darrell Lum, founding editors
Juliet Kono, current editor-in-chief
Jean Toyama, past guest editor, lead on the Bamboo Ridge preservation project
Moderated by Donald Carriera Ching and Ken Tokuno
Cosponsored by Hamilton Library, the Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution, Hui ʻĀina Pilipili: Native Hawaiian Initiative, the Hawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge, the School of Communications, the Center for Oral History, and the Department of Ethnic Studies
Zoom Meeting ID: 981 9620 8507
Password: 980287

BIOGRAPHY 44.1: INTERNATIONAL YEAR IN REVIEW & ANNUAL BIBLIOGRAPHY

The latest issue of Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly, vol. 44, no. 1, 2021, can be accessed on Project Muse here: https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/46786

Remembering Lauren Berlant

More Flailing in Public

Anna Poletti

National Fantasies about the Self

Rebecca Wanzo

An excerpt from Riva Lehrer’s Golem Girl: A Memoir

International Year in Review

From Individual to Collective Memories: The Year in Aruba

Rose Mary Allen and Jeroen Heuvel

Burning Shame, Decolonizing (His)tory, and Writing Illness
and Disability: The Year in Australia

Kylie Cardell

Viennese Modernism and No End: The Year in Austria

Wilhelm Hemecker and David Österle

COVID-19 Emergency Diaries: The Year in Brazil

Sergio da Silva Barcellos

Lives Interrupted: The Year in Canada

Alana Bell

“Diaries in the Lockdown City”: The Year in China

Chen Shen

To Belong—or Not to Belong: The Year in Denmark

Marianne Høyen

“Is the World Still There?”: Estonian Lockdown Diaries:
The Year in Estonia

Leena Kurvet-Käosaar and Maarja Hollo

Stories of Secrets, Wounds, and Healing: The Year in Finland

Kirsi Tuohela

“Ways of Worldmaking”: The Year in France

Joanny Moulin

Complicit Filmmakers, Self-Made Women, and the Weltgeist
on Horseback: The Year in Germany

Tobias Heinrich

Parallel Pathways: The Year in Hungary

Ágnes Major and Zoltán Z. Varga

Eyes Wide Open with Paper in Hand: The Year in Italy

Ilaria Serra

Prison Narratives: The Year in South Korea

Heui-Yung Park

Illness Writing and Revolution, Converging Narratives:
The Year in Lebanon

Sleiman El Hajj

“A Place on the Banknote”: The Year in Malawi

Nick Mdika Tembo

Periodismo, crimen, misoginia: El año en México

Gerardo Necoechea Gracia

A Profusion of Perspectives: The Year in Netherlands

Hans Renders and David Veltman

Pandemic Diaries: The Year in Poland

Paweł Rodak

Fighting Against Traditions of Silence: The Year in Portugal

Cláudia Maria Ferreira Faria

Documenting Lives: The Year in Romania

Ioana Luca

Narratives of a Pandemic: The Year in Spain

Ana Belén Martínez García

Imagining Gender+ Justice amid the Pandemic:
The Year in Turkey

Hülya Adak

Necrography: The Year in the United Kingdom

Tom Overton

Pandemic Reading: The Year in the United States

Leigh Gilmore

Annual Bibliography of Works about Life Writing, 2020

Compiled by Zoë E. Sprott

Books

Edited Collections and Special Issues

Articles and Essays

Dissertations

Brown Bag Biography, Fall 2021

Another season of Brown Bags begins today! As the series continues over Zoom, all are welcome to attend.

The series is entering its thiry-fourth year—well over 750 sessions have been held so far.

THE CENTER FOR BIOGRAPHICAL RESEARCH, UNIVERSITY OF HAWAIʻI AT MĀNOA

PRESENTS

BROWN BAG BIOGRAPHY

DISCUSSIONS OF LIFE WRITING BY & FOR TOWN & GOWN
THURSDAYS, 12:00 NOON–1:15 PM HST • ONLINE VIA ZOOM


FALL 2021 SCHEDULE

September 16: “Footstepping, Perhapsing, and Bio-bits”
Li Shan Chan, PhD student in English at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and 2021 Biography Prize winner
Cosponsored by Hamilton Library, the International Cultural Studies Program, and the Departments of Ethnic Studies and Asian Studies
Zoom Meeting ID: 959 4518 4532
Password: 330127

September 23: “Spirit Beyond the Law: Radical Abolition from Olaudah Equiano to Colin Kaepernick”
Hannah Manshel, Assistant Professor of English at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Cosponsored by Hamilton Library, the International Cultural Studies Program, and the Departments of Ethnic Studies, History, and Political Science
Zoom Meeting ID: 986 0181 8734
Password: 380847

September 30: “Oral History of Okinawan Kibei/Nisei/Issei Women”
Karen C. Oshiro, MEd, Assistive Technology Practitioner, Certified Aging in Place Specialist
Cosponsored by Hamilton Library, the Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution, the School of Communications, the Center for Okinawan Studies, the Center for Oral History, and the Departments of Ethnic Studies, History, Political Science, Anthropology, and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Zoom Meeting ID: 959 4604 6252
Password: 212581

October 7: “Remembering Our Intimacies: Moʻolelo, Aloha ʻĀina, and Ea”
Dr. Jamaica Heolimeleikalani Osorio, Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Cosponsored by Hamilton Library, the Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution, the Hui ʻĀina Pilipili: Native Hawaiian Initiative, the School of Communications, the Center for Oral History, and the Departments of Ethnic Studies, History, Political Science, and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Zoom Meeting ID: 996 1558 1124
Password: 996097

October 14: “A Hybrid Memoir: A Reading and Discussion”
Dr. Rajiv Mohabir, Assistant Professor of Writing, Literature, and Publishing at Emerson College
Cosponsored by Hamilton Library, the Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution, the Hindi-Urdu Language Program, the International Cultural Studies Program, the Center for South Asian Studies, and the Departments of Ethnic Studies, Political Science, and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Zoom Meeting ID: 971 5659 7266
Password: 385232

October 21: “In Time, A Writer”
Stephanie Sang, PhD student in English and 2021 Biography Prize winner
Cosponsored by Hamilton Library, the Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution, and the Departments of Ethnic Studies, Political Science, and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Zoom Meeting ID: 915 3862 5616
Password: 052859

October 28: “An Ethics of Settler Decolonization in Hawaiʻi”
Logan Narikawa, PhD candidate American Studies, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Cosponsored by Hamilton Library, the Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution, the School of Communications, the Center for Oral History, and the Departments of Ethnic Studies, History, Anthropology, and Political Science
Zoom Meeting ID: 940 1700 6818
Password: 687351

November 4: “Learning What Makes My Heart Smile!”
Dr. Virginia S. Hinshaw, Chancellor Emeritus of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Cosponsored by Hamilton Library, the Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution, the School of Communications, and the Department of Political Science
Zoom Meeting ID: 940 4661 6602
Password: 815666

November 18: “Becoming Foreign: Love and Writing Across the Cultural Divide”
Heather Diamond, PhD in American Studies from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Cosponsored by Hamilton Library, the Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution, and the Department of Asian Studies
Zoom Meeting ID: 984 1734 7287
Password: 769161

“We Are Maunakea: Aloha ʻĀina Narratives of Protest, Protection, and Place”: a special issue of biography

“We Are Maunakea: Aloha ʻĀina Narratives of Protest, Protection, and Place”

A special issue of Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly, now available online at https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/44621.

PC: Antonio Agosto, Visionize Media

HONOLULU, HI, June 10, 2021 – Aloha pumehana. Guest editors Bryan Kamaoli Kuwada and Noʻu Revilla and the editorial team of Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly are proud to present a special issue on the lifewriting strategies of the kiaʻi (protectors) who gathered at Puʻuhonua o Puʻuhuluhulu in the summer of 2019 to defend Maunakea against desecration by the construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). 

This special issue features first-hand accounts, academic reflections, creative works, photography, and interviews with kiaʻi from the 2019 front lines and members of the media team.

“We Are Maunakea: Aloha ʻĀina Narratives of Protest, Protection, and Place” is now available on Project Muse. The entire issue can be accessed at this link:

https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/44621.

Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly explores the theoretical, generic, historical, cultural, and practical dimensions of life writing. For further information, consult the website of the Center for Biographical Research at blog.hawaii.edu/cbrhawaii.

The Value of Hawaiʻi 3: Hulihia, the Turning published online

The Value of Hawaiʻi 3: Hulihia, the Turning, the latest volume in the Biography Monograph series from CBR and the University of Hawaiʻi Press, is now available free online! On ScholarSpace here: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/70171 & https://scholarspace.manoa.hawaii.edu/handle/10125/70178. The print version will be published in February 2021. More information here: https://uhpress.hawaii.edu/title/the-value-of-hawai%ca%bbi-3-hulihia-the-turning/.

“Hulihia” refers to massive upheavals that change the landscape, overturn the normal, reverse the flow, and sweep away the prevailing or assumed. We live in such days. Pandemics. Threats to ʻāina. Political dysfunction, cultural appropriation, and disrespect. But also powerful surges toward sustainability, autonomy, and sovereignty.

The first two volumes of The Value of Hawaiʻi (Knowing the Past, Facing the Future and Ancestral Roots, Oceanic Visions) ignited public conversations, testimony, advocacy, and art for political and social change. These books argued for the value of connecting across our different expertise and experiences, to talk about who we are and where we are going.

In a world in crisis, what does Hawaiʻi’s experience tell us about how to build a society that sees opportunities in the turning and changing times? As islanders, we continue to grapple with experiences of racism, colonialism, environmental damage, and the costs of modernization, and bring to this our own striking creativity and histories for how to live peacefully and productively together. Steered by the four scholars who edited the previous volumes, The Value of Hawaiʻi 3: Hulihia, the Turning offers multigenerational visions of a Hawaiʻi not defined by the United States. Community leaders, cultural practitioners, artists, educators, and activists share exciting paths forward for the future of Hawaiʻi, on topics such as education, tourism and other economies, elder care, agriculture and food, energy and urban development, the environment, sports, arts and culture, technology, and community life.

These visions ask us to recognize what we truly value about our home, and offer a wealth of starting points for critical and productive conversations together in this time of profound and permanent change.